Skip to main content
CNN.com /TRANSCRIPTS

CNN TV
EDITIONS





CNN LIVE THIS MORNING

America's New War: Terrorist Documents Found Describe Rules of Engagement

Aired September 28, 2001 - 09:01   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
PAULA ZAHN, CNN ANCHOR: On the investigative front, the director of the FBI says one or more of the suspected hijackers had ties to the terrorist network run by Osama bin Laden.

Now, let's go right now to the investigation these of attacks.

Our own Susan Candiotti is in Miami. She has information on those documents found in the car of two suspected terrorists -- Susan.

SUSAN CANDIOTTI, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Hello, Paula.

One source describes those documents as rules of engagement, how to carry out their mission, how to prepare to die, to put them in sort of the right mental zone.

Investigators found the document, a photocopy, among the belongings left behind by Mohammed Atta, believed to have piloted the first plane that hit the World Trade Center. It's originally hand written in Arabic, author unknown. Among the instructions, a source tells CNN, these words: "Strike your enemy above his neck." Much of the document includes rudimentary rules for a terrorist, how to dress, how to get a taxi, be on time.

The "Washington Post" in today's editions quoted additional excerpts: "Check all of your items, your bag, your clothes, knifes, your will, your IDs, your passport, all your papers." It continues: "Make sure that nobody is following you."

A source told us the document contains paragraph after paragraph of spiritual messages, asking God for guidance. Under a section called "The Last Night" the "Washington Post" said there was a promise of everlasting life. It ends this way: "We are of God, and to God we return."

Now, both "Washington Post" and "Dallas Morning News" also report that this similar document was found among the wreckage of another plane that was hijacked, the doomed flight that crashed in Pennsylvania -- Paula.

ZAHN: Susan do we know that if Atta left anything else behind of significance?

CANDIOTTI: We do. Sources tell us that among his belongings they also found the names and phone numbers of possible associates; obviously, that would be a critical lead and is being followed up on. Now, why he would leave something behind, no one knows.

ZAHN: But, Susan, going back to this primer on how these suspected hijackers were supposed to spend their last days, is there -- I know those bags didn't make it on the plane from Portland, Maine to Boston. Is there any suggestion that these documents were purposely left behind or just as a result of the bag not making it on the plane?

CANDIOTTI: It would appear it's because the bag simply didn't make the flight, but because we now have those documents, the authorities have those documents in their possession, obviously, it gives them incredible insight into what their thinking was and as they continue to look for other associates to see if they can shed more light on this.

ZAHN: OK. Susan, thanks so much for that update, fascinating.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com


 
 
 
 


 Search   

Back to the top