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WorldBeat

Summer Music Festival Adds Flavor to Diverse Soundscape of Quebec; Ekova Gets Inspiration From All Corners of World

Aired July 23, 2000 - 0:00 a.m. ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

BROOKE ALEXANDER, HOST: Hi, I'm Brooke Alexander and this is WORLD BEAT. We are in the beautiful city of Quebec, Canada for the Summer Music Festival, or, as they say en France, Festival de ate du Quebec (ph).

Coming up, musical flavors from around the world fill the rustic streets of the city's old quarter; from the traditional to the hip, sounds of Quebec's own musical scene; and the crossover inspirations of Ekova.

From Cameroon to Cuba, Quebec City's annual summer music festival attracts musicians from every corner of the globe. The venues are spread across the old city from outdoor amphitheaters to quaint little cafes. For two weeks, Quebec becomes a musical tour de force and, as you will see, there's more than just one musical flavor du jour.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

P-18, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CHRISTOPHER HINES, "THE FLIP SIDE" (voice-over): Fusing different musical styles is a key element of the festival and it is no better represented than by the 10 member ensemble P-18. Hailing from France, Cuba, Spain and Ireland, the high energy group runs Caribbean, African, Celtic and electronica for a new world alternative sound.

TOM DARNAL, P-18: You can open the door for a new sound for the what we are still calling the world music. And the world music should escape from the small place where they put it in the record store, you know?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

P-18, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Trilok Gurtu, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HINES: Trilok Gurtu of India has already blended the traditional sounds of his homeland with jazz and rock. He's now set his musical sights on Africa, with an album mixing rhythms from the two continents.

TRILOK GURTU: Without Africa we wouldn't have blues, we wouldn't have salsa, we wouldn't have sambas and without Indian music you wouldn't have had Indian, the improvisations, you know?

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Sally Nyolo, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HINES: Sally Nyolo is a rising star on the world music stage, inspired by the complex and fast-paced rhythms of her native Cameroon. And something more.

SALLY NYOLO: My musical influences are bekoots (ph), the rhythm of the forest, my native rhythm because I was born in the deep forest of Cameroon south of Camerouni (ph) and I believe that the first music I heard, it was the music of the birds and the music of the wind in the leaves. It was a bekoots.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Sally Nyolo, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Amadou and Mariam, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HINES: The husband and wife duet of Amadou and Mariam are inspired as much by the rich musical heritage of their homeland Mali as they are by their love for one another. Although they are both blind, they have shed light on an innovative blend of musical styles.

AMADOU: We started playing with a simple guitar and we sang. We then started bringing in other instruments like the electric guitar, bass and keyboards. We started to universalize our music so it would be accessible to everyone.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Amadou and Mariam, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

MARIAM: The message we are sending is one of love, peace, equality and tolerance.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

The California Guitar Trio, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HINES: The California Guitar Trio draws its members from Europe, Japan and the United States, offering an international crossover of plucking styles.

PAUL RICHARDS: We each bring a bit of our own background. Burt has more of a classical background and brings along with it a whole classic repertoire. My background is more in blues and jazz and rock music. Idiol (ph) has transcribed some traditional Japanese coloe (ph) music and is also an avid surf guitar fan.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

The California Guitar Trio, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Les Nubians, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HINES: These two sisters from France are causing a stir on both sides of the Atlantic with their melange of soulful African and European music, or as some call it, Afropean.

CEUA FAUSSART, LES NUBIANS: We are French and Cameroonian and so we are taking, we are very inspired from the culture we have and we live in France so we have this European culture. But also we are inspired by American music and we can say worldwide music, music from Africa, from the Caribbean islands.

HELENE FAUSSART, LES NUBIANS: Black music.

CEUA FAUSSART: Black music.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Los Amigos Especiales, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

DEBASHISH BHATTACHARJEE: This festival has brought many different cultures together and as you know, that music comes from different provinces and different cultures. If some has very good thing and some doesn't know any other thing about the other world.

BOB BROZMAN: In every language of the world we say play music, we don't say work music, and this is a chance for us to get together and play just like kids play. And the musicians that we've all got to meet have become quite a family that can travel in small groups or large groups around the world and it's a beautiful thing to discover the things that are in common between musicians, the things that are different. Every musician has different capabilities and limitations and it's a fascinating challenge to find music that we can all play together.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

ALEXANDER: And now for a look at some of the world's other musical offerings here is Luke Crampton and the "Fresh Cuts."

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Janet, Original Soundtrack, "Nutty Professor 2: The Klumps"

(END VIDEO CLIP)

LUKE CRAMPTON, "FRESH CUTS" (voice-over): A stellar cast of R&B and hip hop acts provide the soundtrack to the new Eddie Murphy starring Nutty Professor sequel. A diverse mix of hard rap tracks by the likes of Method Man and bad boy du jour Eminem are offset by more soulful offerings from Case, Brian McKnight and Janet Jackson, who offers the pleasing single, "Doesn't Really Matter."

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Amanda Ghost, "Filthy Mind"

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CRAMPTON: In spite of her Spanish and Indian roots and her English upbringing, female newcomer Amanda Ghost serves up a solid mainstream rock/pop effort on her maiden set, "Filthy Mind." In addition to the bold dance groove energy of the title cut, the rewarding second single "Idle (ph)" should make significant inroads for this promising artiste.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Everclear, "Songs from An American Movie Vol. 1 -- Learning How To Smile"

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CRAMPTON: American punk pop trio Everclear has mercifully smoothed out its sound with the release of its fourth album. "Songs from An American Movie" is an almost graceful outing with a '70s retro feel and boasts the outstanding future smash "A.M. Radio" and the superb first single, "Wonderful."

I'm Luke Crampton. Those are the "Fresh Cuts."

(END VIDEOTAPE) ALEXANDER: Just ahead, WORLD BEAT'S exclusive global top 10 chart plus the new sounds of Quebec.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

Top Ten:

10. RICHARD ASHCROFT, "Alone With Everybody" 9. IRON MAIDEN, "Brave New World" 8. RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS, "Californication" 7. MOBY, "Play" 6. WHITNEY HOUSTON, "The Greatest Hits" 5. B.B. KING & ERIC CLAPTON, "Riding With the King" 4. SANTANA, "Supernatural" 3. EMINEM, "The Marshall Mathers LP 2. BON JOVI, "Crush" 1. BRITNEY SPEARS, "Oops!...I Did It Again"

(END VIDEOTAPE)

ALEXANDER: Canada's Quebec Province strives to stand out from the rest of the country not only in language, but in culture and tradition. From rock and rave to country, Quebec's musical offerings are just as unique.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Celine Dion, "I Want You To Need Me"

(END VIDEO CLIP)

NEIL CURRY, "THE BEAT" (voice-over): Celine Dion is by far Quebec's biggest musical export, mastering the ability to produce worldwide pop hits. But other leading artists in Quebec are keeping their music and lyrics closer to home.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Eric Lapointe, "Tendre Fesse"

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CURRY: Eric Lapointe is one of Quebec's biggest selling musicians, doling out his own unabashed style of rock and roll.

ERIC LAPOINTE: The music is manner of expression but also to reaffirm that we are Francophile. We buy more French-language music here per person than they do in France.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Eric Lapointe, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP) Kevin Parent, "Tu Pourras Dire"

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CURRY: Kevin Parent currently tops the sales charts in Quebec with his folksy rock style.

KEVIN PARENT: If you have a few good melodies and you sing in French in Quebecois, that's pretty much the core materials you're going to need to work in Quebec.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Kevin Parent, "Seigneur"

(END VIDEO CLIP)

PARENT: Their language, it's basically a thing of pride, I think. They were just born and raised like that and they feel sometimes pushed, pushed into a little corner.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

D.J. Ram and Ramasutra, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CURRY: D.J. Ram, his mother is Danish and father Indian, is introducing new elements into the Quebec music scene.

D.J. RAM: Well, I think Montreal is a really multicultural city. There's so many little areas if you just take, you know, one bus you can pass from Chinatown to the Portuguese part of town to the Greek part of town and, you know, there's so many people around that you always hear all kinds of different music coming from like everyone's homes and I think that influences the way I do my music.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

La Bottine Souriente, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CURRY: La Bottine Souriente is a standard bearer of traditional Quebec music that has scored success in Europe, as well.

REGENT ARCHAMBAULT, LA BOTTINE SOURIENTE: Thirteen years ago we started to do kind of fusion with traditional music in Quebec and in 1990 we added the brass sections in the band and it gave something, something very special that, that's the time when we got more popular around the folk festivals and around the world.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Luck Merveil, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CURRY: Luck Merveil scored a hit in Paris and London in a Quebec-produced musical but admits his experience is an exception.

LUCK MERVEIL: We're so different that even in France, it's not that easy to export. Quebec is kind of unique in the world. You have this place, this province with six million people speaking French and all around it 300 million people speaking English. And these people are French but not yet, yet not the same French that are from France.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Luck Merveil, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(END VIDEOTAPE)

ALEXANDER: We now cross to the Belgian capital of Brussels to catch up with the best selling artists in Europe as "The Beat" rounds up this week's music news.

TRACY LITTLE, "THE BEAT": Thanks, Brooke, and welcome to "The Beat." I'm Tracy Little coming to you from Brussels.

Now, the WORLD BEAT team has come here to the Belgian capital in order to bring you the platinum European music awards. Artists from across the E.U. and beyond are being recognized for selling at least one million copies of their album. Now, that's certainly nothing new for the hugely successful Corrs, who have also come here to celebrate taking on a new role in the European music industry.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JIM CORR, THE CORRS: It's a daunting task but we're really, really happy to be representing artists and musicians worldwide and we hope that we can make a change and bring in the necessary proper legislation into Europe.

LITTLE (voice-over): The Corrs will soon be very experienced in the politics of music. They're taking over for French superstar Jean- Michele Jarre as the official voice for the European music industry. It's a role that has recently been dominated by the fight for musicians to decide if the cyber world should have free access to their work.

JEAN-MICHELE JARRE: We must take care of our heritage as Europeans, as European artists.

LITTLE: This musical march on Brussels wasn't just about doing battle with Internet pirates. Later on it was business aside and time to roll out the red carpet for artists who have gone platinum in Europe. Phil Collins hosted the event and told us afterwards how it felt to be introduced as one of the greatest recording artists of all time. PHIL COLLINS: It's a bit embarrassing because, you know, obviously these things are said. I put them into perspective. Don't worry, no one need worry that I think I'm one of the greatest recording artists of all time. I know I'm just Phil.

LITTLE: Melce (ph) proves she's more than just a Spice Girl. She's now the first member of the band to sell a million albums as a solo artist. This was not a first for Danish pop stars Aqua.

LENE NYSTROM, AQUA: And after "Barbie Girl" we had lots of number ones from the album, from the first album as well and proving that we can do it on the second album, as well.

LITTLE: Rock star Luciano Ligabue brought a taste of Italy to the awards.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Ligabue, "Quella Che Mon Se!"

(END VIDEO CLIP)

LITTLE: And Alejandro Sanz, who has sold the most albums in Spanish history, expressed what most of these artists have probably thought at one time or another.

ALEJANDRO SANZ: My mother is proud of me, you know?

(END VIDEOTAPE)

LITTLE: Well, that's "The Beat." For more music news, you can check out our Web site at cnn.com/worldbeat. For now, I'm Tracy Little in Brussels. Let's go back to Brooke in Quebec.

ALEXANDER: When we return, we'll have an encounter with a French-based trio called Ekova, which has invented a unique musical language.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

ALEXANDER: Welcome back to the Festival de Ataie (ph) in Canada's historic Quebec City.

Now, one of the bands which has been impressing the crowds here is Ekova. It's a Paris-based trio whose members have roots in France, Britain, Iran and Algeria. Their music melds Celtic with Middle Eastern influences and much, much more. But their lyrics are in the language that they have made all their own. Ekova, this week's "Inside Track."

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Ekova, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

DEIRDRE DUBOIS, EKOVA: Ekova is a music that mixes acoustic kind of traditional or ancient sounds with, I don't know, futuristic or abstract or, you know, modern sounds as well. And, but at the same time it's very, it's meeting on this imaginary bridge.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Ekova, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

DUBOIS: Since we're using a lot of tonal sounds, which is like you hear in Indian or African or a lot of different traditional musics, we're not doing chord changes like you hear in rock and pop and even jazz.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Ekova, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

DUBOIS: When I first met Arash (ph), who was born in Teheran and more and more he started getting interested in his own musical culture and background. He has been able to mix the classical Iranian style, which is using all of his 10 fingers on the drum, and he's mixed that with African percussion, with Indian rhythms and, which gives it a whole flavor, I mean, of his own.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Ekova, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

DUBOIS: And Mehdi (ph) was born in Algeria. His mother is French and his father is Algerian. So he's got already this mix of cultures. He started playing around the time he was 11 but he was not playing ooud (ph). He was playing electric guitar and was listening to Jimi Hendrix and kind of transposed what he could from the guitar to the ooud. All three of us were really listening to a lot of like psychedelic, new wave rock, hard rock, and stuff, even punk when we were young. And so that has, you know, that's really part of who we are.

All of a sudden we all started looking somewhere else and wanted to play and play with acoustic instruments and getting, you know, something totally different than what was happening in the music scene and just, you know, going in a whole another direction, which was acoustic. Little by little, we started to fade the electronic and the psychedelic part back in.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Ekova, Unidentified Song (END VIDEO CLIP)

DUBOIS: When I'm singing in that way, I'm not controlling it totally. But I'm feeling free to ornament, much more freely than if I were trying to get the words and the syllables to fit in the melodies and I'm also feeling freer to improvise and to go off the set melody.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Ekova, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

DUBOIS: For me as a musician, I felt it weighed me down to be telling stories about my life or about my problems or -- and, you know, and being able to just make the music and let the music be itself and express itself, for me is the adventure that I'm on.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

Ekova, Unidentified Song

(END VIDEO CLIP)

(END VIDEOTAPE)

ALEXANDER: Well, that is all for this edition of WORLD BEAT. We will leave you with more from the Summer Music Festival in Quebec City. We'll see you soon, or, as they say en France, aviento (ph). From me, Brooke Alexander, and the entire WORLD BEAT team, thank you for joining us.

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