Skip to main content
CNN.com /transcript


CNN TV
EDITIONS

CNN NEWSROOM

NEWSROOM for August 7, 2001

Aired August 7, 2001 - 04:30   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
ANNOUNCER: Seen in classrooms the world over, this is CNN NEWSROOM.

TOM HAYNES, CO-HOST: Hello and welcome to this Tuesday edition of CNN NEWSROOM, everyone. I'm Tom Haynes back with you from vacation. We have lots to cover today so let's take a look at a preview.

Human cloning could soon be a reality. We'll have the details of that in our "Top Story." We talk health matters in our "Daily Desk" today. In an emergency, is your family good medicine? Up next, our "Worldview" travels take us to the United Kingdom where some farmers are at the center of a compensation controversy. Finally, we "Chronicle" the ethical debate over genetic research.

CNN has learned two scientists plan to do what's never been done before, clone human beings. A team of fertility specialists plans to impregnate 200 women with eggs containing cloned human DNA. Their work has renewed the debate that was sparked when Dolly the sheep was cloned in 1997. Human cloning experiments are banned in much of Europe and soon could be in the U.S., but the research team says it plans to conduct its work elsewhere.

CNN medical correspondent Elizabeth Cohen has the latest on what many people consider a terrifying experiment.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ELIZABETH COHEN, CNN MEDICAL CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): This man flew to Washington today to announce that in November he plans on creating 200 human clones.

DR. PANOS ZAVOS, FERTILITY EXPERT: We want the world to know that we're very confident, we know what we're doing, we've done it before -- not this type, but other technologies. And we do intend to do it right.

COHEN: Dr. Panos Zavos, a former professor at the University of Kentucky, and an international team of scientists say they've recruited 200 infertile couples. For each couple, they plan on cloning the DNA from either the husband or wife to form an embryo, then implant the embryo in the wife to start a pregnancy.

(on camera): Scientists say they're horrified by all of this, not just for ethical reasons, but for health ones, too. They say cloning experiments in animals have usually resulted in miscarriages. And of the babies that are born, the vast majority have deformities.

DR. JONATHAN HILL, CORNELL UNIVERSITY: Their liver, their lungs, their heart, their blood vessels, their placental vessels, and the placenta itself are often abnormal at birth.

COHEN (voice-over): Zavos and his team haven't said where they plan on doing the cloning, but say it won't be in the United States.

Zavos says he'll use the same technology that produced Dolly, the cloned sheep, four years ago. First, the person to be cloned donates a single cell -- say, a skin cell. Scientists then take the DNA from that cell and insert it into a human egg, which has had its DNA removed. Then a jolt of electricity causes the cell to divide, just like a normal embryo does. That embryo, which is now a completely identical copy of the original DNA donor, is implanted into a woman's womb. Zavos is scheduled to reveal these plans at a hearing of the National Academy of Science on Tuesday, and is sure to draw universal condemnation.

Elizabeth Cohen, CNN, Washington.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

HAYNES: And coming up in "Chronicle," we'll take another look at a quantum leap in science medicine, that is the mapping of the human genome. The breakthrough, which was announced last winter, has become the focus of an ethical debate.

"In the Headlines" today, a new warning for teens who like to keep their bodies looking buff. A team of researchers in New York says adolescents should avoid taking the muscle builder creatine. Creatine is a top selling nutritional supplement in the U.S. The study by the American Association of Pediatrics finds 44 percent of high school senior athletes are taking it. Creatine is most commonly used by body builders, football players and gymnasts. The American College of Sports Medicine discourages its use in anyone younger than 18 because it may interfere with normal growth. Creatine has also been linked to at least two cases of adult onset renal or kidney failure. The study on creatine can be found in the August issue "Pediatrics" magazine.

Each year almost 103 million Americans take a trip to the emergency room. In the past, family members stayed in waiting rooms during these visits. But nowadays, some hospitals are going against tradition with family presence programs, which allow family members to stay with their loved ones during emergency procedures.

Rhonda Rowland looks at the reasons behind the change.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

RHONDA ROWLAND, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): It's not uncommon -- a family member needs CPR and you are sent out of the room to wait for an update from a doctor. For Jim and Linda Lasater, it was different.

LINDA LASATER: When the time came, like I said, I started just to scoot out of the room and they said, no, don't you want to stay in here? And one nurse was on one side of me and the chaplain was on the other and the nurse was explaining everything that was happening -- from chest tubes to shocking him to everything they did to bring him around.

ROWLAND: Linda was at Jim's side in the Intensive Care Unit when his heart stopped and his doctors worked on him.

LASATER: And the whole time I just said come on Jim, come on -- come on. You're not leaving me with these kids.

ROWLAND: Some hospitals are going against tradition, allowing family members to the bedside of loved ones during resuscitation and invasive procedures such as CPR and emergency intubation. Now there's evidence published in the "American Journal of Nursing" that the presence of loved ones in medical crises provides multiple benefits for both patient and family.

DEZRA EICHHORN, TRAUMA NURSE SPECIALIST: Well, we found that patients really value having family members there. It's really positive for them. They feel comforted, supported, not so alone.

LASATER: There are other people that we have talked to that, you know, they lost their loved one, but that last minute they saw their loved one was enough to help them through the grieving process.

ROWLAND: When Ashley Keeling was hit by a car and seriously hurt, her twin sister and parents were at her bedside, even as doctors worked on her.

ASHLEY KEELING: I think it's a very positive thing, having your parents there knowing that you know that you're going to be OK.

ROWLAND: Not everyone is in favor of family presence. Emergency room physician Stephen Epstein emphasizes the importance of communication with families, but says they don't have to be in the room.

DR. STEPHEN EPSTEIN, EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN: It might be a distraction. You might wind up with a family member who thinks they're going to be all right, but then actually winds up passing out.

ROWLAND: Some doctors are concerned about liability when family members see everything, fearing they will seek blame if the patient does not survive.

Eichhorn says the benefits outweigh the risks.

EICHHORN: I feel like it's one of the most powerful interventions we can offer as health care providers because we're giving people something significant for them when there's nothing else the machinery can do. ROWLAND (on camera): Benefits aside, family presence may not be for everyone. It's up to the medical team treating the patient to assess the family and determine if they should remain with their loved one.

Rhonda Rowland, CNN.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

ANNOUNCER: Teachers, make the most of CNN NEWSROOM with our free daily classroom guide to the program. There you'll find a rundown of each day's show so you choose just the program segment that fits your lesson plan. Plus, there are discussion questions and activities and the guide highlights key people, places and news terms. Each day, find hot links to other online resources and previews of upcoming "Desk" segments.

It's all at this Web address where you can also sign up to have the guide automatically e-mailed directly to you each day. It's easy. It's free. It's your curriculum connection to the news. After all, the news never stops and neither does learning.

HAYNES: In "Worldview" today, art, animals and more. We'll focus on one of the world's most renowned artists and we'll gaze at gazelles, creatures making a comeback in Iran. We'll also take a trek to Senegal where culture and politics are finding a musical voice.

But first to Great Britain where the foot-and-mouth epidemic is still causing problems. The infectious livestock disease has already cost Britain's economy about 1.2 billion pounds, that's $1.7 billion, and it's not over yet. New cases keep on cropping up. On average, three a day. Officials say it will be months before the disease is eradicated. Meantime, a battle is raging over compensation for the slaughtered animals. More than 3 1/2 million have been put down. It's a staggering number as Robin Oakley explains.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ROBIN OAKLEY, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): The foot-and-mouth epidemic, which has brought misery to many rural areas in Britain, is causing ever sharper tensions between farmers and politicians. MPs are launching two Parliamentary inquiries into the system of compensating those whose herds have had to be slaughtered after 37 became compensation millionaires, winning payments over $1.5 million. Farmers who don't get compensated for lost business, like milk and lamb sales, are angry at the way the issue's being presented, saying the slaughtered stock is worth the money paid.

HUGH RICHARDS, FARMER: People have been paid fair compensation for the animals that they've lost. It's nothing new. They haven't asked for that money. They didn't ask for the disease. The disease have taken their animals and there is a scheme in place to compensate for them.

OAKLEY: But now the European Commission, due to foot 60 percent of the bill for compensation and cleanup costs, has told CNN that it will hold money back if it finds there's been overcompensation or fraud.

THORSTEN MUENCH, CONSUMER PROTECTION SPOKESMAN E.C.: The Commission may make on-the-spot checks, but we also have an E.U. anti- fraud office which is called OLAF, and OLAF is entitled to do checks of costs to verify if E.U.'s taxpayer's money is properly spent.

OAKLEY: Farmers' leaders say payments must not be held up.

STEVEN ROSSIDES, NATIONAL FARMERS UNION: There's nothing to hide here. I think if the E.U. authorities feel they want to look a little more closely at how the money is expended, I don't think we have a problem with that. But we would be very unhappy if in any way that held up the payment of compensation to farmers who are slaughtered out.

OAKLEY (on camera): Some MPs are accusing farmers of fiddling their valuations. They complain that manufacturers don't get the same level of help when things go wrong for them. Some farmers suspect the government, keen to deflect attention from its failure to end foot- and-mouth by now, is behind the stories of big payouts making farmers look greedy. An overall inquiry into every aspect of the epidemic now seems inevitable.

Robin Oakley, CNN, London.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

SHELLEY WALCOTT, CO-HOST: On the extreme west coast of Africa lies the country of Senegal. About eight million people live there, the majority of whom speak French, the country's official language. Senegal's capital city is Dakar, but most of the country is very rural, made up of broad plains that remain dry for most of the year. Rainfall tends to be scarce. In fact, some areas in Senegal's north experience only 10 to 20 days of rain between the months of July to September.

Senegal has a thriving cultural life. Art, sculpture, music and dance are some of the most popular forms of expression. Senegal's appreciation of the arts has inspired one musician to use his talent to try and help some of the less fortunate.

Jim Clancy has the story.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

(MUSIC)

JIM CLANCY, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): They call themselves Freedom Soldiers, and they've come to help. A group of talented African musicians who now live in Europe or Canada, back in Africa, recording an album to raise funds for refugee education.

(MUSIC)

CLANCY: These musicians are motivated. They are refugees. Their inspiration, from their own experience. SANTRICK, REFUGEE ARTIST (through translator): As a musician, I have an advantage. I can speak about these things. I can help make heard the voice of all refugees.

CLANCY: The backdrop for this project was the Dakar, Senegal on Africa's West Coast. The man behind it, celebrated Senegalese musician Youssoo N'Dour. The refugee artists spent about two weeks at Youssoo's state-of-the-art studio recording 14 tracks for this album.

YOUSSOO N'DOUR, SENEGALESE MUSICIAN (through translator): For me, music is a power, a force. And as soon as we use this force in the world, it has every chance of creating a positive image.

CLANCY: Youssoo is working with the United Nations High Commission for Refugees to build understanding and respect for all those forced from their homelands.

LUBBERS: Refugees deserve respect. And my music is an enormous possibility to make it clear -- music across cultures.

CLANCY: The project reflects that cross culture with 11 musicians from nine countries. Here there is no room for the political or ethnic differences that often made them refugees in the first place.

Jakabo (ph) and Arvay (ph) are from Rwanda, each from opposite sides of the ethnic divide blamed for Rwanda's genocide. They believe as artists, they have no choice but to work together. Arvay adds, "We both live through the difficulties. We don't have time for that anymore."

What they do have time for is building bridges. And that is the title of the album. The songs they sing tell the stories of their lives. Canan (ph), a Somali, raps about his mother's struggle to rescue her children from a conflict in Somalia in the early 1990s.

There are songs about life in exile, but there's also a message of hope.

(MUSIC)

CLANCY: Their hope is that their music will motivate people, make them aware and help them understand the plight of refugees. It's a message they're taking with them on tour in Europe this month.

(MUSIC)

(END VIDEOTAPE) (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

(MUSIC)

CLANCY (voice-over): They call themselves Freedom Soldiers, and they've come to help. A group of talented African musicians who now live in Europe or Canada, back in Africa, recording an album to raise funds for refugee education. (MUSIC)

CLANCY: These musicians are motivated. They are refugees. Their inspiration: from their own experience.

SANTRICK, REFUGEE ARTIST (through translator): As a musician, I have an advantage. I can speak about these things. I can help make heard the voice of all refugees.

CLANCY: The backdrop for this project was the Dakar, Senegal on Africa's West Coast. The man behind it, celebrated Senegalese musician Youssoo N'Dour. The refugee artist spent about two weeks at Youssoo's state-of-the-art studio recording 14 tracks for this album.

YOUSSOO N'DOUR, SENEGALESE MUSICIAN (through translator): For me, music is a power, of course. And as soon as we use this force in the world, it has every chance of creating a positive.

CLANCY: Youssoo is working with the United Nations High Commission for Refugees to build understanding and respect for all those forced from their homelands.

LUBBERS: Refugees deserve respect. And my music is an enormous possibility to make it clear -- music across cultures.

CLANCY: The project reflects that cross culture with 11 musicians from nine countries. Here there is no room for the political or ethnic differences that often made them refugees in the first place.

Jakabo (ph) and Arvay (ph) are from Rwanda, each from opposite sides of the ethnic divide blamed for Rwanda's genocide. They believe as artists, they have no choice but to work together. Arvay adds, "We both live through the difficulties. We don't have time for that anymore."

What they do have time for is building bridges. And that is the title of the album. The songs they sing tell the stories of their lives. Canan (ph), a Somali, raps about his mother's struggle to rescue her children from a conflict in Somalia in the early 1990s.

There are songs about life in exile, but there's also a message of hope.

(MUSIC)

CLANCY: Their hope is that their music will motivate people, make them aware and help them understand the plight of refugees. It's a message they're taking with them on tour in Europe this month.

(MUSIC)

CLANCY: Jim Clancy, CNN.

(END VIDEOTAPE) RUDI BAKHTIAR, CO-HOST: Now to the Middle East to the ancient land of Iran. Iran is one of the world's oldest countries with a history that dates back almost 5,000 years, including the time of the great Persian Empire. In Biblical times, this magnificent empire ruled over a huge territory, which included most of southwestern Asia and parts of Europe and Africa.

During the early 1900s, oil was discovered in the southwestern region of the country, which provided enormous wealth and helped modernize Iran. Iran's variety of snowcapped mountains, green valleys and dry deserts provides a home to an array of spectacular wildlife. Earlier in the month, we told you about the country's desperate plight to save the cheetah. Check your NEWSROOM archives for August 1.

Now, Gary Strieker has more on the country's struggle with the gazelle.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GARY STRIEKER, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): In a serious drought that has parched Iran for three years, this man has a critical mission in a vast wildlife preserve on a scorching plain in the center of the country.

Serai Golan Raza (ph) is a provincial game guard. He says protecting wildlife here means not only watching out for poachers, but also providing water supplies to sustain animals through the droughts.

The government spends serious money on this project, pumping water from deep wells and transporting it to storage tanks that supply drinking troughs in far corners of the reserve. This is diligent protection and the results are striking.

Wildlife populations are plummeting elsewhere in Iran, but despite recurring droughts, there are now more than 2,000 goitered and Jabeer gazelles in this reserve, three times as many as there were 20 years ago. But the wildlife recovery has serious repercussions for farmers just outside the reserve.

On a visit to a neighboring village, Raza's (ph) boss gets an earful from these farmers. They complain there are too many gazelles raiding their crops. They're now growing valuable pistachio trees here and when gazelles come in and chew on them, they don't produce nuts.

MOHAMMAD HAKAMI, VILLAGE ISLAMIC COUNCIL (through translator): So we believe that something has to be done to stop this damage to us. I am talking as a representative of the Islamic Council of these people, more than 4,000 people. And they all complain that the damage is too much for us to bear.

STRIEKER: The director pleads for more time. He says he's asking for money to build better fences to keep animals out of the pistachios and to plant small areas of crops inside the reserve, attracting animals away from the farms.

The farmers are still willing to cooperate but their patience is obviously wearing thin.

(on-camera): Authorities here have succeeded in restoring some wildlife numbers to the highest level in decades. But this new problem that threatens the economic interest of farmers now overshadows everything they've achieved.

(voice-over): Raza (ph) says cooperation from villagers has been essential to protection of wildlife in Mehdiabad. If that cooperation is lost, the devastation of wildlife sweeping most parts of this nation could still happen here.

Gary Strieker, CNN, Mehdiabad, Iran.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

HAYNES: It's often said to be the most famous portrait ever painted: the Mona Lisa. Can you name the artist who's known for this work?

Well, here's a hint. He was a key figure in the Renaissance. He lived in Italy in the 1400s. Besides being a painter, he is known for his scientific mind. Yes, you guessed it. Leonardo da Vinci was the first to study the flight of birds scientifically. He drew plans for hundreds of inventions and, of course, he trained as a painter. He was very interested in light and shadow and also worked diligently on perspective, technique to create the illusion of depth in artwork. Leonardo's influence on art continues today and his works are renowned around the globe.

Peter Humi looks at one drawing more than 520 years old and the impact of this master painter.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

PETER HUMI, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): It's small, only a few square inches, not much more than a doodle, really, but study the drawing carefully. It's old, obviously, and the draftsmanship is stunning.

NICOLAS SCHWED, CHRISTIE'S PARIS: There's a great number of drawings of horses he did and horses was something particularly difficult to draw for Renaissance artists because you couldn't really see the movement of horses when they walked, just too fast. And the way that it has (ph) by drawing a different set of legs. As you can see, about three or four sets of legs in the back showing the movements.

HUMI: Here was an artist ahead of his times. Leonardo da Vinci, painter, sculpture, scientist, engineer and theorist. The Horse and Rider was a preparatory study drawn on parchment in about 1480 when Leonardo was in his late 20s, figures which were to be incorporated in a painting depicting the adoration of the Magi shortly after the birth of Jesus.

(on camera): A sketch all the more remarkable because using a technique common to the times, Leonardo couldn't actually see what he was drawing.

(voice-over): He used what is known as silver point, literally a small block of silver.

SCHWED: What's very difficult with this technique is when you made your drawing, you don't see what you draw. You only see it when the silver oxidizes which takes a few minutes.

HUMI: But Leonardo, of course, was a genius and the technique didn't slow him down. In fact, speed was of the essence and he rarely ever completed any of his works. The Horse and Rider sketch is considered the most important Leonardo work to be sold at auction since the 1930s.

Peter Humi, CNN, Paris.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

HAYNES: The painting was sold at auction in July at Christie's in London. It sold for $11.4 million. That was a world record price for a Leonardo, whose works are rarely sold at auction. The tiny drawing was sold to an anonymous telephone bidder.

Understanding the human body right down to the last gene undoubtedly has advantages, particularly for medical specialists, but it also is fraught with social implications.

CNN NEWSROOM's Joel Hochmuth looks at a few of those implications and the social and ethical questions involved in mapping the human genome.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Congratulations.

JOEL HOCHMUTH, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): It is, by all accounts, an extraordinary scientific breakthrough.

ERIC LANDER, GENETIC RESEARCHER: The text is filled with long- sought answers, some amazing surprises, puzzling mysteries and lots of useful information for medicine.

HOCHMUTH: This winter, two rival groups of researchers announced they had decoded the billions of chemical combinations that make up who we are: the human genome. The developments hold the promise of improving human life in ways that, until now, doctors could only dream about.

LANDER: And I think it means that we will now be able to try to track down the actual causes of disease. With a parts list, I think the next decade will see us nail down the causes. And while causes don't guarantee that we're going to have cures, they sure beat ignorance when we're trying to tackle disease.

HOCHMUTH: In many ways, the future is here. Doctors can already examine the genetic makeup of human embryos before pregnancy during the in vitro fertilization process. Researchers have already identified genetic markers for more than a dozen diseases, including types of hemophilia, cystic fibrosis and Huntington's disease. Couples can choose to implant only embryos that appear to be free of these abnormalities and discard the rest. But this raises a major ethical question.

RICH RUFFALO, PARALYMPIC ATHLETE: Who's to say which imperfection deserves to live and which imperfection is too heinous or too difficult to enjoy the right to life?

HOCHMUTH: Rich Ruffalo is a Paralympic athlete from New Jersey, who has won dozens of track and field medals both nationally and internationally.

RUFFALO: Hit another one?

SARAH RUFFALO (ph), DAUGHTER OF RICH RUFFALO: Yes.

RUFFALO: Give me another one.

HOCHMUTH: He's been blind for nearly 20 years now, after gradually losing his sight to a degenerative disease called retinitis pigmentosa or RP. Turns out, RP is one of those diseases that doctors can now find in an embryo before it's implanted.

RUFFALO: If my parents, way back in 1950, when my mom was pregnant and I was circling for a landing, if you will -- if somebody asked her: "Mrs. Ruffalo, you know, we've done some screening. We found out your son, when he's born, one day he'll go blind" -- boy, I'm awful glad she wasn't posed with that question. Although I think, knowing my mom, I'd still be here.

HOCHMUTH: Ruffalo and his wife, Diane, have not had their daughter Sarah tested for RP. Of course, they really don't need to. Although Sarah is a carrier of the disease, due to genetic factors, it's highly improbable she'd ever develop it. Still, Ruffalo hopes she can learn from his example.

RUFFALO: Yes, there is life after blindness. There's life after adversity. There's life after disease. And it's what you make of it. It's not the quantity of your life, it's the quality of it. And we could all make a difference for other people and that enhances the quality of everyone's life.

HOCHMUTH (on camera): It's clear genetic research will pose even more ethical questions in the future. On the distant horizon is gene therapy, which would let doctors fix defective genes rather than simply identify them. In theory, couples wouldn't have to make the difficult choice between which embryos live and which ones die.

But if doctors can manipulate genes to prevent disease, couldn't they also manipulate genes to make people smarter, better looking or live longer?

(voice-over): Hollywood has had a field day with that scenario.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, "GATTACA")

ETHAN HAWKE, ACTOR: Like most other parents of their day, they were determined that their next child would be brought into the world in what has become the natural way.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HOCHMUTH: "Gattaca," a movie released four years ago, depicts a society deeply divided by class: those who have been genetically engineered and those who haven't.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, "GATTACA")

BLAIR UNDERWOOD, ACTOR: After screening, we are left, as you see, with two healthy boys and two very healthy girls -- naturally, no critical predispositions to any of the major inheritable diseases. All that remains is to select the most compatible candidate.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HOCHMUTH: Could it happen?

DR. HILTON KORT, FERTILITY SPECIALIST: I don't think that will ever happen in our lifetime, because I think the technology will not be available. But, more importantly, I think when that technology does become available, we will have the appropriate controls, whether it be legislation or whether it be controls.

And I think, in -- certainly, in our society, I can never see that happening.

HOCHMUTH: Still, just the idea of genetic engineering makes ethicists nervous. Already, it's possible to screen embryos for gender so couples can choose to have a boy or a girl.

TIMOTHY JACKSON, PROF. OF CHRISTIAN ETHICS, EMORY UNIV.: We really make life a product rather than seeing life as a gift of God that is due reverence. We see life as a product of human manipulation that, especially if it's still in the embryonic stage, that can be manipulated for social utility.

HOCHMUTH: Perhaps there are two ways of looking at genetic engineering. To some, it's simply parents choosing the best for their children. To others, it's parents choosing the best children for themselves.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP, "GATTACA")

UNDERWOOD: Keep in mind, this child is still you -- simply the best of you.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

JACKSON: Why not try to rationalize the process to make newer and better future generations rather than leaving it to chance? Here I know only to say that it raises the fundamental question: What is the origin of life? What is the source of life?

(END VIDEOTAPE)

HAYNES: That is CNN NEWSROOM for Tuesday. Thanks for watching, and we'll see you back here tomorrow.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com

 Search   




MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 














Back to the top