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CNN LIVE EVENT/SPECIAL

Terrorist Attacks Spark Sex and Commitment

Aired October 23, 2001 - 06:23   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
DARYN KAGAN, CNN ANCHOR: Well, I imagine you've heard the expression, "Make love not war." Have you heard that?

LEON HARRIS, CNN ANCHOR: I have heard that, not recently,...

KAGAN: Well apparently...

HARRIS: ... but I have heard it.

KAGAN: Apparently, and I just hear this, but that has been happening a lot since September 11.

HARRIS: Not that you would know.

KAGAN: Not -- I'm not commenting on that.

HARRIS: Not that you would know.

OK, Genevieve Motiman (ph) of CTV at Montreal, Quebec has heard about it, and she's got everything you want to know now about the birds and the bees of war but were embarrassed to ask.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GENEVIEVE MOTIMAN, CTV REPORTER (voice-over): At this bar, pickup lines are common, even more so since September 11.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That particular day you wanted to have that touchy-feely, you know like stay close-feely -- feeling type of thing.

MOTIMAN: Dr. Pierre Assalian runs a sex clinic. He says a feeling of vulnerability may have pushed post-terrorist attacks sex drives into overdrive.

DR. PIERRE ASSALIAN, MONTREAL GENERAL HOSPITAL: Maybe to ward off, to deal with this fear of that "I may die, I may be destroyed."

DR. PEPPER SCHWARTZ, AUTHOR: They want to feel physical, they want to feel alive.

MOTIMAN: Dr. Pepper Schwartz is also an expert. She has written a dozen books on sexuality and teaches sociology. Schwartz says since September 11, she's heard plenty of sex talk. SCHWARTZ: Had lots and lots of people tell me, unsolicited, believe it or not, that they feel like going out and sleeping with strangers -- just having sex with people.

MOTIMAN: Spontaneous sex which she predicts will lead to a mini- baby boom across North America. It has happened in more limited ways before, after the eruption of Mount Saint Helens and in Quebec after the ice storm of 1998.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Well, it was a nice surprise and we're very happy to have her.

MOTIMAN: Many seek more than just sex. Ruth Claremont is a matchmaker. She's set up dates for over 16 years. Her business is booming.

RUTH CLAREMONT, MATCHMAKER: Think of the people who were in the -- in New York and they called their loved ones. I mean maybe they're thinking who would I call if I was in that situation if they didn't have anyone.

MOTIMAN (on camera): The evidence is still anecdotal, but it looks as though marriage proposals are on the rise. The wedding industry should prepare for a boom within the next few months.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Go for a kiss, guys.

MOTIMAN (voice-over): And some say this change of attitude may last.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And they'll just have more of an intimate relationship with them aside from the sexual. It's not just one facet, it's everything so -- and you know, if the sex comes after that, yes.

MOTIMAN: Seeking comfort in one another.

Genevieve Motiman, CTV News, Montreal.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAGAN: See that, maybe you have to start saving up for my wedding present.

HARRIS: OK, I'll keep -- I'll write that one down.

KAGAN: You write that one down.

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