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YOUR WORLD TODAY

NASA Holds Press Conference; London on Alert; Egypt Bomber Suspect Identified

Aired July 26, 2005 - 11:59   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


ZAIN VERJEE, CNN INTERNATIONAL ANCHOR: This is YOUR WORLD TODAY. NASA is holding a press conference. We want to go to it live right now after the successful launch of Space Shuttle Discovery.
(JOINED IN PROGRESS)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We're going to have some brief remarks from our folks up here, and then we'll go to questions. Again, I'd like you to, as standard procedure, please identify yourself and your affiliate before asking a question.

Let me introduce our briefing members today.

To my left is Michael Griffin, NASA administrator. To his left, William Reedy, associate administrator for space operations. To his left, Bill Parsons, space shuttle program manager. To his left, Wayne Hale, deputy space -- deputy program manager for the space shuttle program. And to his left, Mike Leinbach, shuttle launch director.

As I said, a few brief remarks and then we'll get to some questions.

Mr. Administrator.

MICHAEL GRIFFIN, NASA ADMINISTRATOR: Thank you, Dean. And thanks to all of you here.

I'll keep my opening remarks brief, but I want to use them to ask you all to take note of what you saw here today: the power and the majesty of the launch, of course, but also the competence and the professionalism, the sheer gall, the pluckiness, the grittiness of this team that pulled this program out of the depths of despair two- and-a-half years ago and made it fly. I want you to think about what it takes to get millions of different parts from thousands of vendors across the country to work together to produce what you saw here today to realize how chancy it is, how difficult it is, and what a primitive state of technology it still is.

And this team managed to do it. And I think a large debt of appreciation is due to them. They have worked as hard asny team in NASA history to get what you -- to produce what you saw today.

Thank you.

WILLIAM REEDY, NASA ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR SPACE OPERATIONS: Amen. This has been a total team effort since the very beginning two- and-a-half years ago, and as all of you have followed along with us, it's been a struggle, a constant struggle to overcome an awful lot of things.

What you didn't see out on the launch pad today was the fact that Atlantis is stacked in the VAB ready to go. We've accomplished a tremendous amount, but this is the launch.

We've got 12 days of orbit operations to do, and then we've got to get Discovery and her crew safely back home. I think today Mother Nature smiled on us, and I also think the Columbia crew smiled on us. We owe them and their families a debt of gratitude, the entire NASA family does.

And to get Eileen and her crew up safely in orbit today with a pristine vehicle and a superb count, I just can't say enough good things about the team that I've been fortunate to be associated with -- Bill.

BILL PARSONS, SPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM MANAGER: I'd just like to send a personal thanks to all our shuttle program folks, the NASA workers, the contractors, the NASA centers that jumped in and helped us out, solved so many technical problems. You just can't believe what an effort this was for this agency. And I can't tell you how much support this program got in our -- in our effort.

And I just echo what Bill said. We've still got some work to do, and then we'll bring the crew home safely and we'll fly another one. So I really -- again, I just can't tell what you this means today.

WAYNE HALE, DEPUTY PROGRAM MANAGER: I don't know how to begin. My heart's been in my throat all morning. It's been a great day. And to think that here we are today with Americans back in flight on an American vehicle, it's just a tremendous step. And it will be the first in many steps as we head out into the exploration of the solar system back to the moon and on to Mars.

And this team showed the kind of spirit and dedication to overcome difficulties that that is going to take. And I couldn't be more proud of them.

It's a great day.

MIKE LEINBACH, SHUTTLE LAUNCH DIRECTOR: At times like this I get to represent the launch team and really all of Kennedy Space Center. And I just wish you all could have been in the lobby of the launch control center when we were enjoying our beans and cornbread that we hadn't enjoyed in over two-and-a-half years.

The mood was just giddy. People were just slapping each other on the back. And there will be only one thing better than today's launch, and that will be the landing in 12 days.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right. That will be it for our opening remarks. We'll now take questions. And please identify yourself and your affiliate.

Let's go right here in the blue shirt, Jay Barberie

JAY BARBERIE, NBC: Jay Barberie with NBC.

First, let me ask you a question as a journalist. Did you see any debris or anything come off today in your early -- early tapes? And as a non-journalist who has covered all 145 missions, magnificent. OK?

Did you see any debris?

HALE: Well, let me just say, I talked with the two senior members of the photo imagery group that were on their way to review the imagery. It's a little early to make comments on what's going on. You know, you have to have some experience and some knowledge to be able to interpret the photography.

I did get an early report before we left the firing room from the radar team that said they saw no tracks prior to SRB sep. And of course the SRB sep, we put off booster covers and different things that we know come off.

So, so far, I think the best shot was that shot of the external tank looking back at the orbiters that flew away. And it looked really good to me.

We'll have to see though. The guys are going over that frame by frame. And tomorrow, you know, we'll have a better story for you.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right. Along the wall, let's go with Mike -- Mike Cabbage.

MIKE CABBAGE, "ORLANDO SENTINEL": Mike Cabbage, with "The Orlando Sentinel."

To follow up on Jay's question, it appears someone who's not an expert certainly from watching the film from the ET camera that right after the solid rocket boosters separate, that there's clearly some kind of a debris event. It doesn't appear to strike the orbiter, but it does look like it's a large piece of debris.

Have you gotten any additional information on what that could be, where it could have come from, and what's going on with it?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No. No. Waiting for the experts to come back and tell us.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right.

Next question. Right there in front, blue shirt.

STEVE SIMON, KHWB: Steve Simon with KHWB TV in Houston.

The sensors worked today. What's your reaction to that? And do you feel like you can finally put this to bed as an unexplained anomaly, as you call it?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Is that for me?

SIMON: That's for you. That's fine.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I'm a little disappointed. I'll be very honest with you.

Having worked through the rationale and satisfied ourselves right up -- right up to including me, that we were good to go with three of four, I said the other day, and I meant it, I wanted the one that failed the other day to fail again because we had some diagnostic procedures in place today. And maybe, maybe we could have removed the U from the UA and turned it into an EA. And that would have been nice to do.

So now we're in the position that I think Mike Leinbach said earlier, we have an unexplained resolution.

(LAUGHTER)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And I guess that's good. But engineers don't like the unexplained. And now the evidence is -- or at least half the evidence is gone, never to be seen again.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right. Let's stay back along the wall -- Tracy.

TRACY WATSON, "USA TODAY": Tracy Watson, "USA Today."

I guess for Mr. Hale. Were you relieved to see by the end of the countdown that the sensors were all working right?

HALE: It's always good to have a clean vehicle where everything's working right, so yes, I was very pleased.

WATSON: Were you surprised?

HALE: I -- no. I kind of thought that might happen. So...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I'll tell you, we had a very detailed trouble-shooting plan that we ran through today. And try as we might, we were not able to make an ecosensor fail today. So it was -- it was a good feeling.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Worked hard at it, huh?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That's right.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Second row, blue shirt -- Tom.

TOM COSTELLO, NBC NEWS: Thank you very much. Tom Costello from NBC News.

Was there anything at all today that didn't go as picture perfect as it appeared to have gone to all of us watching?

VERJEE: Today, Mother Nature smiled on us and the Columbia crew smiled on us. NASA's holding a press conference at this moment, where they acknowledge the power and the majesty of the launch because of the sheer gall, they said, of this team that pulled the program from the depths of despair and made it fly. It is, they said, a great day.

Miles O'Brien was there to witness this day. He joins us now.

Miles, it took two-and-a-half years to get to this day. What does it mean for those at NASA? What does it mean for the astronauts?

MILES O'BRIEN, CNN SPACE CORRESPONDENT: Well, it means a lot because of the full context in which it is set, Zain. If you think about it for a moment, what you have to remember is, there is a date certain at which the shuttles will not fly any longer. That's in 2010. That isn't a lot of time.

If they can fly 12-15 missions, that would be actually pretty aggressive. So this is the beginning of the end of the shuttle program. And all the majesty they talk of and the giddiness they have is met with an undercurrent of anxiety about what happens next.

On the one hand, everybody's excited about the prospects here about possibly returning to the moon or a mission to Mars maybe some day. But this is, after all, why people come to work here, to work on the space shuttle. And that's the way it's been for almost 25 years now.

And so while they're excited and "giddy" is the term I heard to see it fly once again, they know it's the beginning of an end of an era, Zain. And while that new era may be exciting, it is the unknown. You know, people -- people here are used to dealing with the unknown, but this is a different kind of unknown.

VERJEE: At the press conference, it was the debris, whether there was any debris that had come off. That was raised. And the response was, look, we didn't see anything, but we have to go frame by frame and interpret the photographic images. Tell us a little bit about that process, how long it takes, and clearly how it important it is.

O'BRIEN: Well, I can tell you, we here at CNN are doing the same thing. We're going through it frame by frame as well.

They have -- NASA has in excess of 100 cameras. Some of them based in the ground, some of them in the air, some of them, as you saw, on the external fuel tank, some of them in the shuttle. On and on it goes. Some of them high definition television, 70 millimeter film, on and on. The resolution is tremendous, and the money spent on this is in several million-dollar range. And so what it will provide is a tremendous amount of data and multiple angles of the vehicle as it rose towards space, so that if, in fact, that debris event, whatever you want to call it, that occurred right around as those solid rocket boosters came off, if that is of any consequence, they will know about it.

Now, maybe it didn't hit the orbiter. Maybe it didn't cause any damage. Maybe it fell harmlessly. That wouldn't necessarily cause a big problem, as you might understand.

I mean, they knew the debris was going to come off. The question is, was it debris that would cause harm to the orbiter?

So there's a whole series of viewings that are going on under way right now, even beginning as we speak. They're looking at the first initial videotape, and that process will continue. And as it does, we'll get a very clear picture of the health of the space shuttle, really unprecedented. This has never happened in the previous 113 missions -- Zain.

VERJEE: Miles O'Brien, thanks a lot.

JIM CLANCY, CNN INTERNATIONAL ANCHOR: All right. We're going to continue to cover what's going on out in space with the space shuttle. But for right now, we want to look at some of our major stories now.

Both Britain and Egypt reeling, of course, under the recent terror attacks that targeted their nations, their peoples. We're going to focus on several developments.

VERJEE: The British prime minister, Tony Blair, says the world must confront extremist ideology to defeat terrorism. In a lengthy press briefing earlier, a defiant and resolute prime minister said there is no justification for suicide bombings anywhere in the world as British police focus on new leads in London.

CLANCY: Now, the investigation also continuing in Egypt. Security officials there say they have identified at least one of the men responsible for the Sharm el-Sheikh bombings. We're going to have a live report from the region.

All right. Let's look closer at the situation in London. That's where European political editor Robin Oakley has more on Mr. Blair's comments this day.

And Robin, certainly nobody is disagreeing with the prime minister when he says you have to stand up to terrorism. At the same time, many people are questioning the wisdom of the war in Iraq.

ROBIN OAKLEY, CNN EUROPEAN POLITICAL EDITOR: Well, certainly, Jim. And that was one of the questions that Tony Blair has had to face up to today.

As the search goes on for the four men whose faces, at least, have been identified in the latest wave of attempted suicide bombings in London, so the political moves are going on, too, to try and prevent more occurrences of this kind in the future. Tony Blair today met the leaders of other parties to help move forward on anti- terrorist legislation, and he also had the chance at that lengthy press conference to have his say on a lot of the issues surrounding the basic questions of terrorism.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

OAKLEY (voice-over): At his first monthly session with reporters since London's subway was bombed, Tony Blair was angry, passionate and determined never to compromise with terrorists.

TONY BLAIR, BRITISH PRIME MINISTER: I do not believe we should give one inch to them. Not in this country and the way we live our lives here, not in Iraq, not in Afghanistan, not in our support for two states, Israel and Palestinian, not in our support for the alliances we choose, including with America.

OAKLEY: Unlike the Irish Republican Army, said Mr. Blair, today's terrorists had aims nobody could ever negotiate on. And he revealed the moment in 2001 when the world had changed for him.

BLAIR: September the 11th for me was a wake-up call. Do you know what I think the problem is? That a lot of the world woke up for a short time and then turned over and went back to sleep again.

And we are not going to deal with this problem with the roots as deep as they are until we confront these people at every single level. And not just their methods, but their ideas.

OAKLEY: Questioned persistently on whether he's increased the danger for Britain by going to war in Iraq, Mr. Blair conceded the terrorists might use it as a propaganda issue. But he scorned the motives of the suicide bombers.

BLAIR: If it's concern for Iraq, why are they driving a car bomb into the middle of a group of children and killing them?

OAKLEY: There was never, he said, any justification for a suicide bombing in Britain or anywhere else.

Earlier, Mr. Blair met leaders of the main opposition parties to agree a way forward on new anti-terrorist laws. He defended plans to allow the deportation of radical preachers who glorified terrorism.

BLAIR: I think it's perfectly reasonable to say that if somebody is inciting terrorism here in this country, I'm sorry, you can go and do that elsewhere, thank you. You're not doing it here.

OAKLEY: The other party leaders signaled their approval of a wide package, but they have reservations about a request from the police to be allowed to hold terrorist suspects up to three months without charge.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We see very considerable difficulties in that. That's a long time to hold someone without charge and possibly just release them after that.

OAKLEY: But both he and the liberal democrats leader promised to do everything they could to maintain consensus.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

OAKLEY: Politicians in all parties are determined not to rush any new legislation and to maintain Britain's traditional balance between civil liberties and protecting the citizen. And above all else, they're determined in their response to the bombers not to do anything which would give the terrorists a victory by dividing society -- Jim.

CLANCY: How much pressure are the police coming under now? There are four suspected bombers, people who tried to detonate bombs on London's mass transit system, that seem to be at large. How much pressure on them to apprehend them?

OAKLEY: Huge pressure, Jim, because London, while being stoic in the face of the first round of bombs and the second attempt, a lot of people are very nervous on public transport at the moment. There is huge pressure on the police, and, of course, pressure in two ways, because of the sad killing of the young Brazilian electrician who was taken for a terrorist bomber and who was perfectly innocent and who was killed by the police. But as Tony Blair has said, the police would have been equally criticized if they had failed in those circumstances to apprehend or to stop a terrorist bomber -- Jim.

CLANCY: All right. Robin Oakley, our senior political editor there in Europe. Thank you, as always, Robin.

VERJEE: As Robin was saying, British authorities hunting for the suspects behind last Thursday's botched bomb attacks, they've seized a car believed to have been used by one of the men. They're also examining suspicious material found at a north London flat.

The apartment's registered to 24-year-old Yasin Hassan Omar, who came to Britain from Somalia. Police identified a second suspect, Muktar Said Ibrahim, who visited that apartment recently. Ibrahim came to Britain from Eritrea.

Police are still looking for all four suspects in last Thursday's attempt. Police have found a fifth bomb, but it's not really clear if they're searching for a fifth bomber.

CLANCY: Well, meantime, Egyptian security officials say they have identified at least one of the men responsible for the Sharm el- Sheikh bombings. Those sources say he is an Egyptian, he has ties to Islamist groups, and he carried out the attack on Ghazala Gardens Hotel. Police are questioning the man's family, trying to determine who he might have associated with.

In another development, authorities are ruling out some people as suspects.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

HUSSEIN HARIDY, EGYPTIAN AMBASSADOR TO PAKISTAN (through translator): I got in touch with the Pakistani government late last night, and I informed them officially that Cairo, the Egyptian government, denies the involvement of any Pakistani citizen in the Sharm el-Sheikh explosions.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CLANCY: Well, Egyptian police have been circulating the pictures of five missing Pakistanis. They say, however, that they've been tracking those men since before Saturday's bombings. We're going to take a short break. Coming up next on CNN, it is a heat wave.

VERJEE: Americans try to beat the heat. More on that and other stories making news in the United States after this.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

CLANCY: Welcome back to YOUR WORLD TODAY. We're going to check in on some of the stories making news in the U.S., where there has been a blistering heat wave across the Midwest.

A large swathe of the U.S. now suffering from temperatures more than 100 degrees Fahrenheit or 60 degrees Celsius. People are cranking up air-conditioners, heading out to swimming pools. Emergency workers trying to keep a close eye on the elderly and others who might suffer health problems.

Four Boy Scout leaders died in an electrical accident on the first day of the organization's national jamboree gathering near Bowling Green, Virginia. Another Boy Scout leader and a contract worker were injured. They're listed in stable condition.

They were apparently electrocuted, those who were killed, when a tent pole they were installing struck an overhead power line. The accident is under investigation.

The mother of Natalee Holloway now offering a $1 million reward for the safe return of her 18-year-old daughter. The American teenager disappeared from Aruba nearly two months ago. Meantime, the FBI says Aruban authorities have turned over a variety of documents, including transcripts of their interrogation of the 17-year-old son of an Aruban judge, the only suspect who remains jailed in the case.

VERJEE: Still ahead on CNN International, labor unrest in India.

CLANCY: Police in the capital cracking down on hundreds of striking workers. Events then spiral out of control and images are captured on videotape.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

VERJEE: In India, fresh demonstrations erupted in New Delhi a day after dramatic TV images showed hundreds of policemen beating up protesting workers. On Monday, about 100 workers were injured after a march turned violent. The workers were demanding the reinstatement of some sacked colleagues.

The clashes began after workers beat up a lone policeman after police reinforcements arrived. It was the workers who were on the receiving end. A full inquiry has now been ordered into Monday's violence.

CLANCY: Well, let's check and see how the markets in the U.S. are doing. And for that, it's over to Valerie Morris in New York City. (STOCK MARKET REPORT)

CLANCY: We're going to have a roundup of the main stories coming up in a moment.

VERJEE: And also ahead, talks to make North Korea nuclear-free resume in a more positive atmosphere. But what are the chances real progress can be made? We'll bring you in-depth analysis next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

ZAIN VERJEE, CNN INTERNATIONAL ANCHOR: This is YOUR WORLD TODAY. NASA is holding a press conference. We want to go to it live right now after the successful launch of Space Shuttle Discovery.

(JOINED IN PROGRESS)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We're going to have some brief remarks from our folks up here, and then we'll go to questions. Again, I'd like you to, as standard procedure, please identify yourself and your affiliate before asking a question.

Let me introduce our briefing members today.

To my left is Michael Griffin, NASA administrator. To his left, William Reedy, associate administrator for space operations. To his left, Bill Parsons, space shuttle program manager. To his left, Wayne Hale, deputy space -- deputy program manager for the space shuttle program. And to his left, Mike Leinbach, shuttle launch director.

As I said, a few brief remarks and then we'll get to some questions.

Mr. Administrator.

MICHAEL GRIFFIN, NASA ADMINISTRATOR: Thank you, Dean. And thanks to all of you here.

I'll keep my opening remarks brief, but I want to use them to ask you all to take note of what you saw here today: the power and the majesty of the launch, of course, but also the competence and the professionalism, the sheer gall, the pluckiness, the grittiness of this team that pulled this program out of the depths of despair two- and-a-half years ago and made it fly. I want you to think about what it takes to get millions of different parts from thousands of vendors across the country to work together to produce what you saw here today to realize how chancy it is, how difficult it is, and what a primitive state of technology it still is.

And this team managed to do it. And I think a large debt of appreciation is due to them. They have worked as hard asny team in NASA history to get what you -- to produce what you saw today. Thank you.

WILLIAM REEDY, NASA ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR SPACE OPERATIONS: Amen. This has been a total team effort since the very beginning two- and-a-half years ago, and as all of you have followed along with us, it's been a struggle, a constant struggle to overcome an awful lot of things.

What you didn't see out on the launch pad today was the fact that Atlantis is stacked in the VAB ready to go. We've accomplished a tremendous amount, but this is the launch.

We've got 12 days of orbit operations to do, and then we've got to get Discovery and her crew safely back home. I think today Mother Nature smiled on us, and I also think the Columbia crew smiled on us. We owe them and their families a debt of gratitude, the entire NASA family does.

And to get Eileen and her crew up safely in orbit today with a pristine vehicle and a superb count, I just can't say enough good things about the team that I've been fortunate to be associated with -- Bill.

BILL PARSONS, SPACE SHUTTLE PROGRAM MANAGER: I'd just like to send a personal thanks to all our shuttle program folks, the NASA workers, the contractors, the NASA centers that jumped in and helped us out, solved so many technical problems. You just can't believe what an effort this was for this agency. And I can't tell you how much support this program got in our -- in our effort.

And I just echo what Bill said. We've still got some work to do, and then we'll bring the crew home safely and we'll fly another one. So I really -- again, I just can't tell what you this means today.

WAYNE HALE, DEPUTY PROGRAM MANAGER: I don't know how to begin. My heart's been in my throat all morning. It's been a great day. And to think that here we are today with Americans back in flight on an American vehicle, it's just a tremendous step. And it will be the first in many steps as we head out into the exploration of the solar system back to the moon and on to Mars.

And this team showed the kind of spirit and dedication to overcome difficulties that that is going to take. And I couldn't be more proud of them.

It's a great day.

MIKE LEINBACH, SHUTTLE LAUNCH DIRECTOR: At times like this I get to represent the launch team and really all of Kennedy Space Center. And I just wish you all could have been in the lobby of the launch control center when we were enjoying our beans and cornbread that we hadn't enjoyed in over two-and-a-half years.

The mood was just giddy. People were just slapping each other on the back. And there will be only one thing better than today's launch, and that will be the landing in 12 days. UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right. That will be it for our opening remarks. We'll now take questions. And please identify yourself and your affiliate.

Let's go right here in the blue shirt, Jay Barberie

JAY BARBERIE, NBC: Jay Barberie with NBC.

First, let me ask you a question as a journalist. Did you see any debris or anything come off today in your early -- early tapes? And as a non-journalist who has covered all 145 missions, magnificent. OK?

Did you see any debris?

HALE: Well, let me just say, I talked with the two senior members of the photo imagery group that were on their way to review the imagery. It's a little early to make comments on what's going on. You know, you have to have some experience and some knowledge to be able to interpret the photography.

I did get an early report before we left the firing room from the radar team that said they saw no tracks prior to SRB sep. And of course the SRB sep, we put off booster covers and different things that we know come off.

So, so far, I think the best shot was that shot of the external tank looking back at the orbiters that flew away. And it looked really good to me.

We'll have to see though. The guys are going over that frame by frame. And tomorrow, you know, we'll have a better story for you.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right. Along the wall, let's go with Mike -- Mike Cabbage.

MIKE CABBAGE, "ORLANDO SENTINEL": Mike Cabbage, with "The Orlando Sentinel."

To follow up on Jay's question, it appears someone who's not an expert certainly from watching the film from the ET camera that right after the solid rocket boosters separate, that there's clearly some kind of a debris event. It doesn't appear to strike the orbiter, but it does look like it's a large piece of debris.

Have you gotten any additional information on what that could be, where it could have come from, and what's going on with it?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: No. No. Waiting for the experts to come back and tell us.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right.

Next question. Right there in front, blue shirt.

STEVE SIMON, KHWB: Steve Simon with KHWB TV in Houston. The sensors worked today. What's your reaction to that? And do you feel like you can finally put this to bed as an unexplained anomaly, as you call it?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Is that for me?

SIMON: That's for you. That's fine.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I'm a little disappointed. I'll be very honest with you.

Having worked through the rationale and satisfied ourselves right up -- right up to including me, that we were good to go with three of four, I said the other day, and I meant it, I wanted the one that failed the other day to fail again because we had some diagnostic procedures in place today. And maybe, maybe we could have removed the U from the UA and turned it into an EA. And that would have been nice to do.

So now we're in the position that I think Mike Leinbach said earlier, we have an unexplained resolution.

(LAUGHTER)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: And I guess that's good. But engineers don't like the unexplained. And now the evidence is -- or at least half the evidence is gone, never to be seen again.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All right. Let's stay back along the wall -- Tracy.

TRACY WATSON, "USA TODAY": Tracy Watson, "USA Today."

I guess for Mr. Hale. Were you relieved to see by the end of the countdown that the sensors were all working right?

HALE: It's always good to have a clean vehicle where everything's working right, so yes, I was very pleased.

WATSON: Were you surprised?

HALE: I -- no. I kind of thought that might happen. So...

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: I'll tell you, we had a very detailed trouble-shooting plan that we ran through today. And try as we might, we were not able to make an ecosensor fail today. So it was -- it was a good feeling.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Worked hard at it, huh?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That's right.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Second row, blue shirt -- Tom.

TOM COSTELLO, NBC NEWS: Thank you very much. Tom Costello from NBC News. Was there anything at all today that didn't go as picture perfect as it appeared to have gone to all of us watching?

VERJEE: Today, Mother Nature smiled on us and the Columbia crew smiled on us. NASA's holding a press conference at this moment, where they acknowledge the power and the majesty of the launch because of the sheer gall, they said, of this team that pulled the program from the depths of despair and made it fly. It is, they said, a great day.

Miles O'Brien was there to witness this day. He joins us now.

Miles, it took two-and-a-half years to get to this day. What does it mean for those at NASA? What does it mean for the astronauts?

MILES O'BRIEN, CNN SPACE CORRESPONDENT: Well, it means a lot because of the full context in which it is set, Zain. If you think about it for a moment, what you have to remember is, there is a date certain at which the shuttles will not fly any longer. That's in 2010. That isn't a lot of time.

If they can fly 12-15 missions, that would be actually pretty aggressive. So this is the beginning of the end of the shuttle program. And all the majesty they talk of and the giddiness they have is met with an undercurrent of anxiety about what happens next.

On the one hand, everybody's excited about the prospects here about possibly returning to the moon or a mission to Mars maybe some day. But this is, after all, why people come to work here, to work on the space shuttle. And that's the way it's been for almost 25 years now.

And so while they're excited and "giddy" is the term I heard to see it fly once again, they know it's the beginning of an end of an era, Zain. And while that new era may be exciting, it is the unknown. You know, people -- people here are used to dealing with the unknown, but this is a different kind of unknown.

VERJEE: At the press conference, it was the debris, whether there was any debris that had come off. That was raised. And the response was, look, we didn't see anything, but we have to go frame by frame and interpret the photographic images. Tell us a little bit about that process, how long it takes, and clearly how it important it is.

O'BRIEN: Well, I can tell you, we here at CNN are doing the same thing. We're going through it frame by frame as well.

They have -- NASA has in excess of 100 cameras. Some of them based in the ground, some of them in the air, some of them, as you saw, on the external fuel tank, some of them in the shuttle. On and on it goes. Some of them high definition television, 70 millimeter film, on and on. The resolution is tremendous, and the money spent on this is in several million-dollar range. And so what it will provide is a tremendous amount of data and multiple angles of the vehicle as it rose towards space, so that if, in fact, that debris event, whatever you want to call it, that occurred right around as those solid rocket boosters came off, if that is of any consequence, they will know about it.

Now, maybe it didn't hit the orbiter. Maybe it didn't cause any damage. Maybe it fell harmlessly. That wouldn't necessarily cause a big problem, as you might understand.

I mean, they knew the debris was going to come off. The question is, was it debris that would cause harm to the orbiter?

So there's a whole series of viewings that are going on under way right now, even beginning as we speak. They're looking at the first initial videotape, and that process will continue. And as it does, we'll get a very clear picture of the health of the space shuttle, really unprecedented. This has never happened in the previous 113 missions -- Zain.

VERJEE: Miles O'Brien, thanks a lot.

JIM CLANCY, CNN INTERNATIONAL ANCHOR: All right. We're going to continue to cover what's going on out in space with the space shuttle. But for right now, we want to look at some of our major stories now.

Both Britain and Egypt reeling, of course, under the recent terror attacks that targeted their nations, their peoples. We're going to focus on several developments.

VERJEE: The British prime minister, Tony Blair, says the world must confront extremist ideology to defeat terrorism. In a lengthy press briefing earlier, a defiant and resolute prime minister said there is no justification for suicide bombings anywhere in the world as British police focus on new leads in London.

CLANCY: Now, the investigation also continuing in Egypt. Security officials there say they have identified at least one of the men responsible for the Sharm el-Sheikh bombings. We're going to have a live report from the region.

All right. Let's look closer at the situation in London. That's where European political editor Robin Oakley has more on Mr. Blair's comments this day.

And Robin, certainly nobody is disagreeing with the prime minister when he says you have to stand up to terrorism. At the same time, many people are questioning the wisdom of the war in Iraq.

ROBIN OAKLEY, CNN EUROPEAN POLITICAL EDITOR: Well, certainly, Jim. And that was one of the questions that Tony Blair has had to face up to today.

As the search goes on for the four men whose faces, at least, have been identified in the latest wave of attempted suicide bombings in London, so the political moves are going on, too, to try and prevent more occurrences of this kind in the future. Tony Blair today met the leaders of other parties to help move forward on anti- terrorist legislation, and he also had the chance at that lengthy press conference to have his say on a lot of the issues surrounding the basic questions of terrorism. (BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

OAKLEY (voice-over): At his first monthly session with reporters since London's subway was bombed, Tony Blair was angry, passionate and determined never to compromise with terrorists.

TONY BLAIR, BRITISH PRIME MINISTER: I do not believe we should give one inch to them. Not in this country and the way we live our lives here, not in Iraq, not in Afghanistan, not in our support for two states, Israel and Palestinian, not in our support for the alliances we choose, including with America.

OAKLEY: Unlike the Irish Republican Army, said Mr. Blair, today's terrorists had aims nobody could ever negotiate on. And he revealed the moment in 2001 when the world had changed for him.

BLAIR: September the 11th for me was a wake-up call. Do you know what I think the problem is? That a lot of the world woke up for a short time and then turned over and went back to sleep again.

And we are not going to deal with this problem with the roots as deep as they are until we confront these people at every single level. And not just their methods, but their ideas.

OAKLEY: Questioned persistently on whether he's increased the danger for Britain by going to war in Iraq, Mr. Blair conceded the terrorists might use it as a propaganda issue. But he scorned the motives of the suicide bombers.

BLAIR: If it's concern for Iraq, why are they driving a car bomb into the middle of a group of children and killing them?

OAKLEY: There was never, he said, any justification for a suicide bombing in Britain or anywhere else.

Earlier, Mr. Blair met leaders of the main opposition parties to agree a way forward on new anti-terrorist laws. He defended plans to allow the deportation of radical preachers who glorified terrorism.

BLAIR: I think it's perfectly reasonable to say that if somebody is inciting terrorism here in this country, I'm sorry, you can go and do that elsewhere, thank you. You're not doing it here.

OAKLEY: The other party leaders signaled their approval of a wide package, but they have reservations about a request from the police to be allowed to hold terrorist suspects up to three months without charge.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We see very considerable difficulties in that. That's a long time to hold someone without charge and possibly just release them after that.

OAKLEY: But both he and the liberal democrats leader promised to do everything they could to maintain consensus.

(END VIDEOTAPE) OAKLEY: Politicians in all parties are determined not to rush any new legislation and to maintain Britain's traditional balance between civil liberties and protecting the citizen. And above all else, they're determined in their response to the bombers not to do anything which would give the terrorists a victory by dividing society -- Jim.

CLANCY: How much pressure are the police coming under now? There are four suspected bombers, people who tried to detonate bombs on London's mass transit system, that seem to be at large. How much pressure on them to apprehend them?

OAKLEY: Huge pressure, Jim, because London, while being stoic in the face of the first round of bombs and the second attempt, a lot of people are very nervous on public transport at the moment. There is huge pressure on the police, and, of course, pressure in two ways, because of the sad killing of the young Brazilian electrician who was taken for a terrorist bomber and who was perfectly innocent and who was killed by the police. But as Tony Blair has said, the police would have been equally criticized if they had failed in those circumstances to apprehend or to stop a terrorist bomber -- Jim.

CLANCY: All right. Robin Oakley, our senior political editor there in Europe. Thank you, as always, Robin.

VERJEE: As Robin was saying, British authorities hunting for the suspects behind last Thursday's botched bomb attacks, they've seized a car believed to have been used by one of the men. They're also examining suspicious material found at a north London flat.

The apartment's registered to 24-year-old Yasin Hassan Omar, who came to Britain from Somalia. Police identified a second suspect, Muktar Said Ibrahim, who visited that apartment recently. Ibrahim came to Britain from Eritrea.

Police are still looking for all four suspects in last Thursday's attempt. Police have found a fifth bomb, but it's not really clear if they're searching for a fifth bomber.

CLANCY: Well, meantime, Egyptian security officials say they have identified at least one of the men responsible for the Sharm el- Sheikh bombings. Those sources say he is an Egyptian, he has ties to Islamist groups, and he carried out the attack on Ghazala Gardens Hotel. Police are questioning the man's family, trying to determine who he might have associated with.

In another development, authorities are ruling out some people as suspects.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

HUSSEIN HARIDY, EGYPTIAN AMBASSADOR TO PAKISTAN (through translator): I got in touch with the Pakistani government late last night, and I informed them officially that Cairo, the Egyptian government, denies the involvement of any Pakistani citizen in the Sharm el-Sheikh explosions. (END VIDEO CLIP)

CLANCY: Well, Egyptian police have been circulating the pictures of five missing Pakistanis. They say, however, that they've been tracking those men since before Saturday's bombings.

We're going to take a short break. Coming up next on CNN, it is a heat wave.

VERJEE: Americans try to beat the heat. More on that and other stories making news in the United States after this.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

CLANCY: Welcome back to YOUR WORLD TODAY. We're going to check in on some of the stories making news in the U.S., where there has been a blistering heat wave across the Midwest.

A large swathe of the U.S. now suffering from temperatures more than 100 degrees Fahrenheit or 60 degrees Celsius. People are cranking up air-conditioners, heading out to swimming pools. Emergency workers trying to keep a close eye on the elderly and others who might suffer health problems.

Four Boy Scout leaders died in an electrical accident on the first day of the organization's national jamboree gathering near Bowling Green, Virginia. Another Boy Scout leader and a contract worker were injured. They're listed in stable condition.

They were apparently electrocuted, those who were killed, when a tent pole they were installing struck an overhead power line. The accident is under investigation.

The mother of Natalee Holloway now offering a $1 million reward for the safe return of her 18-year-old daughter. The American teenager disappeared from Aruba nearly two months ago. Meantime, the FBI says Aruban authorities have turned over a variety of documents, including transcripts of their interrogation of the 17-year-old son of an Aruban judge, the only suspect who remains jailed in the case.

VERJEE: Still ahead on CNN International, labor unrest in India.

CLANCY: Police in the capital cracking down on hundreds of striking workers. Events then spiral out of control and images are captured on videotape.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

VERJEE: In India, fresh demonstrations erupted in New Delhi a day after dramatic TV images showed hundreds of policemen beating up protesting workers. On Monday, about 100 workers were injured after a march turned violent. The workers were demanding the reinstatement of some sacked colleagues.

The clashes began after workers beat up a lone policeman after police reinforcements arrived. It was the workers who were on the receiving end. A full inquiry has now been ordered into Monday's violence.

CLANCY: Well, let's check and see how the markets in the U.S. are doing. And for that, it's over to Valerie Morris in New York City.

(STOCK MARKET REPORT)

CLANCY: We're going to have a roundup of the main stories coming up in a moment.

VERJEE: And also ahead, talks to make North Korea nuclear-free resume in a more positive atmosphere. But what are the chances real progress can be made? We'll bring you in-depth analysis next.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

VERJEE: Welcome back to YOUR WORLD TODAY on CNN International. I'm Zain Verjee.

CLANCY: I'm Jim Clancy, and these are the stories that are making headlines around the world.

The U.S. Space Shuttle Discovery launching Tuesday from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. This the first shuttle mission since the tragedy of February 1st, 2003, when the shuttle Columbia broke up during re-entry, killing all on board. The Discovery flight crew, which includes a Japanese member, is on a 12-day long mission.

VERJEE: British Prime Minister Tony Blair says there can be no justification for suicide bombings anywhere in the world. At a press briefing, the British prime minister said the roots of terror lie far deeper than Britain's presence in Iraq or Afghanistan.

CLANCY: Egyptian security officials believe that they have identified the body of one of the suspected Sharm El-Sheikh bombers. The sources say he is an Egyptian with ties to Islamist groups. Police are now questioning the man's family. They're trying to determine who he is associated with. There's also now word that authorities received warning of an attack days ahead of the bombings.

For more on that and the ongoing investigation, let's cross over to Chris Burns. He is live with us from Sharm El-Sheikh -- Chris.

CHRIS BURNS, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Well, Jim, the Egyptian government's has been doing a bit of damage control, diplomatic damage control, because there have been reports coming out of here quoting security forces that the Pakistanis, some Pakistanis, were involved. The Egyptian government, after an angry rebuke by Pervez Musharraf, the Pakistani president, sent their ambassador and his lamabi (ph) to tell them no, there was no Pakistani link to the Sharm El-Sheikh attacks last weekend that killed at least 84 people, including many foreigners. They -- one of the official newspapers also came out and said no, no, no, there's no link, but it didn't explain why there was no link.

And an independent -- the leading independent newspaper here in this country is sticking by these reports that there are five Pakistanis -- here are the pictures of them, with the names, they said -- that had checked into a hotel here in Sharm El-Sheikh on July 7th and then disappeared. They came in on fake Jordanian passports. Very suspicious to a number of officials they have talked to -- Jim.

CLANCY: All right, as you continue to monitor the situation there, there is some reports that there are many British nationals who are still missing.

BURNS: Yes, Jim, there are still a number of people missing. There was an American woman who died and her British boyfriend is among the missing. There are a number of foreigners who are missing. Officials are saying it's very, very difficult to confirm the identifications of quite a few people because a lot of the remains were burned beyond recognition. They're using DNA. In fact, they reportedly used some sophisticated kind of identification to identify the bomber Youssef Badran in the hotel attacks. So it is a very slow, painstaking process to identify those in those blasts -- Jim.

CLANCY: All right. Chris Burns, reporting to us there live from Sharm El-Sheikh.

BURNS: Well, that is all an important note there because Tony Blair this day was very much on the defensive, very strongly coming out saying that involvement in Iraq had nothing to do with what happened in Egypt. It had nothing to do with the London bombings. Meantime, the Arab League, Egypt and other Arab states trying to arrange a summit to discuss the Iraq and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

We want to talk a little bit more about, as well as other issues. Amre Moussa, secretary-general of the Arab League, joins us now. He's at the United Nations. There's an effort there underway. They're trying to define the term terrorism. Now Kofi Annan's secretary- general has this as very important, Amre Moussa. Why?

AMRE MOUSSA, ARAB LEAGUE SECRETARY-GENERAL: Well, Jim, first of all, the terrorism and the campaign against international terrorism is a campaign that all of us should join. The definition is -- enjoys certain consensus that terrorism is a plague that is directed against innocent civilians, terrorizing societies. And this we all agree. Innocent civilians should not be subject of acts of terrorism, paying with their lives for things that they have nothing to do with in.

CLANCY: Mr. Secretary-General, you say we all agree, and I think most people, if you asked them would say I know terrorism when I see it. But there at the U.N., people don't all agree. There's a lot of resistance. People who want to have their national cause, their fight called terrorism.

MOUSSA: Well, the debate is on. And because of the involvement of certain governments, the existence of foreign military occupation, the provocation to the people under occupation. So there is confusion. But there is a bit of confusion in the situation, but in the first place, innocent civilians should be spared the rigors of any armed conflict or any terrorist act. I would refer here to the Geneva Conventions, for example, that one of them is to protect civilians in time of war or in time of conflict. Therefore, civilians under all circumstances should be spared the rigors of any military confrontation by state or by individuals or organizations. That is for innocent civilians. As for the situation in occupied territory, it is all resistance to the military occupation. This is a different story. This is...

CLANCY: That's not terrorism?

MOUSSA: (INAUDIBLE) right.

CLANCY: That's not terrorism?

MOUSSA: Excuse me. Say that again.

CLANCY: Well, let's lay it out. I mean, when Palestinians use suicide bombs against Israeli civilians, are you saying that's not terrorism?

MOUSSA: I have said several times and I say it again today. We should be and we are against addressing civilian population, be them Palestinians or Israelis or of any nationality. This does not derogate from the fact that under -- people under occupation have to resist and they have the right to resist the military presence, the military presence. But innocent civilians on all sides and in the case, as you mentioned, of the Israelis or Palestinians, this is the same. Palestinians, Palestinian innocent civilians, also Israeli innocent civilians, have nothing to do with -- should be spared the attacks against them.

CLANCY: All right. Let me shift the focus a little bit to a concern. I want to look at al Qaeda. Some people say that we're concerned about the wrong thing here. They believe the attacks in London, indeed the attacks in Sharm El-Sheikh, may represent what they say is a second generation of supporters of Osama bin Laden and al Qaeda. Do you agree with that? And why are young people doing this? People want an answer to that question, Amre Moussa.

MOUSSA: Well, I don't know whether they are second generation, third generation, third generation. This is not the issue. The issue is there is a state of frustration, of anger, of agitation in the Middle East, in the Muslim world for so many reasons. We cannot exclude the political causes, the political situations like Palestine or Iraq or any other cause of that kind, and in the contribution to this dangerous state of frustration and agitation.

That's why the root causes of terrorism should be addressed. And there is nothing wrong in that. There are no accusations or sensitivities that should derail our attitude or our work in combating terrorism. Terrorism will not be defeated by security acts or actions alone. In order to defeat terrorism, we will have to address the whole issue, address it in honesty and with integrity.

CLANCY: What will the Arab League do to do that? Because some people say it is the Arab governments that have to lead that charge. They have to be accountable, they have to make sure that the message their young people are getting is the right message, an honest message.

MOUSSA: Well, all governments should act together in order to defeat terrorism. But also, I would underline that the causes of terrorism are so serious, that have to be addressed in a fair way. Otherwise, the agitation and anger and frustration will continue to prevail breeding such, as you say, second generation or third generation. Everybody's angry, all (INAUDIBLE) because of the general situation in the region. But this -- having said that, nothing would justify killing an innocent civilian.

CLANCY: Amre Moussa, secretary-general of the Arab League. Sir, I want to thank you for being with us...

MOUSSA: Thank you, Jim.

CLANCY: ... here on YOUR WORLD TODAY.

VERJEE: Back at the bargaining table, North Korea re-enters six- party talks, but what does it all mean? We're going to ask an expert on the region.

CLANCY: Plus, Iraqis are taking to the streets. We're going to tell you just what they're chanting about.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

CLANCY: Welcome back. You're watching YOUR WORLD TODAY, an hour of world news on CNN International.

Hundreds of Iraqis took to the streets in the city of Samawa. They were protesting the way they live. What brought all these Iraqis into the streets? What do they have to complain about? Well, they say they don't have adequate supplies of drinking water. They say electrical service is virtually nonexistent, and that means no air conditioning in these, the hottest summer months.

The protesters chanted slogans against Japanese troops that are based in the area. They also burned a Japanese flag with somewhat limited success. Japan's 600 non-combat troops are involved in reconstruction projects in that immediate area. Tokyo currently considering building a power plant in Samawa. That would be a $100 million job.

VERJEE: The U.S. and North Korea struck a conciliatory tone in opening statements, as nuclear talks resumed in Beijing. Pyongyang says it wants to make progress on eliminating atomic weapons from the Korean peninsula. In turn, the U.S. says it has no plans of invading North Korea and vowed to stay in Beijing as long as progress is being made. The U.S. has held several rare one-on-one meetings with North Korean officials in Beijing. So does this signal a change in the diplomatic approach by the U.S.?

Joining us now from Washington is Wendy Sherman, the former U.S. special adviser on North Korea during the Clinton administration. Thanks so much for joining us, Wendy. So...

WENDY SHERMAN, FMR. U.S. ADVISER ON NORTH KOREA: Good to be with you.

VERJEE: Is it a change of approach by the U.S., a softer line toward North Korea, do you think?

SHERMAN: We certainly are seeing a much better beginning to this round of talks, which I certainly hope turns into actual negotiations, not just talks about talks. Ambassador Chris Hill had a one-on-one meeting with Kim Kye Gwan of North Korea before the formal talks began. He wouldn't call this a negotiation, but it's certainly a departure from what the Bush administration has been willing to do in the past. He talked about words for words and actions for actions, which may indicate step-by-step approach rather than an all or nothing approach. And these are good beginning signs for a better and a possible negotiation with North Korea.

VERJEE: How high are the stakes?

SHERMAN: The stakes are incredibly high. We believe that North Korea, during the years of the Bush administration, have now quadrupled their nuclear weapons capability. They have restarted their reactor plant to make more plutonium for nuclear weapons. Their highly enriched uranium program goes on. And in this era where we are all worried about terrorists getting hold of nuclear materials or nuclear weapons, North Korea, which has sold just about everything it has under its own roof, makes us very, very nervous.

VERJEE: Even though both sides are engaging, Wendy, we're hearing words for words, is there trust or is this just a test to see if it's there?

SHERMAN: I think there's probably very little trust on either side of the equation. The United States is going to test North Korea's intentions to see whether they really will give up their nuclear weapons program as Chairman Kim Jong-Il has indicated that he will, as Kim Kye Gwan, their negotiator, talked about a nuclear-free peninsula. And North Korea will also test U.S. intentions. Is President George Bush really serious about negotiating or are there people in the administration who are just looking for failure to take more coercive action?

VERJEE: And on the point of failure, the six-party talks haven't really gone anywhere before. They've always ended up in stalemate. If it happens again this time, what's plan B?

SHERMAN: I think Plan B is quite difficult, has gotten more difficult over the last four years. It means additional political pressure, perhaps going to the United Nations. It means economic pressure, further boycotts and embargo of everything that North Korea does. More interdiction, stopping its counterfeiting, stopping its drug trafficking. And it may also mean military actions, including strikes, all of which would be catastrophic for the Korean peninsula and for our relationships with China, with Russia, with Japan and South Korea. VERJEE: You've met Kim Jong-Il before, Wendy. And I'm just wondering, what kind of a man is he? Is he someone who you think is absolutely determined to get and develop nuclear weapons? Or someone who can be persuaded, who can change his mind?

SHERMAN: I think he is a man who can change his mind, but I don't know whether he will in this instance. And it's very important that we find out through these negotiations whether he will give up his nuclear weapons. He is a man who really sees himself as a great leader, as providing his people with what they need. But they are very isolated, very cut off from the world. The economy is in very bad shape, their people are very malnourished. So he has a lot at stake.

At the same time, he has seen that the only countries that have been invaded by the United States, the last remaining superpower, have been countries that did not have a nuclear deterrence. And so he has taken a lesson out of Iraq, out of Serbia, that one can only deter the United States by having a nuclear arsenal. And that's a very dangerous lesson that he believes he has learned.

VERJEE: In Washington, Wendy Sherman, the former U.S. special adviser on North Korea during the Clinton administration. Thanks so much for your perspective, Wendy.

SHERMAN: Thank you.

(INTERNATIONAL WEATHER REPORT)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

CLANCY: Welcome back to YOUR WORLD TODAY. You know Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Terminator? Well, there's now a "Toeminator." The world of toe wrestling apparently has a new champion. He is down in Texas, I think. Controversial victory, though. 12th international competition. You know, it wasn't there at all. It was in Ashburn, England.

VERJEE: Yes, it was. Let's take a look.

OK. The final saw Paul "Toeminator" Beech going toe-to-toe with Allen "Nasty" Nash (ph), who you could call his arch rival. The athletes squared off on the todium, the objective really being to force their opponent's foot onto the side rails.

CLANCY: The loser disputed the outcome, but "Toeminator" said he won that contest fair and square.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

PAUL "TOEMINATOR" BEECH: (INAUDIBLE) of his toe. He was trying to flick out. I started the grip. I won. The referee's decision is final. That's the way it goes.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just what does it make -- take to make a toe wrestling champion like yourself? BEECH: A lot of beer.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Could you give us a bit of an indication of the training, though? We saw you warming up before.

BEECH: I've done a bit of training. Going around, press-ups on me toes. But that's it. Secret. Everything else is a secret.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

VERJEE: A lot of beer and press-ups on me toes.

CLANCY: It was a day of triumph for the entire Beech family. As a matter of fact, the "Toeminator"'s wife, Mrs. Toeminator, won the women's world title, as well.

VERJEE: Well, this has been your world today on CNN International. I'm Zain Verjee.

CLANCY: I'm Jim Clancy. Thanks for joining us. We live with you with more pictures of the space shuttle.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

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