Return to Transcripts main page

CNN SATURDAY MORNING NEWS

Utah Mine Owner Briefs Reporters on Rescue Efforts; Possible Terror Threat in the Big Apple; Election Day in Sierra Leone

Aired August 11, 2007 - 07:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


JOHN ZARRELLA, CNN CORRESPONDENT: one way or the other, whether they are alive or dead -- T.J.
T.J. HOLMES, CNN ANCHOR: All right, John Zarrella. Thank you so much. And folks tuning in here with us, we have breaking news on the Utah mine rescue effort.

BRIANNA KEILAR, CNN ANCHOR: That's right, at this point, mining officials in Huntington, Utah where six miners have been trapped since Monday say a second drill has broken through into the area where those miners are thought to be trapped. That word came from mine operator Bob Murray just moments ago.

And let's go back to John Zarrella. He is there. He's been following this. John, just bring us up to date again.

ZARRELLA: Brianna, what we had been told of course all along was to set this up for our viewers just joining us is that yesterday of course they had penetrated into what they thought was the cavity with a 1 1/2-inch, 2-inch hole where they dropped a microphone in and also some devices to check for oxygen levels and it turned out that that had actually shifted out of the cavity and penetrated another area so they weren't in the cavity.

Well, just about an hour ago, now less than an hour ago, Bob Murray, the mine operator, came out and in an impromptu news conference here told us that they had indeed been in the mine. He had just come out of the mine -- told us that in fact they had just penetrated with the 8 5/8-inch drill into the mine and Murray talked about both the penetration of -- into that cavity and he also talked about the work going on in the main tunnel to remove the debris so that rescue teams can physically get to the miners.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

BOB MURRAY, PRES. & CEO, MURRAY ENERGY: The activity is at a very fast pace. The progress is way too slow for me and I think for anyone. But it's not because of effort. We have advanced 650 feet from where the damage from the earthquake started in the direction of the men and we encountered our first piece of machinery that they would use near the face of the mine, which was a cable sled. And they haven't even pulled it out yet and encountered it just before I came out.

QUESTION: Did you see that with your own eyes?

MURRAY: Yes.

QUESTION: What were your thoughts at that time?

MURRAY: I thought it was a pickup truck at first and we all did. And it's -- they were going to (INAUDIBLE) up to it and I said no, let's have water jacks props and get up there quickly and see what it is and that's what they did to bring a rope out to pull it up with a continuous miner. And but we couldn't. There was no point pulling it out. It turned out to be a cable sled, but we had the rope and everything ready to pull the pickup truck out if it was.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: The cable sled's just a thing that cable lays in. What was your question?

QUESTION: I was going to ask you if you had made any other comments about the progress of the 8 5/8-inch drill?

MURRAY: I'll talk about it at the press conference.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: We've intercepted the coal seam.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: No it's just intercepted it. We have no time to do anything or give any report but we have intercepted the coal seam where we said we would. That's all I can report right now.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: That's where the video will be put in but we must pull the drill steel to do that.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: No, those are just still pictures of the miners underground.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: As soon as they pull the drill steel. Two hours probably.

QUESTION: You were saying that (INAUDIBLE) the workers, they're doing the best they can, but it is slow.

MURRAY: Yes, it is because of the amount of support they have to put in as they advance. There's just no other way to do it. Every 2 1/2 feet we set a very large water jack. You saw those props. We have to roof bolt and we have to put the wire mesh in against the ribs as we advance in to protect the rescue crews.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE) MURRAY: I'm tired.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: It's always been a rescue mission. I don't see any -- when you say "recovery," I really don't know what you mean. It is a rescue mission. We're going in and get these men out.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: About the same as in the other entries, about six feet.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: The entry is about eight feet high and it's open on the first one to two feet, which is what I've said to you. And I showed you pictures of that. I brought you out pictures and your people went in and saw that. So it's open the first one or two feet but we can't get men over it. And then the rubble's about six feet deep and it's not changed.

QUESTION: How many oxygen tanks are down there? If they were to move for example to a different shafts if at all possible ...

MURRAY: No, that wouldn't apply.

QUESTION: Not possible?

MURRAY: No, it is not a question that applies when you talk about oxygen tanks. You don't carry oxygen tanks.

QUESTION: I thought you mentioned early on that you had emergency situation ...

MURRAY: We have SCSRs, self-rescuing devices that are in a cache and that's not an oxygen tank.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE) degree of the rubble has been consistent all the way through then?

MURRAY: It has. They have hit some areas where it wasn't quite as heavy, but it's been consistent all the way in except for a few places.

QUESTION: Can you test the air quality ...

MURRAY: That wouldn't apply here. We have perfect air. We have 69,000 cubic feet of air where the recovery is going on, 69,000 cubic feet per minute. You get very cold and it's very windy, that's how much air we have.

QUESTION: How many men are down there right now?

MURRAY: 42.

(END VIDEOTAPE) ZARRELLA: So at this point, they have two things going on. Of course, they're working to open up the main mine shaft and they've gotten to 650 feet, as you heard Bob Murray say and that the other -- on the other side of the equation they've actually finally managed to break through with that 8 5/8-inch drill into what they believe is the cavity where the six miners are trapped, but they have not gotten a camera down there.

It's going to be at least another couple of hours before that takes place and they have not gotten any samplings of the air yet to determine whether the oxygen level in there is good enough to sustain life. Brianna?

KEILAR: John Zarrella live for us from Huntington, Utah where he's been monitoring this story around the clock.

And we also want to tell you that coming up in the 10:00 a.m. Eastern hour, we're going to have a one-on-one interview with Bob Murray, the owner of the Crandall Canyon mine.

HOLMES: We are learning more about the six trapped miners. Mining company not releasing the names officially but family and friends have confirmed their identities to CNN. The men are Carlos Payan said to be in his 20s, Don Erickson, a 50-year old father of two and stepfather of three, 57-year-old Kerry Allred, also a father of three, 41-year-old Manuel Sanchez, Brandon Phillips is 24 and 23-year- old Lewis Alonso Hernandez. He has a one-year-old daughter.

Tonight at 8:00 Eastern, we will take a look back at the Sago mine tragedy, what really happened and could it have been prevented. Inside the Sago mine tragedy, tonight and tomorrow night, 8:00 Eastern.

KEILAR: New this morning, a possible terror threat against three major American cities, this time involving radioactive materials. CNN's Allan Chernoff is live in New York City with the latest. Allan, what can you tell us?

ALLAN CHERNOFF, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Good morning, Brianna.

Well, police here in New York City are responding to an unverified report of a threat of a radiological attack against New York City and specifically against the city's financial nerve center. We are at the corner of Broadway and Canal Street about 10 blocks north of the whole Wall Street district and let's check out what's going on here.

The police have set up barricades over here to slow down the traffic. You see as the vehicles are going through, they're checking them out and in particular the man with the blue jacket is holding a radiological detection device. He's able to actually pick up any radiation that may be coming out of any of these vehicles.

Now, the cars generally are just passing right through. Vans and larger trucks are being pulled aside a little further down and they're actually being searched as well. There are about two dozen police officers here. This all has been in operation since before dawn. Why exactly is the NYPD doing this?

Well, a private Israeli Web site called debcadat.com (ph) which is a counter terrorism site had a report of chatter on al Qaeda sites actually on Thursday saying this happened on Thursday on the al Qaeda site, chatter of the possibility of an attack against quote America's largest city and the financial nerve center. The report actually saying that the threat was a truck loaded with radiological material would come into New York City and attack over here.

Now, there has been absolutely no verification of that by the New York City police department, the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security. Nonetheless, New York is taking these precautionary -- emphasizing that -- precautionary measures against the possibility of such an attack. Let's also just keep in mind, this is all just to be precautionary just to protect the city.

Brianna, back to you.

KEILAR: All right, Allan, Allan Chernoff, thank you for that report.

CNN of course is committed to providing the most reliable coverage of news that affects your security, so stay tuned to CNN for the latest information day and night.

HOLMES: We turn now to Newark, New Jersey, where a third suspect has been arrested in connection with the execution-style killings of three college students. The suspect is identified as a 15-year-old male. Yesterday another suspect, Jose Carranza (ph), pleaded not guilty to the killing and another 15-year-old boy pleaded not guilty on Thursday.

Hundreds of people are expected at funerals in Newark today for the shooting victims. Authorities say the investigation indicates the shootings were not a hate crime. They say robbery appears to be the motive.

KEILAR: More on the rescue efforts at that coal mine in Utah is coming up later.

And also, one man's remarkable journey to find his sister.

HOLMES: He's the big brother who spent nearly every minute with his little sister -- until the day she vanished.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Where's Molly? Where's Molly? Where's Molly?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: And he got this answer.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Stop talking about Molly. Go to your room.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

HOLMES: Elizabeth Cohen with a mystery that gives hope to thousands of other families.

REYNOLDS WOLF, CNN METEOROLOGIST: And another sweltering day across much of the nation, including a high of 102 in Memphis, 99 in Dallas and 99 in Atlanta. How long is this going to last? I'll let you know coming up in just a few moments.

KEILAR: Later this hour, we're also going to take you to Sierra Leone where voting is going on right now. It is a test of the nation's recovery from a devastating civil war. And our Betty Nguyen is there and joins us live this Saturday morning.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KEILAR: It's a busy day ahead for the shuttle "Endeavour" astronauts, the first of three scheduled space walks begins just after 12:30 Eastern. Mission specialists Rick Mastrockio (ph) and Dave Williams are getting ready and they actually spent the night in a special chamber to prevent decompression sickness. We've got some live shots of the crew here. They're going to be out there, these two men, for six hours today installing an addition to the international space station.

But meanwhile, something a little more serious. NASA is checking a possible gouge on "Endeavour's" belly, the shuttle possibly hit by a chunk of ice during liftoff. That piece of ice coming off the external fuel tank. It is really just amazing how they can get such detailed pictures of this, but of course NASA keeps a very close eye bringing these amazing pictures to us.

HOLMES: All right. We will turn now to Reynolds Wolf. Good morning, kind sir. Your word this morning is that when we walk outside after work we'll vaporize?

WOLF: We're going to vaporize, like a scene from "Star Trek," when they beam up and you see them. It is going to be one of those kind of deals.

KEILAR: I'm melting!

WOLF: It is. It is going to be that way, especially one place would be in west Memphis, which happens to be T.J.'s hometown. High temperatures expected to go up to 102 and that's not even the heat index. That's just the plain old temperature. It is going to be roasting out there so you might want to call and check ...

HOLMES: Call and say bye because they're going to vaporize.

WOLF: Very much so, Atlanta's also going to be roasting. Take a look and we'll show you how it looks right now, right now not too bad. This is a shot that we have from WSB. We've got hazy conditions out there. That's kind of frustrating because you see the cloud cover and you think we're going to get some rain. Right? Well, not necessarily. It is kind of a frustrating thing that happens.

You see the clouds, but you have that high pressure overhead, it is that upper level ridge of high pressure that keeps things nice and steamy and take a look at the high we're expecting in Atlanta today, as we go to the big old weather map, 99 degrees is how warm it is going to get. But then when you pile on the humidity, it is going to feel like it's anywhere from 115 to as high as 120 degrees.

Now take a look at Memphis, again we're looking at 102, right in the Mississippi valley up on Mud Island. It is usually humid there, that's part of the climate but the heat is just going to be just relentless. Take a look at what we can expect in places like Dallas, Texas, where today believe it or not the coolest day over the next five days, going to 99, but then 102. It is going to be like a broken record from Sunday all the way through Wednesday. Atlanta also some extreme heat, not quite as warm but still into the 90s.

However, as we get into early next week and into Tuesday and Wednesday, look at the highs mainly into the low 90s with maybe a stray shower, but right now we're calling for partly cloudy skies. We'll talk more about the heat wave coming up in just a few minutes right here. Let's send it back to you.

HOLMES: All right. Thank you, kind sir.

WOLF: I'm here for the bad news, guys. I'm all about the heat.

HOLMES: You're always so pleasant about delivering the bad news.

KEILAR: You almost don't realize you're delivering four days of 102-degree temperatures.

WOLF: It's work, guys.

HOLMES: Appreciate it. See you shortly.

We do want to remind you that we are keeping an eye on the situation, the breaking situation out in Utah at that mine where the six miners are trapped. We understand a second drill has broken through to the area where the six miners are believed to be trapped.

But we don't know just yet about the fate of those miners. A camera's going to be going down into that hole should take a couple of hours. We might be able to take a good look and we might get some real answers coming up here shortly. Our John Zarrella is live on the scene for us. We'll be checking back in with him.

KEILAR: Today is a day of hope is dawning in Sierra Leone after a decade of war.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BETTY NGUYEN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: With no hands to vote, Jakar (ph) shows us how he used his toes to cast his ballot.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KEILAR: That was our Betty Nguyen bringing us a special report. She's going to be live from Africa this Saturday morning. HOLMES: Also, lessons learned. A brother who never stopped asking "where's Molly?" How the search for his sister is helping our siblings reunite. This story has a lot of people talking on the net. Stay here with us for it.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

HOLMES: A lot of people might be familiar with that expression, "vote with your feet." That means something pretty special today in Sierra Leone, a nation where thousands of people had their hands chopped off during years of civil war. Our Betty Nguyen is there to witness the historic moment.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

BETTY NGUYEN, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): Sierra Leone is a picturesque place where West Africa meets the Atlantic Ocean. It's home to more than five million people, many of whom are still trying to dig themselves out of poverty.

Here in the nation's capital, children spend their days searching through piles of trash just as the pigs do. Those lucky enough to find scrap metal will only earn a penny per pound. Ranked the second poorest country in the world by the United Nations, the scars from a decade of civil war are still visible. Alhaji Jakar (ph) had his arms hacked off by rebels in 1999.

ALHAJI JAKAR: I said to him, to them, don't cut off my hands. Don't amputate my hands. I'm your brother. They say no, I'm not your brother.

NGUYEN: Amputees are a reminder that about a million people were murdered, maimed or raped in a political game of power and intimidation. Much of the world knows of these atrocities from the Oscar-nominated movie "Blood Diamond," but what you don't see in the movie is how the amputees refused to let the rebels rob them of their political voice once the war ended in 2002. With no hands to vote, Jakar shows us how he used his toes to cast his ballot. But with a new set of arms and a new presidential election on Saturday, he can't wait to vote the old-fashioned way.

In fact, the enthusiasm surrounding the election has spread like fever creating an excitement that borders on euphoria. Unlike the election in 2002 which came on the heels of a bloody civil war, the fear that once ruled the streets of Freetown has now been replaced by peaceful political parties, more reminiscent of a carnival. Call it what you want, it is proof that democracy is slowly taking root.

Opposition party supporters stopped traffic and brought businesses to a virtual standstill as thousands filled the streets dancing and singing. While they look to the future, Stephen Rapp is focused on the past. He is the prosecutor for the U.N. war crimes tribunal. It is his job to go after those who bear the greatest responsibility for the war and the horrors they inflicted. And former Liberian leader Charles Taylor is the top prize. He's currently on trial at The Hague. STEPHEN RAPP, SPECIAL COURT FOR SIERRE LEONE: Justice is a key part of all of this. If you don't have the rule of law, if you have a situation where people can come in and kidnap your daughter and make her a sex slave, chop off your son's arms, rape your wife, destroy everything you've built, you can't develop a future. That's what happened in this country. And until you have a rule of law which we're I think helping establish with these judgments, this country can't go forward and that's why I think this process is so important.

NGUYEN: And justice is certainly what the people of Sierra Leone deserve after suffering for so long. But for now, they'll have to find peace of mind knowing that political change is on the horizon and the choice is theirs to make.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

NGUYEN: And I'm live now ...

HOLMES: Looks like we are having issues with her signal there. We have lost our Betty Nguyen who we just had. But, yeah, Betty Nguyen reporting there from Freetown, Sierra Leone. We're actually going to work to re-establish that connection. Yes, it is election day there in Freetown as she mentioned there had in Sierra Leone, a historic day.

We're going to try to re-establish that connection. We can't get her here immediately. We will get her back a little later in the hour for those historic elections in Sierra Leone. So hopefully we'll talk to talk with her here shortly. But some amazing things going on, a big step there for a country trying to move forward with democracy.

KEILAR: Also, we're expecting some new pictures from the Associated Press any minute now. We're going to bring that to you as soon as we have it. What we're doing right now is we're following breaking news in that mine rescue effort that's going on right now near Huntington, Utah. A second drill has broken through into the area where six miners are believed to be trapped.

We learned that about 30 minutes ago from mine operator Bob Murray but no word on the miners yet. What they're doing right now is they're trying to pull that drill bit and get a camera in. So as soon as they can lower that camera into the hole, we're going to let you know what they find here over the next couple of hours. We're going to bring you the very latest so stay right here with us on CNN.

JOSH LEVS, CNN CORRESPONDENT: In fact, we're taking a look for those pictures right now. As soon as they're available we're going to come straight to you with them. We've got a lot of people ready here to bring them to you.

Also I want to let you know, I want to take a look today at the deadliest jobs in America. Mining is one of them. But there is a surprising list and it is brand new from the Federal government just hit the other day. Keep it here on CNN, the most trusted name in news. KEILAR: And later this hour, we're going to have a story for you of a brother's triumph, separated as children, he kept asking "where's Molly?" This is a search that's helping families nationwide.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GERRI WILLIS, CNN CORRESPONDENT: With lightning season upon us, avoid shocks to your wallet by protecting your home now. Many homes are already equipped with lightning rods on their roofs, but these won't protect your TV or stereo if lightning strikes the ground or a power line near your house. The power surge generated can destroy electronics within seconds.

So, be prepared. Plug all home electronics into surge protectors and unplug high-end equipment like computers and stereo systems. And if you live in an area with frequent strikes, experts suggest home surge arresters. These can cost upwards of $200 and need to be installed by a professional, but it could save you big bucks if your home is struck by lightning.

I'm Gerri Willis and that's your "Tip of the Day." For more strategies and tips to save you money and protect your house, watch open house today at 9:30 a.m. Eastern right here on CNN.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

HOLMES: The breaking news this morning is coming to us out of Utah where that rescue effort continues to find six miners who have been trapped this week, earlier this week found out these six miners were trapped and we don't know yet about the fate of those six miners. Right now a second drill has been able to break through to the area where they do believe the miners are.

However, it could be a couple of hours before a camera is able to go down into that same hole that was drilled and look into that cavity and possibly give us some real answers to the fate of those miners. These developments came to us about an hour ago and this story continues to update itself throughout this morning. You can continue to stay right here with CNN throughout the morning and as soon as we get these developments, we will continue to pass them along to you.

With a lot more detail, we have our John Zarrella, live with us from Huntington. He has been with us all morning with the latest. Any new developments to report? And there are always new developments with this story, certainly we'll get a lot more this morning, John.

ZARELLA: Yes, T.J. Nothing since Bob Murray, the mine operator, came out and told us that in fact two different things. He had just come out from the mine himself where he had been for the last several hours and while he was inside that mine, he saw a piece of equipment that had been used by this mining team at the level where they are now digging. The rescue team is digging in the main shaft from where the initial collapse took place. They are about 650 feet in, they are, and they continue to remove debris.

He also talked about the 8 5/8-inch hole which they've now penetrated into that cavity and as you said, they have not yet been able to put the camera down in there, nor have they been able to get any readings on oxygen levels down there. Let's take a listen to what Bob Murray had to say about how difficult this recovery effort is.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

BOB MURRAY, PRESIDENT & CEO MURRAY ENERGY: The activity is at a very fast pace. The progress is way too slow for me. And I think for anyone. But it's not because of effort. We have advanced 650 feet from where the damage from the earthquake started, in the direction of the men.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

ZARELLA: Now one of the things that he says, what makes it so difficult, is that about every two to two and a half feet they have to bring in materials to shore up the mine for the safety of the rescue teams and there are 42 men in there actually working around the clock digging out this debris. It's stacked up about six feet high. There is about a one to two-foot distance between the ceiling of the mine and where that debris is but not enough clearance for them to physically get rescue workers in and over to the cavity where they believe these miners are.

We hope perhaps in the next few hours we'll get some more details on what -- when they get the camera down in there and what they actually do see. Perhaps also, T.J., get an idea on whether the oxygen is -- levels are high enough down in there to sustain human life -- T.J.

HOLMES: Again, like you were referring our viewers to and helping us with, Bob Murray there was talking about two different areas, the one hole they dug where they'll stick the camera down to just take a look, then also the actual digging going on in the shaft with the 42 workers in there. How slow is that process where the 42 people are digging and working?

Like you say, it is going around the clock and they also have to keep bringing in new material to shore up the mine as they continue to dig. How slow is that and how long could that possibly take? We talking about days or even a week or so before they're able to reach the area where they believe the miners are?

ZARELLA: Yes. As of yesterday they had originally said that it would take about a week of digging. And then yesterday later in the morning they came out and said maybe we can get this accomplished in four or five days. He did not put a timetable on it today, but the bottom line is they've gone 650 feet in about four days, five days of digging. And they still have another 1,000 feet to go.

So unless they start to make some more rapid progress in there, I suspect that we're looking probably still at another four to five days before they're physically able to get rescue teams into the cavity to search for those missing miners.

HOLMES: All right, John Zarrella on the scene for us there. John, again, thank you so much for the update. We certainly will see you throughout this morning.

Folks, we want to let you know that at 10:00 Eastern we're going to be talking to the Murray Energy president, CEO Bob Murray. Seen his face a lot during this whole rescue effort. Going to be talking to him about these latest efforts, hopefully get more details from him. Also the families of the miners due at the site around 10:00 Eastern.

Please, keep it here with us, this is a developing story, we expect the camera possibly to make it down to that cavity where they believe the miners are actually within the next hour or two hours, according to Bob Murray. We expect details and more updates throughout this morning. Stay right here with us for that. We'll have the press conference with the families and also talking to Bob Murray, all of that for you this morning. So stay right here with us for that. We will have the press conference with the families and also talking to Bob Murray, all of that for you this morning. Stay with us.

KEILAR: And of course, the Utah mine collapse points to the dangers some Americans face on the job. Mining, no doubt, is dangerous work but does it rank as one of the country's most dangerous jobs? We are joined now by CNN's Josh Levs to answer that question.

LEVS: You know, obviously a lot of people are thinking about this. I started thinking about it this week.

KEILAR: I did, too.

You couldn't help but wonder. Obviously this situation is on everyone's mind. I got to thinking what are the most dangerous, deadly jobs in America then this week on Thursday the government put out a new report. Some of what's in here you might expect but some just might surprise you.

Incidents of recent days are reminders that coal mining can be life-risking work. Last year, 47 coal miners died in several incidents. 12 of them in the Sago mine disaster. The industry's death toll more than doubled from the year before. New federal statistics show coal mining has one of the highest death rates of any profession in the U.S., but not the highest.

That grisly distinction goes to fishermen. We sometimes see them being rescued after ships capsize or sink. Out of every 1,000 people in the industry, 142 died last year.

Then comes pilots. Due to a series of incidents in 2006, including the crash of a COM air jet in August.

Next on the list of highest occupational fatalities -- loggers, iron and steel workers, and coal miners. After that comes refuse collectors, farmers and ranchers, power line workers, people who work on roofs, and those who do a great deal of driving for a living.

Overall, preliminary figures show 5,703 occupational deaths last year. That's down just barely from the year before. If the preliminary figures hold, 2006 would mark the lowest rate since the tabulation started in 1992. Still, the labor department said this week there is a long way to go. Don't be surprised if this issue gains traction in the presidential race. It often does.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SEN. JOHN HENRY (D) 2004 PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: The safety of your workplace, the ability to earn overtime, your able to organize, it's all on the ballot November 2nd.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

LEVS: Some government officials really at all levels, as well as unions and workers rights groups are pushing for stricter laws and also this is important -- more enforcement of the laws that are already there. They're saying look at what happened this week. It's a reminder of how these changes need to be made immediately.

KEILAR: If you look at the list of the top ten deadliest professions, it is interesting because mining isn't necessarily on there. Right?

LEVS: Yes, I'm glad you pointed that out. It is important. Because as we were just showing coal mining, according to that list, fifth most dangerous profession. But if you look at a top ten list from the government, often mining is not on there at all. I want you to understand why.

When the government puts out that list, those figures, it groups all miners together as one profession. Well, coal mining is a lot more dangerous than other types of mining so the overall death toll is much lower. If you look just at coal mining that's why it fits in the top ten around number five.

KEILAR: Really interesting. Thanks again as always, Josh Levs, for bringing us this report. We appreciate it.

LEVS: You've got it and we'll be back real soon with pictures as soon as they're available. We'll be taking a look at those.

KEILAR: That's right. These pictures coming from the Associated Press we believe were taken by Bob Murray, the owner of Crandall Canyon mine. We're waiting for those.

Meanwhile we'll continue to bring you the latest details on this breaking news out of Utah.

Here's what we know right now. A second larger drill has broken through the cavity where six miners are believed to be trapped and right now workers are removing the drill so they can lower a camera into the hole to use that to try to locate the miners. That's expected to happen in a few hours. And then coming up in the 10:00 a.m. Eastern hour, we'll bring you and interview with mine operator Bob Murray.

Stay with CNN for continuous updates on this breaking story.

HOLMES: Another story you really got to see. Our Elizabeth Cohen is going to tell us about a half-century loss between a brother and his little sister.

KEILAR: We'll tell you about the measures he took to make sure his story won't be repeated.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KEILAR: A family mystery and a shameful era in America's treatment of the disabled. For one Oregon man the search for his long lost sister became a journey of revelations that finally ended in a reunion. CNN's Elizabeth Cohen has this incredible story.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ELIZABETH COHEN, CNN CORRESPONDENT: All of his life, Jeff Daly knew that when he was a little boy, he'd had a sister named Molly. He had hazy memories of playing with her, laughing with her, loving her.

JEFF DALY: I didn't really go out and play with other people. I spent all of my time with her.

COHEN: But then one day when Jeff was six and Molly was two, someone took Molly away.

DALY: I kept just saying, "Where's Molly? Where's Molly? Where's Molly?"

COHEN: And he got this answer.

DALY: "Stop talking about Molly! Go to your room."

COHEN: The mystery of why Molly Jo Daly disappeared would eventually send Jeff searching through his family's darkest secrets and through a shameful chapter of American history. Sue and Jack Daly were married in 1949 and set up house in the small seaside town of Astoria, Oregon. Jeff was a rising executive. Sue, a homemaker. Jeff was born in 1951.

DALY: The '50s was sort of the perfect mom. It was the "Leave it to Beaver," it was Betty Crocker, it was sort of like the perfect little home life.

COHEN: His little sister Molly was born three years later.

DALY: I'm sure she wanted to have the perfect little boy and girl family.

COHEN: But something wasn't completely perfect about Molly. Molly was disabled. So just a few months after this picture was taken, she was gone.

DALY: Yes. At this point in time, they were already making arrangements for Molly to be sent away.

COHEN: Jeff grew up and became a successful TV photographer. He traveled the world but could never completely fill that emptiness he'd felt since he was six. Over time, Jeff learned that his parents had sent Molly away because she was disabled. He told his parents he wanted to see Molly, but he says they forbid it. So Jeff waited until 2004 when both of his parents had died. He learned from a relative that Molly had spent most of her life here.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: This is the journey of a mentally retarded child. Mental retardation is often detected early in life.

COHEN: Molly Jo Daly had been warehoused at state institution, just like tens of thousands of other disabled children across the country. It was called Fairview. As many as 40 children lived in one room, according to Oregon officials. Fairview patients were sometimes restrained in leather cuffs, isolated for long periods of time. And sterilized. Jeff discovered a film the state had made about Fairview. In it he spotted Molly and he read her personal file.

DALY: I would read page after page where they said Molly was kept in a straight jacket all day long. That she was restrained. That she was even medicated.

COHEN: He noticed how much worse she looked each year.

DALY: Molly and other folks would sometimes throw themselves to the floor and they would bang their heads on the pavement. They would break windows and cut themselves because what that meant was somebody would take care of them, they'd have a nurse that would bandage them up and they'd go get to see a doctor.

COHEN: So how could Jeff's parents send their only daughter here when she was only two? Phil Lynch, Executive Director of the Oregon Council of Developmental Disabilities says it is hard for us today to understand what it was like 50 years ago.

PHIL LYNCH, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OREGON COUNCIL OF DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES: The doctor would say that it would be better for you, it would be better for your child, it would be better for your other children if you simply turned your child over to the state for institutionalization.

COHEN: Many parents obliged, especially since there were few public school programs available back then for children with disabilities.

There was a lot of shame at that time in having a disabled child.

DALY: It was shame, it was part of society, it was how you were looked at by your friends.

COHEN: After a series of lawsuits, the state closed Fairview in 2000. Two years later the governor apologized for what he called "the great wrong done to helpless citizens entrusted to the care of the state of Oregon." After Fairview closed, its residents were scattered all around the state of Oregon, making them difficult to find. But Jeff was lucky. His father kept meticulous records.

DALY: I found a file in my dad's filing cabinet that was buried away back in the closet. We found a file that said "Molly."

COHEN: Inside a phone number.

DALY: I was able to hear the person on the other line say that Molly Daly is sitting right across from me.

COHEN: Do you think your father wanted you to find her?

DALY: Totally. He wanted us to find Molly. He wanted me to find Molly. I know that for sure. Molly!

COHEN: After nearly 50 years apart, Jeff found his Molly. They were re-united as brother and sister. Jeff was relieved to find that she lives in a group home where she's loved and well cared for. Jeff was lucky to have his father's records to guide him. But it is a lot harder for other families. Jeff was inspired to help.

So in 2005, Jeff, his wife, Cindy, and Molly went to the Oregon capitol and with Molly by his side, Jeff testified to the legislature to make it easier to access records so other brothers and sisters can re-unite. It's called Molly's law and it's become a model across the country.

DALY: Molly's room from what we have found from old film and old pictures was over here in the corner.

COHEN: Jeff made a documentary to inspire others to search for family members who had been sent to institutions.

DALY: Old McDonald had a farm

COHEN: Now, 50 years later, Jeff finally answered the question, where's Molly? The question he asked so many times as a boy. He and his sister are making up for lost time. He visits often and has become her legal guardian.

DALY: Is this better than a walk?

COHEN: Playing together, like they did 50 years ago. Molly now has a family. And Jeff has his sister back.

DALY: We can go higher!

COHEN: Elizabeth Cohen, CNN, Seaside, Oregon.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KEILAR: Really an amazing story. There is so much more to it. You can read more about Jeff's journey, or if you want to find a lost loved one, just logon to CNN.com and go to our health section.

HOLMES: We do want to tell you folks we are continuing to follow the breaking developments out of Utah for the rescue of those six miners.

We do understand that a second drill has broken through to the area where the miners are believed to be. There is a larger hole that was drilled from the other one the other day, that first hole. Not sure if they exactly hit the right cavity but this is a larger hole where they do believe they'll be able to now put down a camera and take a look around the area where they believe the miners are.

However, we got news that that development just about an hour ago that the drill had broken through to that new cavity, however, it will still be a couple of hours, we understand, from the mine owner before the camera can get down there.

Also, when that camera gets down there, there is no guarantee that in fact that camera will be able to give us real answers to what has happened to those miners. Also, work is going on in the actual mine where people are digging trying to get to them as well.

So again we've got developments going on here with this story this morning. Stay here with us. CNN will have all the latest developments as they happen, but again we are expecting possibly in the next couple of hours to get some word of the camera getting down there and taking a look around.

What you are seeing on your screen right now, I do believe, are AP photos, appears to be Bob Murray there on the right, the owner of the mine. These are AP photos that have just been released a short time ago of Murray and others that took a tour down into the mine. These are pictures of the area where some of that work is going on where miners and workers are actually digging and trying to physically get to the area where the miners are believed to be.

Forgive us, we are navigating around that Web site but some of the pictures just being released on the web, some of the first pictures we are actually seeing out of that mine itself where, again, Bob Murray took a few people down to kind of take a tour around see what was happening.

Again, stay right here with CNN. This is a fast-moving story, a developing story. Expecting a lot more development, and major developments this morning. We have John Zarrella live on the scene. Stay right here with CNN. Quick break. Be right back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

HOLMES: We continue to follow the breaking developments out of the Utah mine rescue effort. The latest here for you now -- a second larger drill has punched through into the cavity where six miners are believed to be trapped. Right now the workers are removing that drill, then they will take a camera and lower it down into that hole and hope that that camera can take a look around and possibly give us some real answers to the fate of these miners. We are expecting possibly to get word of what that camera sees in the next few hours. That's according to the mine owner, Bob Murray.

Also, coming up in a less than two hours, we will talk to Bob Murray and also we are expecting the families possibly to get an update around 10:30 from Bob Murray as well, 10:30 Eastern time. When we get updates from that we'll bring them to you as well. But a lot of fast-moving developments this morning now that that second drill has broken through to a larger area so possibly can camera with k go down and look around. We understand it has a wide range of where it can look around at a 360-degree angle.

So we could possibly get some answers but at the same time it is a possibility we might not get any definite word when that camera gets down there. But breaking and fast-moving developments this morning. Stay here with CNN. We'll continue to bring those to you as soon as they come into us.

KEILAR: Also in the next half hour we'll go back to Huntington, Utah for a live report on those efforts to reach those six trapped coal miners.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

WOLF: I'm Reynolds Wolf and here's a look at your forecast around the nation. Heat is going to be the big story for us today with a high of 99 in Dallas, 102 in Memphis, 99 in Atlanta and 97 in Orlando. I'll let you know when this heat wave is going to end coming up in a few moments.

You're watching CNN SATURDAY MORNING. The next hour starts right now.

KEILAR: Let's get you updated on the breaking news this morning in the Utah mine collapse. The big development is that a second larger drill has broken through into the cavity where the workers are believed to be trapped. So right now crews are removing that drill so that they can lower a camera into the hole. This is a process that could play out over the next few hours.

And CNN's John Zarrella is following this unfolding situation. He joins us live now from Huntington, Utah. John, what's the latest?

ZARRELLA: Brianna, it was just over an hour ago when Bob Murray, the mine operator, came out and told all of us here that, in fact, they had punched through and were in the coal seam, which is the cavity where they believe the six miners are trapped.

At the same time, he himself had just come from the main mine shaft -- that's the horizontal shaft where the initial collapse took place nearly a week ago now. And the work there to remove all of the debris so rescue workers can physically get in there. And Murray, who looked very, very haggard, very worn, very tired, talked about both of these efforts that are going on.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

BOB MURRAY, PRES. & CEO, MURRAY ENERGY: The activity is at a very fast pace. The progress is way too slow for me and I think for anyone. But it's not because of effort. We have advanced 650 feet from where the damage from the earthquake started in the direction of the men and we encountered our first piece of machinery that they would use near the face of the mine, which was a cable sled. And they haven't even pulled it out yet and encountered it just before I came out.

QUESTION: Did you see that with your own eyes?

MURRAY: Yes.

QUESTION: What were your thoughts at that time?

MURRAY: I thought it was a pickup truck at first and we all did. And it's -- they were going to (INAUDIBLE) up to it and I said no, let's have water jacks props and get up there quickly and see what it is and that's what they did to bring a rope out to pull it up with a continuous miner. And but we couldn't. There was no point pulling it out. It turned out to be a cable sled, but we had the rope and everything ready to pull the pickup truck out if it was.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: The cable sled's just a thing that cable lays in. What was your question?

QUESTION: I was going to ask you if you had made any other comments about the progress of the 8 5/8-inch drill?

MURRAY: I'll talk about it at the press conference.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: We've intercepted the coal seam.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: No it's just intercepted it. We have no time to do anything or give any report but we have intercepted the coal seam where we said we would. That's all I can report right now.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: That's where the video will be put in but we must pull the drill steel to do that.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: No, those are just still pictures of the miners underground.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: As soon as they pull the drill steel. Two hours probably.

QUESTION: You were saying that (INAUDIBLE) the workers, they're doing the best they can, but it is slow. MURRAY: Yes, it is because of the amount of support they have to put in as they advance. There's just no other way to do it. Every 2 1/2 feet we set a very large water jack. You saw those props. We have to roof bolt and we have to put the wire mesh in against the ribs as we advance in to protect the rescue crews.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: I'm tired.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: It's always been a rescue mission. I don't see any -- when you say "recovery," I really don't know what you mean. It is a rescue mission. We're going in and get these men out.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: About the same as in the other entries, about six feet.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE)

MURRAY: The entry is about eight feet high and it's open on the first one to two feet, which is what I've said to you. And I showed you pictures of that. I brought you out pictures and your people went in and saw that. So it's open the first one or two feet but we can't get men over it. And then the rubble's about six feet deep and it's not changed.

QUESTION: How many oxygen tanks are down there? If they were to move for example to different shafts if at all possible ...

MURRAY: No, that wouldn't apply.

QUESTION: Not possible?

MURRAY: No, it is not a question that applies when you talk about oxygen tanks. You don't carry oxygen tanks.

QUESTION: I thought you mentioned early on that you had emergency situation ...

MURRAY: We have SCSRs, self-rescuing devices that are in a cache and that's not an oxygen tank.

QUESTION: (INAUDIBLE) degree of the rubble has been consistent all the way through then?

MURRAY: It has. They have hit some areas where it wasn't quite as heavy, but it's been consistent all the way in except for a few places.

QUESTION: Can you test the air quality ...

MURRAY: That wouldn't apply here. We have perfect air. We have 69,000 cubic feet of air where the recovery is going on, 69,000 cubic feet per minute. You get very cold and it's very windy, that's how much air we have.

QUESTION: How many men are down there right now?

MURRAY: 42.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

ZARRELLA: Now, the pictures that Bob Murray was referring to and some that you were seeing there while he was speaking, he took them this morning himself in the overnight hours down there in that mine when he went in to survey the progress. Of course, that firsthand look that he had inside the mine of the work going on.

And that is in that main section of tunnel that originally collapsed where they are actually digging out all of that debris. You heard him reference that it's about six feet deep in debris and then there's about a foot to two foot clearance, but it's not enough to get anyone in of the rescue team to actually crawl through there to try and reach the cavity where they believe the miners are.

Now, at this point, as far as that 8 5/8-inch hole, it's going to be at least a couple more hours before we'll have any indication of whether they have a camera down there and whether the camera is able to see anything. At this point, Brianna, we still don't have any word on whether they've gotten any devices down there to check for oxygen levels or any dangerous gases within that cavity -- Brianna.

KEILAR: And John, have they said what the next step is, whether they see something or perhaps if they don't see something? Where do they go from here?

ZARRELLA: That's I think the bottom line on all this is if they see something and they see the miners and that they are alive, well, then, they will be able to get food down to them and more water down to them, using that 8 5/8-inch hole to do that. If they don't see them alive, if they do not see any activity in that cavity, then they're back to what I think is square one and the last recourse, which is simply to keep digging for probably now at least another four or five days because they've got a good thousand feet to go in that main tunnel.

And they're going to have to keep digging until they can get rescue workers into that cavity. And there's no guarantee even that these miners are in that cavity. There could have been other -- when we had all these aftershocks Brianna, a couple of days after the initial collapse and a couple of hours after the initial collapse, there's some concern that perhaps other portions were partitioned and they may be somewhere else in the mine -- Brianna.

KEILAR: Thanks, John, for that report. John Zarrella has been following this story overnight. He continues to follow this story as we see developments. We're going to be checking back in with him. You can see much more on the trapped miners going to cnn.com. You can watch the treacherous conditions that rescuers are facing. You can see some amazing pictures, view some I-reports that we have in to CNN and even more. Just go to cnn.com. Also tonight at 8:00 Eastern, a CNN Special Investigations Unit looks back at the Sago mine tragedy. What really happened, and could it have been prevented? Inside the Sago mine tragedy, that's tonight and tomorrow night at 8:00 Eastern.

And a reminder that we will bring you an interview with mine operator Bob Murray coming up in just a couple of hours. That's ahead in the 10:00 a.m. Eastern hour of CNN NEWSROOM and stay with CNN for continued updates on the mine rescue effort.

HOLMES: And new this morning, word of a possible terror threat against three major American cities, this time involving radioactive materials.

CNN's Allan Chernoff live in New York City for us with the latest. Allan, alarming to hear but still unsubstantiated.

CHERNOFF: Absolutely, T.J. It's another unverified report of a threat against the United States. Here you see just part of the response from the New York City police department. These officers right now are checking vehicles for any radiological material. Let's talk a little bit about the threat. It's on an Israeli Web site called debka.com (ph), which is a private site. It's a counterterrorism Web site and it says that on Thursday there was chatter on internal al Qaeda Web sites talking about threats against the U.S.

One threat against New York City and specifically against the Wall Street district, which is about 10, 12 blocks to the south of where we're standing right now at the corner of Broadway and Canal. It said that there would be a truck filled with radioactive material hitting the Wall Street area. Another threat on the Web site, at least reported on that Web site, that there could be an attack against either New York, Miami or Los Angeles.

Let us emphasize right now none of this has been verified. The New York City police department, the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI all saying again, this is not verified. Nonetheless, the New York City police department taking these precautions.

What they're doing here, first of all, they've narrowed out Broadway right over here, one lane of traffic. They then have officers holding handheld detectors of radioactive material. They are stopping all trucks, having trucks and vans move over to the side. So even after inspecting them with the detector, they're also going into those vehicles and checking them out.

You can see right over there, the man in the blue jacket is holding that handheld radioactive detector and there is another one as well further down. These officers here have been on duty for more than eight hours. They're just being replaced, so a change in shifts. But, again, let's emphasize the report is not verified. Nonetheless, we have precautions being taken here also from the air and out in the water. So the New York City police department trying to hit all angles of this.

Back to you.

HOLMES: All right, Allan Chernoff for us there in New York, a lot of activity there. Allan, thank you so much for that report. We want to remind you folks that we here at CNN are committed to providing you the most reliable coverage of news that affects your security. Stay here with us for the latest information day or night.

KEILAR: And, of course, we are keeping you up to date on the breaking news unfolding in the Utah mine rescue effort. A second larger drill has punched through into the cavity where six miners are believed to be trapped. Right now the drill is being removed so that workers can then lower a camera into the hole in an attempt to locate the miners. That's expected to happen within the next few hours.

HOLMES: And a sad first to tell you about in Iraq. CNN's Barbara Starr has a report on the first nurse to die in combat there.

WOLF: And we've been talking about all the heat in the U.S. The tropics are heating up too, especially in the Pacific. Coming up, we're going to talk about hurricane Flossie. Where she's headed and what may happen as we make our way into the rest of your weekend. That's coming up right here on CNN SATURDAY.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KEILAR: Army nurse Maria Ortiz went to Iraq to heal the wounded and tend to the dying. Then a mortar ended her life. She's the first army nurse to die in combat since the Vietnam War. More now from our Pentagon correspondent Barbara Starr.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

BARBARA STARR, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): A summer rain blew in as Maria Ortiz's family and friends gathered at her burial at Arlington National Cemetery. Army Captain Ortiz, the nurse with the huge smile, volunteered to go to Iraq. Colleagues and friends say she felt she had to go.

LT. COL. KATHLEEN WILTSIE, U.S. ARMY NURSE CORPS: She was willing to make that sacrifice in order to serve the soldiers that were there.

STARR: The nurse who treated countless young troops was killed in Baghdad last month as she walked through the green zone, the one area that is supposed to be secure. Ortiz was the first army nurse to be killed in combat since the Vietnam War. Since enlisting in the army as a private, she earned three college degrees and became an officer. Juan Casiano was Maria's fiance.

JUAN CASIANO, MARIA ORTIZ'S FIANCE: She had a lot of love and she didn't give it all to me. She always gave it to everyone else.

STARR: This nurse is already deeply missed.

WILTSIE: Oh, yes, very much so. We were all expecting her back soon. Not like this.

STARR: Captain Maria Ortiz was just one of more than 75 military women who have now died in Iraq.

Barbara Starr, CNN, the Pentagon.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KEILAR: And tonight on "This Week at War," Iran's influence in the Mideast region and what the White House calls the Iraq troop surge. Is it working? You can join host Tom Foreman for "This Week at War" tonight at 7:00 Eastern and also tomorrow at 1:00.

HOLMES: We do want to let you folks know that we are continuing to follow those efforts to rescue those six trapped miners. This story continues to update this morning. What you need to know right now is that in fact, a second drill has broken through into the cavity where they believe the six men are trapped. They do expect to send a camera down through that second hole, a larger hole, send that down there and take a look around.

So at some point here in the next couple of hours, we could know what that camera sees and finally have some real answers to exactly what has happened to these men. That is the latest development this morning. We are continuing to follow that. As soon as we get more information, we will not wait a second to bring it to you. Stay here.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

CAROL COSTELLO, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Summer means fun in the sun, but that same sun can make running outdoors tough.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The heat can be a significant limiting factor to what is physically possible. If you try to run at a pace that is faster than your body can get rid of the heat that you're generating, then the body will begin to raise temperature and the mind then becomes clouded.

COSTELLO: So what should running fanatics do?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: If you're running and you begin to feel a little confused, your mind is not working as sharp as it should be. If paradoxically you begin to become chilled, if you feel a little nauseated and queasy in the stomach, these are indications you might be becoming overheated.

COSTELLO: If you or a workout partner notices that you've overdone it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You need to stop and walk. We think walking is better than sitting and laying down.

COSTELLO: Dr. Wilkins (ph) says that's because it's important to keep circulation of the air across the skin. He also says, when the heat rises, try to lower your intensity and spend less time outdoors. Happy trails. Carol Costello, CNN.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

HOLMES: Keeping you updated here on the breaking story we have out of Utah, the effort to rescue those six trapped miners. The major development we got just a couple of hours ago, we want to bring to you now, is that a second drill has broken through into the area where the miners are believed to be trapped. The workers are then going to remove the drill and then lower a camera down into that hole, hoping to locate the miners. That was the word. We've been following this for the past couple of hours now.

As soon as we got that word and the mine owner said that it might take a couple of hours from that point to get the camera down in there. That would put us at right about now, actually. It's been a couple of hours since we got that word. So they are working to get the camera down there. So really, we are working to or waiting to hear word, and really we could get that at any minute that that camera has, in fact, made it down into that cavity and is going to take a look around. This might be the first real chance and real answers we have to the fate of these miners.

We are following the breaking developments out of Utah. As soon as they come into us, they will be brought or passed along directly to you.

KEILAR: And this is a very complex story, this mine disaster in Utah. We've got a lot of features on cnn.com that can make it more clear for you though and Josh Levs is here to tell us more about that.

LEVS: We want to help paint a picture for people because everybody pretty much has the sense now if you're following us that a camera is going down into this dark mine. It's kind of tough to envision. You can get the basic idea, but a mine can be complicated. I want to show you what we have on cnn.com right now, very helpful. It's helping us. It will help you. It will show you the map of this specific mine and where the camera is going down as well as where it's believed the miners are. So you're able to trace the process of how authorities are trying to get a camera exactly to where they believe these miners are.

It's interactive. When you go to the main story on cnn.com now, click "interactive," you'll see it. Also quickly I want to show you, we also have background of who these miners are. Remember six individuals down there with families. You've got photos of them, background about who they are, how long they've been with the mine, a lot to tell you about each of these guys. I'll tell you one more thing before I toss it back to you all.

I was just talking to Reynolds Wolf. Weather today in Utah he tells me is topping off around 88 degrees. So at least the folks in Utah who are carrying out this mission and continuing this effort are not battling the same heat that a lot of other people in the country right now are. We are going to keep following this both at cnn.com as well as right here at CNN all day. As soon as those photos are available from that camera, that they're hoping will make it into the area, where it's believed the miners are, we'll have those photos for you right away. Stick with us throughout the day, guys.

KEILAR: I'm glad we have that information about the families because really at the heart of this, it's about these six men. We should also mention that it's not the mine officials who have confirmed their identities or told CNN things about these men. It's actually the families who have come forward and given details to paint a picture for us about who these six guys are.

LEVS: Right. Sometimes it's yearbook photos, old photos, a lot of the families have come forward to the media and to us specifically. And they wanted us to know who these people are so that we are able to share that as part of the story, six individuals who are trapped. And obviously that's what it all boils down to these guys who we are looking for right there.

KEILAR: All right, thank you, Josh Levs, for your report.

HOLMES: As Josh was telling us, as you know, we have been following this story closely, and we will continue to follow the developments out of Utah.

KEILAR: Also this morning, we're going to have the latest from the efforts to locate those lost miners. Our John Zarrella, he is at the mine and he's going to have any developments as they happen. We will bring them to you as soon as we get word.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

HOLMES: Again, the breaking update out of Utah and the rescue efforts for six miners there is that a second drill has made its way into the cavity where they believe the six miners are trapped.

TO ORDER A VIDEO OF THIS TRANSCRIPT, PLEASE CALL 800-CNN-NEWS OR USE OUR SECURE ONLINE ORDER FORM LOCATED AT www.voxant.com