Skip to main content
CNN.com /TRANSCRIPTS

CNN TV
EDITIONS





AMERICAN MORNING WITH PAULA ZAHN

Something New With Sliced Bread

Aired May 10, 2002 - 08:57   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
PAULA ZAHN, CNN ANCHOR: I'm sure you've heard that stale old saying, "the best thing that's happened since sliced bread." Now there is something new with sliced bread itself.

And CNN's Jeanne Moos reports on whether this bread's a winner.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JEANNE MOOS, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): When it comes to bread, it's the new toast of the town.

(on camera): Crustless bread.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: You're kidding?

MOOS (voice-over): Nope, bread that comes straight from the bag minus the crust. Sara Lee Bakery estimates 30 to 40 percent of kids don't want crust.

(on camera): Does he always get you to cut it?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes, he tears it off himself.

MOOS (voice-over): But now, Sara Lee will do it for him. The bread starts out oversized. The crust is sheered off in a decrustacean room at the company's Texas plant. Does this mean folks have become such loafers they can't cut off their own crusts?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I think it says that moms are busy, they have better things to do with their time.

(on camera): Ready, get set, slice!

(voice-over): Just imagine all the things can you do with the time you save per kid, per sandwich. Six seconds.

Iron Kids' (ph) crustless bread was introduced at a supermarket convention in Chicago.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You won't get crust under your nails anymore.

MOOS: But kids are the real test.

(on camera): Have a seat right here. (voice-over): And trying to do a taste test with kids...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You want to see some cool bread?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No.

MOOS: ... isn't easy. They either take too much or not any. Or their mouths are full of candy.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I'm going to taste it when I'm done with my candy. I have gum.

MOOS (on camera): Could you hold your gum for a minute and try the bread?

(voice-over): Some took part reluctantly. Others wanted bread, but no press.

Amos hid behind his crustless bread.

(on camera): What's the difference between those two?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: One of them has stuff on the outside, and one of them don't.

MOOS (voice-over): Crustless reminds us of those dainty finger sandwiches served during tea at the Waldorf Astoria. Instead of fingers, kids tend to use whole hands.

Crustless bread will sell from anywhere from $2.50 to over $3 a loaf. What's next, crustless pizza?

And what's so bad about crust anyway? Is it that it's hard? Is it that you don't like it color? I mean, what is wrong with the crust?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I don't like it.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I like the new kind of bread better.

MOOS (on camera): You like the old one, and you like the new one?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It's yummy.

MOOS (voice-over): The crust that's removed will end up as animal feed, or breading or croutons.

This girl's slice went to her hair.

(on camera): Wait a minute, you've got crustless bread in your hair.

(voice-over): At least the new bread didn't leave anyone crust- fallen.

(on camera): Crust, did you ever hear that word, crust?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Crust.

MOOS: Jeanne Moos, CNN, New York.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.fdch.com





 
 
 
 


 Search   

Back to the top