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CNN SUNDAY MORNING

Getting Ready to Vote; Protesters Close Three Bases in Libya; Combating PTSD Using Scent; Civilians Held at Gunpoint, Handcuffed; Runaway Productions Impact Hollywood; Voters ID Law Challenged; Libyans Fight Back Against Radical Groups; Candidates Hit the Road

Aired September 23, 2012 - 06:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


RANDI KAYE, CNN ANCHOR: From CNN world headquarters in Atlanta, this is EARLY START WEEKEND.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MICHELLE OBAMA, FIRST LADY: We cannot let anyone discourage us from casting our ballots.

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KAYE: Seventy-three million eligible voters who aren't registered to vote. Now both parties are racing to get them to the polls and win them over to their side.

A new treatment for a crippling problem. Why using scent is helping veterans recover from PTSD.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOHN F. KENNEDY, FORMER U.S. PRESIDENT (voice-over): What's your judgment as to the chances they'll fire these things off if we invade Cuba?

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: John F. Kennedy like you've never heard him before. Secret White House tapes just released that even his staff didn't know about.

It is Sunday, September 23rd. Good morning, everyone. So glad you're with us. I'm Randi Kaye.

We start with politics this morning. With just 44 days to go until the presidential election, the countdown is on. And the countdown is on for the first debate, now just a week and a half away. But the candidates are already debating each other on the campaign trail.

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MITT ROMNEY (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I know you heard the president this week say something unusual. He said -- he said that he can't fix Washington from the inside. That that can only be done from the outside. And we're going to give him a chance on November 6th to do that. The truth is, he has proven that he cannot fix Washington from the inside.

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: I made this point down in Florida a couple days ago, saying that you can't change Washington just from the inside. You've got to mobilize the American people. You change it with the help of Americans who are willing to make their voices heard. My opponent got really excited. He thought, oh, you know, he quickly rewrote his speech. He said, I'll get the job done from the inside. What kind of inside job is he talking about? Inside job rubber stamping a top-down agenda from this Republican Congress? We don't want that.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: President Obama was in Wisconsin, one of the key swing states that we've been keeping an eye on. But in the latest polls, you see it there, Wisconsin seems to be swinging back to the president. Obama has a nine-point lead in the state right now.

One challenge facing both parties is apathy, voters deciding to stay home on Election Day because they just aren't excited by the candidates. First Lady Michelle Obama talked about it last Washington last night. She talked about the impact just one vote can have. She also made mention of voter ID laws that could take the ballot right out of voter's hands.

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MICHELLE OBAMA, FIRST LADY: We all get a say in our democracy, no matter who we are or where we're from or what we look like or who we love. So we cannot let anyone discourage us from casting our ballots. We cannot let anyone make us feel unwelcome in the voting booth.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: While the candidates and their surrogates rally people to vote for them, there's an army of people hitting the streets to make sure people know how to vote. Athena Jones takes a look.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ATHENA JONES, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): It's a fixture at every Obama campaign rally, a voting call to arms. And Saturday in Wisconsin was no different.

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: You remember my opponent wanted to let Detroit go bankrupt. Don't boo, vote.

He wants to let the oil companies write the energy plan. Don't boo. I'm asking you for your vote.

JONES (on camera): Some 37 million Americans are eligible to vote but aren't registered according to census figures. So registering people and educating them about how to vote is central to both campaigns here in Wisconsin and in other states where the race could be very close.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Does anybody need to update their voter registration or apply for an absentee ballot?

JONES (voice-over): In Virginia, a key battleground state, the Republican National Committee took advantage of a Romney rally this month in Fairfax to register attendees.

MICHAEL SHORT, REPUBLICAN NATIONAL COMMITTEE: When you have this many people in one place, it makes registered folks a lot easier.

JONES: That ease is also part of the appeal for voters.

LINNEA FARNSWORTH, NEWLY REGISTERED: I picked up a form at the library last week, but I hadn't actually done it. So this is great to be able to just sit and just do it and get it done right now.

SHORT: We've got one of the best ground game operations here in Virginia. We've registered and made contact with over 300,000 people just in the last week. And 150,000 just last weekend alone.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Hi. Is your voter registration up to date?

JONES: A few days later, we caught up with Obama supporters in nearby Herndon, Virginia, registering voters at local businesses.

LAWRENCE BUSSEY, OBAMA CAMPAIGN VOLUNTEER: They won't have a voice unless they vote, unless they register. So that's my purpose. What I try to do is go where the folks are and -- barber shops, beauty parlors, libraries, back to school night. And this is a good place to start.

And where did you live before?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Alexandria.

BUSSEY: In Alexandria. Yes, you would need to re-register to vote.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes.

JONES: Beyond getting them registered, campaigns say it's also important to make sure voters know what to bring to the polls. Virginia, like most states, requires voters to present identification to vote. While Virginia doesn't mandate a photo I.D., laws in about a dozen states do. Several more face court challenges. The laws, supporters say, they're needed to prevent voter fraud.

HANS VON SPAKOVSKY, HERITAGE FOUNDATION: Whoever wins the upcoming presidential race, I want everyone to say, yep, whoever's declared the winner, they won and there's no doubt about that person's mandate because of questions over the election process.

JONES: A recent poll in three swing states found a majority support photo I.D. laws. But critics argue they make it hard for citizens, especially the poor, the elderly and minorities, who may not have access to the proper I.D., to vote.

PAGE GARDNER, PRESIDENT, VOTER PARTICIPATION CENTER: The laws are designed to discourage people from showing up at the polls by requiring certain kinds of I.D.s and making people go through certain hoops and making it harder.

JONES: So as campaigns race to register voters ahead of looming deadlines, voters themselves will have to make sure they're ready and able to cast their ballot.

Athena Jones, CNN, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: A judge in Colorado has ruled on a different kind of voter I.D. case. This one was meant to stop the state from putting bar codes on the ballot. "The Denver Post" reports that opponents argue that the bar codes would make each ballot traceable to the voter, but the judge ruled in favor of the bar codes saying there is absolutely no fundamental right to a secret ballot in the U.S. Constitution.

Mitt Romney is speaking out about the plane scare involving his wife. The campaign plane carrying Ann Romney made an emergency landing in Denver Friday after the cockpit filled with smoke. Ann Romney eventually made it to Los Angeles and was there last night when her husband talked about the incident.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MITT ROMNEY (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: I appreciate the fact that she is on the ground, safe and sound. And I don't think she knows just how worried some of us where. When you have a fire in the -- in an aircraft, there's no place to go exactly. There's no -- and you can't find any oxygen from outside to aircraft to get in the aircraft because the windows don't open. I don't know why they don't do that. But it's a -- it's a real problem. So it's very dangerous. And she was choking and rubbing her eyes. And, fortunately, there was enough oxygen for the pilot and co-pilot to make a safe landing in Denver.

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KAYE: Sounds pretty scary. No one was injured on the plane. A Secret Service agent even joked with Ann Romney's mother saying it was supposed to be a nonsmoking flight.

Now to Pakistan where a government official is offering a $100,000 reward for the death of the anti-Islam filmmaker. Here he is. He's the Railway (ph) minister and says he was speaking for himself when he made the offer, not as a government representative. Pakistan's prime minister condemned the bounty.

And around the world, people protested against the U.S. and anti-Islam of film "Innocence of Muslims," yesterday. There were peaceful protests like this one in Germany and more in Nigeria, Bangladesh and in Pakistan. But in Libya, people are protesting for democracy and are fighting back against radical Islamists. Reports say three Islamist militia bases will be closed in the wake of protesting. Our senior international correspondent Arwa Damon is in Benghazi, Libya.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE) ARWA DAMON, CNN CORRESPONDENT: The events that unfolded on Friday in Benghazi most certainly, at least at this point in time, seem to be having a ripple-on effect. To begin with, what happened Friday in the afternoon, pro-democracy demonstrators took to the streets demanding an end to the existence of armed militias, demanding that the government forces, the army and the police, be the only authority on the streets of the country. Following that, at night we saw hundreds of individuals storming one of the headquarters of a known militant group (INAUDIBLE) in Benghazi,

After they initially managed to peacefully pretty much take over that location, they then set their sights on a second area. This, however, turned out to be a battalion that is, in fact, endorsed by the government. It did result in some clashes that caused injuries and casualties. And then the army, eventually, in the early hours of the morning, moving in, especially trying to secure massive weapons, depots that did exist there.

We arrived on site and saw some of the heavy weaponry that the army was trying to secured. Looters, however, had managed to make off with some of the lighter weapons, ammunition, rocket-propelled grenades. At one of the brigade headquarters that is also endorsed by the government, we saw a number of detainees that people said had been taken into custody in conjunction with the assault of that government- endorsed battalion headquarters.

Most certainly it's a very chaotic and volatile situation. Many Libyans we've been talking to in Benghazi saying that this is part of the populations being fed up with the government's inability to reign in these various militias, causing people to really try to take the situation into their own hands. We were hearing late Saturday night that two more known militant extremist Islamic bases had shut down as well. This time to the east of Benghazi in the city of (INAUDIBLE). This, an area that the U.S. itself has been monitoring for quite some time due to the militant activity there. The people saying that they really want to begin to see affirmative action from their government. They are fed up with the impunity that militias here do tend to be able to operate with. They do want to see this city, this country moving towards the path that the revolution originally intended it for.

Arwa Damon, CNN, Benghazi, Libya.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: And this morning, the leader of Libya's national Congress pledged to dissolve militias in Libya and asked people to stop carrying weapons.

To the Netherlands now, where a girl's sweet 16 party was anything but sweet. This is never a good sign for a birthday party. Police in Haren, Holland, arrested dozens at the party. Look at that scene there. It seems there were a few uninvited guests. All right, maybe a few thousand uninvited guests. You see, the party invitation got posted on FaceBook, which sent it spiraling out of control. The family even canceled the party, but that didn't stop people from showing up anyway. What a mess.

To New York now. We told you about the guy who was mauled by a tiger at the Bronx Zoo after he jumping into the enclosure. Well, apparently he's telling police that he wanted to be one with the tiger. Yes, wanted to be one with the tiger. Maybe that means he wanted to be in the tiger's belly. I don't know. We don't know. But David Villalobos is in the hospital right now. He'll be arraigned on trespassing charges probably as soon as he gets out, if not sooner.

And finally, you probably heard about that ancient piece of papyrus that referred to Jesus's wife. It's caused quite a stir. But now a new testament scholar says it looks more like a forgery. He admits the papyrus could be authentic, but that the writing on it is a modern translation of an old Coptic language and that the message may have gotten mixed up during that translation.

Just a year ago, two American hikers were released from an Iranian prison. We'll tell you what they're up to now.

Plus, chaos in downtown Seattle. A security guard takes a bullet, but doesn't let it stop him. Foiling the robbery.

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KAYE: Good morning, New York City. Look at that gorgeous shot of Central Park there. You can see the reservoir there in the distance, and what a beautiful sky as well. Thanks for waking up with us here on EARLY START WEEKEND.

The United Nations General Assembly will meet this weekend in New York. Here's some of what we're expecting. President Obama is expected to speak about the attacks on U.S. embassies and protests in the Middle East. And the U.N. will address the civil war in Syria and concerns that Iran could obtain a nuclear weapon.

But we're also going to be looking out for those incendiary or awkward moments like we've seen in the years past. Remember last year when Iran's president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, spoke? He criticized the U.S. and talked about his suspicions about the Holocaust and 9/11. Dozens of delegates from the U.S. and European nations walked right out of there.

The General Assembly coincides with the anniversary of the release of two American hikers from an Iranian prison. It was seen as a political move by Ahmadinejad. Josh Fattal and Shane Bauer spent more than two years in prison after being detained near the Iraq/Iran border. Sarah Shourd was jailed too, but was released after about a year. Fattal spoke to CNN at an event in New York's Central Park celebrating his year of freedom yesterday.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOSH FATTAL, SPENT MORE THAN 2 YEARS IN IRANIAN PRISON: I feel way better than a year ago, that's for sure. Well, actually I was feeling really good a year ago because I was out one day and it was damn good right then. But, no, I feel good. I mean it's been -- it's been quite a year. And it feels like a good way to celebrate. Yes, I'm just waiting for Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and his entourage to come. They're probably down on 5th Avenue shopping for a bunch of capitalist luxuries and so we want him to bring that stuff to the (INAUDIBLE) free market. Hopefully they'll (ph), you know, spread the wealth.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: The three hikers are working on a tell-all book that is scheduled to be released next year.

An unwanted Japanese import. Danger off the coast of Hawaii as tsunami debris comes floating in. Today, a warning.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Welcome back. Time to check some stories making news in your backyard.

We will start in Hawaii, where a runaway dock has been spotted off the coast of Maui. It's believed to be tsunami debris from Japan. One scientist says it's likely one of four missing docks that broke away during the March 2011 storm. Fishermen are a little concerned the dock could damage boats if it gets close to shore.

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GEORGE WHITE, FISHERMAN: I'd hate to have to be traveling at night and no beacons or nothing on it, you know what I mean? And some guys -- not everybody has radar.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It could seriously damage their boat.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: Now to Seattle.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: You guys good?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Back up, back up, back up.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: This was a scene after a jewelry store heist. Seems the suspected robber was trying to get away from a nearby hotel security guard when he tackled him. The guard was shot. You saw him in some pain there, but he still managed to hold onto the guy while people on the street ran in to help hold the suspect down. The guard was taken to the hospital but should be OK.

And in San Francisco, the champagne is flowing. That's because the Giants have won the west. They beat the San Diego Padres last night to clinch the national league western division title. The last time they did that, in 2010, they won the World Series.

And let's not forget about the Cincinnati Reds. They clinched the national league central title by beating the Dodgers yesterday.

The top 10 CNN Heroes have been named an now it's your chance to help us decide who will be the CNN Hero of the year and the winner of $250,000. Anderson Cooper tells you how to vote.

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ANDERSON COOPER, CNN: Now that we've announced the top 10 CNN Heroes of 2012, I want to show you how you can vote for the CNN Hero of the year. It's very easy. This is the main page of cnnheroes.com. Now down here you'll see all top 10 CNN Heroes. Each one will receive $50,000 plus a shot at becoming CNN Hero of the Year.

And that's where you come in. here's how you can vote for your favorite CNN Hero. As an example, I'm going to randomly click on Razia Jan over here. You can read a story about her work providing free education to girls in rural Afghanistan.

Now, the same kind of information will come up if you pick any of the top 10 CNN Heroes. And once you're ready to pick the person who inspires you the most, click "vote" in red right over here. A new page then comes up. It shows you all top 10 CNN Heroes. You choose the person you want to vote for. I'm going to say here, just as an example, Leo McCarthy (ph). His photo will show up down here under your selection. Then, you just enter your e-mail over here in step two. You enter the security code, and you click on the red box right down here that says vote.

You can vote up to 10 times every day with your e-mail address and through FaceBook and then rally your friends by sharing your choice on FaceBook over here or on Twitter. And, remember, you can vote from your computer, your phone, your tabloid, pretty much any mobile device with a browser. Just go to cnnheroes.com. we'll reveal your 2012 Hero of the Year during "CNN Heroes: An All Star Tribute," which is a CNN tradition that promises to inspire.

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KAYE: John F. Kennedy secretly recorded hundreds of conversations while in office and they've never been heard until now.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JOHN F. KENNEDY, FORMER U.S. PRESIDENT (voice-over): Wait a minute, governor. Now, how long is it going to take you to get up there?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: About an hour.

KENNEDY: Now, I tell you, if you want to go up there, then you call me from up there, then we'll decide what we're going to do before we make any speeches about it.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: You'll hear more in just a moment.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: For the first time we are hearing conversations secretly recorded by former President John F. Kennedy while he was in office. These recordings have been under lock and key at the Kennedy Library Foundation for more than three decades.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MAURA PORTER: In July of 1962, President Kennedy asked the Secret Service to install a secret taping system in the Oval Office and the cabinet room of the White House. He also asked that they install a telephone system to record telephone conversations. In total there were 248 hours of meetings recordings and 17 and a half hours of telephone recordings. The recordings themselves were removed from the White House on the afternoon of November 22, 1963.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: Those conversations, telephone calls and dictations will be released the week, giving us a rare glimpse into Kennedy's presidency and the conversations that preserve his legacy. But here's a preview. One of those conversations took place at the height of the civil rights movement. In 1962, riots and chaos erupts at the University of Mississippi when James Meredith attempted to register at the all white school. There's a heated conversation between Kennedy and then Mississippi Governor Ross Barnett.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ROSS BARNETT, FORMER MISSISSIPPI GOVERNOR (voice-over): I'll tell you what I'll do, Mr. President. I'll go up there myself.

JOHN F. KENNEDY, FORMER U.S. PRESIDENT (voice-over): Well, how long will it take you to get there?

BARNETT: I'll get a microphone and tell them that you have agreed to -- for him to be removed.

KENNEDY: Now, now, now, wait a minute. How long -- wait a minute, governor. Now, how long is it going to take you to get up there?

BARNETT: About an hour.

KENNEDY: Now I tell you -- if you want to go up there, and then you call me from up there, then we'll decide what we're going to do before you make any speeches about it.

BARNETT: Well, all right.

KENNEDY: No sense in --

BARNETT: I mean whether he -- if you don't --

KENNEDY: See, but don't -- we've got an hour to go and that's not -- we may not have an hour but it will take you an hour to get up there.

BARNETT: This man had just died.

KENNEDY: Did he die?

BARNETT: Yes.

KENNEDY: Which one? State police.

BARNETT: That's a state policeman.

KENNEDY: Yes. Well, you see, we've got to get order up there and that's what we thought was going to happen.

BARNETT: Well, just, please, why don't -- can't you do an order to try to remove Meredith?

KENNEDY: How can I remove him, governor, when there's a riot in the street. Now he may step out of that building and something happen to him. I can't remove him under those conditions. You get -- let's get order up there and then we can do something about Meredith.

BARNETT: We can surround him with plenty of officials.

KENNEDY: Well, we've got to get somebody up there now to get order and stop the firing and the shooting and then you and I will talk on the phone about Meredith. First we've got to get order.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KENNEDY: Amazing access there. The full audio book, "Listening In: The Secret White House Recordings of John F. Kennedy," will be available in bookstores on Tuesday.

For many of our veterans, the sights, sounds, and smells of war often trigger memories of combat in an instant, but researchers in Florida are using that to their advantage and it's all to help treat PTSD. We'll have more on this remarkable new program.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Good morning and thanks for starting your morning with us and a special welcome to our troops watching us on the American Forces Network. It is about 30 minutes past the hour.

I'm Randi Kaye. Here's a look at some stories that we're watching right now. In Pakistan, a government official is offering a $100,000 reward for the death of man who made the anti-Islamic film that has sparked violence overseas. The country's railway minister made the offer yesterday saying that the money is his own and that he is not acting as a government official. The Pakistani government condemns the move.

Back in the U.S., a double amputee in a wheelchair was shot to death by police at a group home in Houston after threatening officers with a pen. Caretakers called police when they say the man who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia became aggressive. When they arrived, he threatened the police with what appeared to be a metal object that turned out to be a pen. The officer has been placed on administrative leave.

And in New York, a controversial plan to provide emergency birth control to teenagers. A new program will allow school nurses at 13 New York City high schools to give students plan B and other emergency contraceptions without telling their parents unless they specifically opt out. Condoms are already widely distributed at high schools but this is the first time hormonal birth control and plan B have been dispensed.

Thousands of our military troops fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan are coming home, broken. Suffering not only the physical effects, but also the mental effects of war. The Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that anywhere from 11 to 20 percent of our troops returning from Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. They estimate about 10 percent of gulf war veterans are affected in about 30 percent of Vietnam veterans.

Well, there are several treatment options for PTSD, not all of them works, certainly not for everyone. But therapists at the University of Central Florida think that they've hit on one that may, and it all centers on the sense of smell. It's called the trauma management therapy program and so far it has been a big success.

Here to tell us how it works, director of UCF Anxiety Disorders Clinic Deborah Beidel along with Army Sergeant First Class Kevin Todd, a recent graduate of the program.

Good morning to both of you. And thank you for being here.

DEBORAH BEIDEL, DIRECTOR, UCF ANXIETY DISORDERS CLINIC: Good morning.

KEVIN TODD, U.S VETERAN: Good morning.

BEIDEL: Thank you for having us.

KAYE: Deborah, I'm going to start with you. Why the sense of smell? Why is it such a trigger for those dealing with PTSD but also, why is it so important in the treatment of it?

BEIDEL: Well, smell is very unique in the traumatic memories. What we know is that smells are processed very quickly but more importantly they're processed in the part of the brain that also has to do with emotion, so what happens is this makes smells that are associated with the memory, very long-lasting smells, very long-lasting memories and also very powerful memories.

So, when we do treatment for people with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, the type of treatment that we do is called exposure therapy, and in that therapy we want to expose the person to everything that happened in that traumatic event. So, if smells are very powerful and are associated with that memory, then we need to include the sense of smell when we're doing the treatment. It makes the treatment more effective.

KAYE: So in terms of how each session works, just briefly, it sounds like you transport them, the troops through virtual reality, I guess, back to the war zone really.

BEIDEL: Well, what we do is in exposure therapy, we expose the person to exactly what it was that happened to them. So, we very specifically and uniquely use the event that happened to them, we recreate it with the use of some virtual reality, both the sights and the sounds and then, now also the smells that are associated with the event.

KAYE: And Kevin, you started the program in June of last year after more than two decades of service. How bad was your PTSD before you started?

TODD: Well, before I started the program, I would say that it was severe. I waited quite a while before I asked for help for the PTSD, but since I've been through the program, I have made great improvement.

KAYE: Did you have any hesitations about trying, I guess, this alternative form of treatment?

TODD: I didn't have any hesitations about trying the treatment itself. I had hesitation about asking for help for fear of what it might look like to the leadership, but I did not have any hesitations about trying the treatment after I decided to ask for help.

KAYE: You know, you hear that from so many veterans, so many troops who are afraid to ask for help because of how it might look. But Kevin, walk us through what your sessions were like. I mean, when you were exposed to those memories of war all over again, what did that feel like?

TODD: Well, I did not want to go back after the first treatment, I can tell you that. It had been -- like I said, it had been a long time since the traumatic event, and it took me a while to ask for help. And once I got back into that scenario, I did not want to go back but I did continue to go back through the treatment and I'm glad that I did.

KAYE: And it's supposed to decrease the emotion, right, of what they're feeling, Deborah, when you take them back to that event?

BEIDEL: Sure. With the process of exposure therapy, it really puts people back in the situation and helps process those memories. And as we do it over a number of sessions, what we find is that the emotion associated with the memory becomes release. In other words, we're not saying and we never would say that we're going to erase people's memories. But what we are saying is that when they have those specific thoughts or more specifically when they see something here in the United States that may remind them of something that happened over in Iraq and Afghanistan, they don't have panic attacks, they don't have problems sleeping at night. They don't have nightmares or we decrease their nightmares. So, the idea is that what we're trying to do is get anxiety associated with these traumatic events to decrease and hopefully eventually go away.

KAYE: And, Kevin, how are you doing now? How would you rate your symptoms?

TODD: I would -- since -- I've completed the program, I would say I'm doing at least 50 percent better if not a little more.

KAYE: Wow, that's great news. You're sleeping better?

TODD: I'm sleeping better than I was. The nightmares and stuff have decreased in intensity. I still have them, but not like I did prior to going into the program.

KAYE: Well, that is terrific news. I'm glad it's worked for you and it seems like it's working for others as well. Deborah Beidel, Kevin Todd, thank you both.

BEIDEL: Thank you.

TODD: You're welcome.

KAYE: Did police cross the line? Innocent teens hand cuffed, rifles pointed at mothers and 19 cars stopped in a barricade, all in the pursuit of an armed bank robbery, the full story ahead.

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KAYE: How far should police go to catch a bad guy? In pursuit of an armed bank robber, police in Aurora, Colorado stopped nearly two dozen cars, handcuffed teens, and pointed rifles at mothers. They went so far that the whole case could be thrown out. The suspect might go free. Ted Rowlands reports.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

TED ROWLANDS, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): Marci Strandberg stopped at a light on her way home from shopping near Denver, Colorado. The next thing she knew, police had her at gun point.

MARCI STRANDBERG, CAUGHT IN POLICE BLOCKADE: I said, I have kids in my car, and that rifle's pointed right at me.

ROWLANDS: Nineteen cars were held at this intersection that Saturday afternoon. Everyone was ordered out of their cars at gun point including children. The boy in the green shirt is 16-year-old Michael Hance.

MICHAEL HANCE, 16-YEARS-OLD: They had rifles, guns and everything pointed at me with shields and a canine dog.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A robbery just occurred with a gun at Wells Fargo.

ROWLANDS: Police were looking for this bank robber seen here wearing a beekeeper's mask and armed with an air horn and loaded gun. He had just made off with $25,000 from a Wells Fargo a few miles away.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Last seen wearing a beehive mask.

ROWLANDS (on camera): Police thought the bank robber was at this intersection because there was a GPS tracking device hidden in with the money. The problem is, they had no idea what car he could be in and because of that beekeeper's mask. They didn't even know what he looks like.

(voice-over): So everyone was treated as an armed and dangerous suspect.

STRANDBERG: We all had to have our hands showing and our arms out the window and we had to keep our arms like this.

ROWLANDS: One by one, police approached each car with guns and shields, nearly everyone was handcuffed. Marci's 4-year-old daughter who you can see she's carrying was asleep for most of the ordeal. Her 8-year-old son, however, was awake.

STRANDBERG: My son was crying and I kept telling him to keep his head down between his legs because I didn't know if open fire was going to happen.

ROWLANDS: That's Crystal Deguzman in handcuffs moments after she watched police take her son, 16-year-old, Michael, away at gun point.

CRYSTAL DEGUZMAN, CAUGHT IN POLICE BLOCKADE: I think any mom would be upset. Not knowing what's going to happen to your kid.

ROWLANDS: Police eventually searched this white expedition. Inside, they found two loaded guns, the money and the beekeeper's mask.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: They have a suspect in custody.

ROWLANDS: The 45-year-old Christian Pache, a school teacher with no criminal record, was arrested and charged with armed robbery. He's pled not guilty.

Was this a case of good police work, or did they go too far? Federal law gives police some leeway to detain citizens for a reasonable period of time as part of a criminal investigation.

DAVID LANE, CIVIL RIGHTS ATTORNEY: A little bit of inconvenience, you know, getting cuffed for a minute to see if you're armed, getting detained very briefly to see if there's some probable cause to believe you've done something. You do have to put up with that, but two hours at rifle point, I think that's a little excessive.

CHIEF DAN OATES, AURORA POLICE DEPARTMENT: No question we inconvenienced citizens. We feel badly about that. We apologize to them, but we've made a tough choice here and we arrested a very dangerous armed bank robber.

ROWLANDS: But what police did may have put the entire case in jeopardy. The accused robber's attorney says there was no probable cause to search the vehicle, and that police violated his client's rights by pressuring him to agree to a search after he initially refused.

If a judge agrees, all of the evidence, the guns, the money, the beekeeper's mask, could be thrown out because of the way it was collected, and as crazy as that sounds, some legal experts say they have an argument.

Tim Olson, who was among those handcuffed at the intersection, says that would send a message to police.

TIM OLSON, CAUGHT IN POLICE BLOCKADE: If the bank robber gets away with it, that says you didn't do your job properly.

ROWLANDS: The judge's ruling in the case should indicate whether police were doing their job or if they crossed the line. Ted Rowlands, CNN, Aurora, Colorado.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: It is finally here, the iPhone 5. But for all that hype, is it actually really that popular? We'll take a look at the phenomenon around the world.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: It has become a cultural touchstone, thousands of Apple fans lining of outside stores anticipation of the latest iPhone release. And Friday did not disappoint. Everywhere from New York and Chicago all the way to Sydney, Australia, the devoted came out in droves, to purchase the iPhone 5.

Nadia Bilchik is joining us now to talk about what's become a global phenomenon. All right. So, it seems like everyone either has the iPhone or wants one. But is that true everywhere? I mean, we hear a lot about of course here in the U.S.

NADIA BILCHIK, CNN EDITORIAL PRODUCER: Well, it is the most valuable company in the world worth $656 billion, but when it comes to the mobile market, it is in fact, it's not, the world leader.

KAYE: Really?

BILCHIK: Yes. What is the world leader is Google. They're android operating system owns 68 percent of world smart phones. Apple is only number two, earning 17 percent which is a culture of Google.

KAYE: That would surprise a lot of folks here I think. All right. So, when it comes to mobile, we know it's all about China, of course, the world most populous country. Is Apple a huge success there?

BILCHIK: A huge success. Well, they have over a billion mobile users, so while it's a huge success, it in fact doesn't have full market share. What it has is it's only fourth in China because first in China is Samsung with 19 percent. Apple in China has only 10 percent. But you wouldn't think that if you speak to Chinese. Yesterday, I spoke two Chinese students in the line waiting at the Apple store perimeter. And I said, I believe Samsung is number one but Apple is only number four in China. And they said to me, no, no, no. Apple is number one in China.

KAYE: So, they must be excited then in China about the release?

BILCHIK: Yes, they are, but it isn't released yet in China. Because there's no iPhone 5 available in China yet. And they'll have to be very, very careful about this one, Randi. Because when the iPhone 4S was released in China, they didn't open the stores on the date or time that they said they would, and there were riots. People threw eggs. People were absolutely furious. There was fighting going on.

KAYE: But it is here in the U.S., it has been released already and you got to actually check it out.

BILCHIK: I got to check out the lines. It is incredible. It's slightly bigger, and it has more apps, they're still having difficulty as I'm sure you've heard with some of the map applications. But this hasn't stop people. And it was so interesting. I went to Perimeter Mall yesterday, and I saw somebody who was exchanging. What she had done was sold her iPhone 4S to somebody for $350 and she bought the new phone, iPhone 5 for $400.

So, she does for only $50, she was making a huge profit and the woman who had bought the phone was about to get it unlocked. But they are, some analysts say that by Monday, there will be 10 million iPhone 5 sold, and in the first three days of this iPhone 5, actually exceeded an entire month of the iPhone 4s.

KAYE: That's incredible. All right, Nadia. Thank you. I appreciate that.

Back in the U.S., not everyone in Hollywood is celebrating the prime time Emmy Awards. The same show and films they honor are costing others their jobs.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Welcome back. Roll out the red carpet. The 64th annual Emmy awards are live from Los Angeles tonight and while celebrities and other a-listers are busy preparing for their big wins, production workers and crews behind the scenes feel like they are on the losing end of all the fanfare. Here's CNN's Kareen Wynter.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

KAREEN WYNTER, CNN CORRESPONDENT (voice-over): For a man who prefers to work behind the scenes of films like "Wedding Crashers" and TV shows like "Blind Justice," long-time key grip Gary Dagg never imagined he'd be part of an unscripted Hollywood story line.

GARY DAGG, HOLLYWOOD PRODUCTION WORKER: It's a shame but the whole paradigm of film making has changed.

WYNTER: Hollywood on the brink of losing its title as the entertainment capital of the world.

DAGG: The people that serve our industry and have served our industry for a long time, they're in a real big world hurt right now. WYNTER: A shrinking world of job opportunities that's left thousands of production workers including 29-year veteran Dagg feeling the pinch.

DAGG: It's the people that serve our industry, it's the people that cater, the people that run the flower shops, the once that our in the limo service.

WYNTER: Hollywood first lost its edge more than a decade ago when many film productions lured by better tax incentives began shooting elsewhere like the Big Apple, the Big Easy and Canada. Now, TV dramas are the latest to move out. Only two of the 23 new fall dramas are being shot in Los Angeles. Big-time TV dramas, mean big-time jobs.

PAUL AUDLEY, PRESIDENT AND CEO, FILM L.A.: Typical drama -- drama, will hire 840 people.

WYNTER: Paul Audley keeps track of area production as president of Film L.A.

AUDLEY: California is way behind. If they had at the beginning of this incentives race come out of even a modest incentive that was broadly based, a lot of production could use it, it would have shut down the whole race.

WYNTER: Now, states like New York are battling for bragging rights as the new entertainment hub.

AUDLEY: We see the mayor and governor of New York claiming that in this century, they will be the center of film and television production.

WYNTER: The loss of TV drama production alone.

AUDLEY: We're down so far that where we used to own 80 percent, we're down to about 29 percent this year.

WYNTER: A decline that's draining the wallets of local production workers like Dagg along with California coffers. The solution, Dagg says, it starts at the legislative level with a push for more competitive tax incentives.

(on camera) What will this place look like if things don't turn around?

DAGG: Well, I don't think any one of us want to loss what we look ahead as the glamour of Hollywood. It's aside from the glamour, it's a nuts and bolts kinds of industry that helps sustain a lot of other -- businesses in town. I think the impact on not only Los Angeles but the state in general would be devastating.

WYNTER (voice-over): Kareen Wynter, CNN, Los Angeles.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: And CNN will be live from the red carpet this evening for the 64th prime time Emmy awards starting at 5:30 p.m. Eastern Time.

It is a hot button issue this election season. Before you even get to the ballot box, it is the battle over voter I.D. law.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Welcome back. It is time to get you ready for the week ahead. And we have our week ahead calendar here. I think it is the United Nations edition. On Tuesday, as the U.N., President Obama will be addressing the U.N. on the second day of the General Assembly. We will, of course, carry that for you live here on CNN.

And on Wednesday, we have Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, he'll be addressing the U.N. And you might remember his last time there it was pretty controversial. Delegations from the U.S. and the European nations actually walked right out.

On Thursday, we have Benjamin Netanyahu, the Israeli prime minister. He'll be speaking at the U.N. He, of course, is feeling a real sense of urgency regarding Iran's nuclear program these days. He's certainly pushing President Obama to set that red line on Iran. He has a lot of concerns related to that.

And on Thursday as well, all eyes will be on Iowa. That's where early voting begins just 40 days before the election. Both the Democrats and Republicans can actually start filling out those absentee ballots in Iowa.

And we've got much more ahead on CNN SUNDAY MORNING, which starts right now.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE (voice-over): From CNN world headquarters in Atlanta, this is CNN SUNDAY MORNING.

MICHELLE OBAMA, FIRST LADY: We cannot let anyone discourage us from casting our ballots.

KAYE: Seventy-three million eligible voters who aren't registered to vote. Now both parties are racing to get them to the polls and win them over to their side.

Only 20 years old and already a CNN hero. How one young woman has created million girl revolution.

These may be the tiniest houses you've ever seen, but they're not for show. For some, they're home.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: Good morning, everyone. I'm Randi Kaye. Thanks for starting your morning with us.

We start in the political arena. There are just 44 shopping days in the campaign season, and both candidates are trying to get your vote. (BEGIN VIDEO CLIPS)

MITT ROMNEY (R), PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: And you may not agree with me on every issue, and the American people may not agree with me on every issue, but I don't think I've ever been called anything beside as strong leader. I know how to lead. I will bring America together, I will not divide America. I will bring us together to accomplish great things for our great nation.

BARACK OBAMA, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES: We want to bring change to Washington and from the day we began this campaign but more importantly from the day I ran this office last year -- or four years ago. Seems like just last year. I've always said the change is going to take more than one term and more than one president, and it takes more than one party. It doesn't happen if you write off half the nation before you take office.

(END VIDEO CLIPS)

KAYE: Much of the attention is on the swing states, places like Ohio, 18 electoral votes. Right now President Obama has a lead there. But Mitt Romney has said that he is not worried as he puts it. One day, you're up. Then the next day you are down.

One of the challenges facing the campaigns is getting people to the polls, not just getting them enthusiastic about voting for either of the candidates but actually getting them registered. There are around 37 million Americans who are eligible to cast ballots but just aren't registered. It's become a major push for the campaigns to get them on the books.

But as our Joe Johns reports, new state laws are making it much more complicated.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

JOE JOHNS, CNN CORRESPONDENT: In the past two years, almost every state in the country has introduced or passed some type of change or restriction to the voting laws, 41 out of the 50 states since the last midterm election. We're talking about all kinds of challenges to the voting laws here, for early voting, for voter registration, absentee ballots.

And some of the most controversial changes of all are to laws requiring voters to show photo identification. Eleven states have already gotten photo ID laws in place. Another six states have photo ID laws that have now been challenged in the courts and are under review.

This is going on mostly in Republican-controlled states. We have to say here, again and again, polling shows voter ID laws are very popular. They make sense to people. Republicans who tend to support this law say they're needed to avoid voter fraud, but in previous elections and in the primaries this year, we've not seen a significant number of people charged with voter fraud. Democrats who are fighting these laws from state to state say it doesn't have anything to do with fraud. They say it's a plan to try to keep voters, especially minority voters, including blacks and Latinos away from the polls on Election Day. As you might imagine, some of the biggest battles over these laws are being waged in some of the most important battleground states, namely Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Florida, where many people think the presidential election could be decided if it's a close race.

The battle is over early voting in Ohio. The Obama campaign is fighting it out in appeals court with Ohio's Republican secretary of state over whether all voters will be allowed to go to the polls on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday before Election Day.

In Pennsylvania, we're waiting for a state judge to reconsider a ruling he made allowing a voter ID law to stay in place. The state Supreme Court told him he had to make sure there's enough time for voters to get IDs.

And in Florida, it's been a bruising battle over voting rights for the better part of the year. Democrats have won a few parts of this. Republicans have as well. Now, it's coming down to a lawsuit filed by Democratic Congresswoman Corinne Brown over how many hours polls will be open for early voting.

And why is all of this important? Well, it's about electoral votes. Ohio has 18. Pennsylvania has 20. And Florida has 29.

The candidate who wins or loses these states has a leg up in the race for the White House.

Back to you.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: Joe Johns, thank you very much.

A judge in Colorado has ruled a different kind of voter ID case. This one was meant to stop the state from putting bar codes on the ballot. The "Denver Post" reports said opponents argue that the bar codes would make each ballot traceable to the voter, but the judge ruled in favor of the bar code, saying there's absolutely no fundamental right to a secret ballot in the U.S. Constitution.

Now to Pakistan where a government official is offering a $100,000 reward for the death of the anti-Islam filmmaker. Here he is. He's the railway minister there and says he is speaking for himself when he made the offer, not as a government representative. Pakistan's prime minister condemned the bounty.

And around the world people protested against the U.S. and the anti- Islam film, "Innocence of Muslims" yesterday. There were peaceful protests like this one in Germany, and more in Nigeria, Bangladesh and Pakistan.

But in Libya, people are protesting for democracy and fighting against radical Islam. Reports say three Islamic militia bases will be closed in the wake of those protests.

Our senior international correspondent Arwa Damon is in Benghazi, Libya.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

ARWA DAMON, CNN INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENT: The events that unfolded on Friday in Benghazi most certainly, at least at this point in time, seem to be having a ripple-on effect. To begin with what happened on Friday, in the afternoon, pro-democracy demonstrators took to the streets demanding an end to the existence of armed militias, demanding that the government forces, the army and the police, be the only authority on the streets of the country.

Following that, at night, we saw hundreds of individuals storming one of the headquarters of a known militant group Ansar al-Sharia in Benghazi. After they initially managed to peacefully pretty much take over that location, they then set their sights on a second area. This, however, turned out to be a battalion that is, in fact, endorsed by the government. It did result in some clashes that caused injuries and casualties, and then the army eventually in the early morning hours of the morning, moving in, especially trying to secure massive weapons, depots that did exist there.

We arrived on sight and saw some of the heavy weaponry that the army was trying to secure. Looters, however, had managed to make off with some of the lighter weapons, ammunition, rocket-propelled grenades.

One of the brigade headquarters that is also endorsed by the government, we saw a number of detainees people said have taken into custody in conjunction with the assault on that government endorsed battalion headquarters. It certainly is a chaotic and volatile situation. Many Libyans we've been talking to in Benghazi saying that this is part of the population's being fed up with the government's inability to rein these various militias, causing people to really try to take the situation into their hands.

And we were hearing late Saturday night that two more known militant extremists Islamic bases had shut down as well, this time to the east of Benghazi, in the city of Derna. This is an area that the U.S. itself has been monitoring for quite some time due to the militant activity there, the people saying that they really want to begin seeing affirmative action from their governments. They're fed up with the impunity that militias here do tend to able to operate with. They do want to see this city -- this country moving towards the path that the revolution originally intended it for.

Arwa Damon, CNN, Benghazi, Libya.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: This morning, the leader of Libya's National Congress pledged to dissolve militias in Libya and asked people to stop carrying weapons.

To Netherlands now, where a girl's sweet 16 party was anything but sweet. This is never a good sign for a birthday party. Take a look. Police in Haren, Holland, arrested dozens at the party. It seems there were a few uninvited guests, maybe a few thousand.

You see the party invitation got posted on Facebook which sent it spiraling out of control. The family even canceled the party, but that did not stop people as you see there from showing up anyway.

And back in the U.S. -- we told you about the guy who was mauled by a tiger at the Bronx zoo in New York after he jumped into the enclosure. Well, apparently, he is telling police he wanted to be one with the tiger. Maybe that means he wanted to be in the tiger's belly. Would that make him one with the tiger? We don't know.

David Villalobos is in the hospital right now, though. He'll be arraigned on trespassing charges probably as soon as he gets out, if not sooner.

And, finally, you probably heard about that ancient piece of papyrus that referred to Jesus' wife. It's caused quite a stir. But now, a New Testament scholar says it looks to be a forgery. He admits the papyrus could be authentic, but the writing on it is a modern translation of an old Coptic language and that the message may have gotten mixed up during that translation.

Teaching girls all over the world the art of self-defense. The young lady who's doing this is only 20 years old. She's inspirational, and she's a CNN Hero and she'll join me live.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Here is something that we don't do enough of on this show. Say good morning to panama. One of our iReporters took this picture yesterday on the first day of fall off Isla Iguana on Panama's Pacific coast.

Look at that. It is simply beautiful. It certainly caught our attention. We'll be back in 90 seconds.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: One million girls strong and growing. Just Yell Fire is a nonprofit organization that combats violence against young women and teaches them how to protect themselves. The organization is educating women across 64 countries with self-defense videos and speaking engagements. And the woman behind it all is a Dallas Jessup. She's a 20-year-old who's lending her voice to help empower women everywhere.

This is what and who inspired her.

(BEGIN VIDOE CLIP)

DALLAS JESSUP, JUST YELL FIRE ERO: The idea to create Just Yell Fire came from the video footage of a girl named Carly Brucia in Florida who was walking home from a parking lot one day. A man came up to her, said something. We have no idea what. And she went away with him willingly. Four days later, she was found dead. (END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: 2007 CNN hero finalist and all-around amazing young woman. Dallas Jessup is joining us now here in studio.

Good morning.

JESSUP: Good morning.

KAYE: I remember that story. That little girl, it had a lot of impact I think on a lot of people. But for those watching who've never seen your videos, tell us about what you do and what you teach.

JESSUP: Just yell fire teaches young girls across the world self- defense and Filipino street fighting techniques so they never become a statistic or be abducted. We

KAYE: Filipino street fighting technique.

JESSUP: Eskrima is no real street fighting, eye gouging, ear tearing, groin slapping, things any girl, no matter your weight, can do to get away.

KAYE: Even young girls, I mean, even as young as Carly Brucia.

JESSUP: Right. We teach girls from 11 to 24.

KAYE: That is -- what's been the reaction? I mean, when you teach these girls, do they pick it up pretty quickly? Are they?

JESSUP: It's amazing the feedback we get from this --

I mean, even speaking in India you see girls go from shy girls to empowered. They're screaming. They're fighting. They're slapping. They're kicking. They're excited.

They're realizing that they have the ability to defend themselves and enjoy their life.

KAYE: And why is it so important to you?

JESSUP: I think it's really important because it could be anybody. I had happen to have the knowledge to get myself out of a situation and it's important to share that so the girls in my generation don't become statistics and they don't have something horrific happen in their life.

KAYE: You actually have a black belt in martial arts, and you're a street fighter. And you've had to use those skills?

JESSUP: In simulated scenarios, yes, but nothing personally has happened to me. But --

KAYE: What type of scenario?

JESSUP: Just in studios. Full-on attacks. I mean, in my taekwondo studio, we've had to deal with that and actually fend people off. So --

KAYE: Wow. That's amazing. And you have a book as well, don't you?

JESSUP: I do. It's called "Young Revolutionaries Who Rock" and it really highlights 10 young teens who are doing incredible things in the world to improve the lives and it shows you how to take what you love to do and what social justice that makes you angry and combine it to change the world.

KAYE: And what kind of reaction are you having around the world? Because clearly, you're having an impact.

JESSUP: I mean, it's really just inspiring to see kids across the world wanting to step up, take their lives into their own hands and also make a difference.

KAYE: What about the women? Have you heard from the women? Have they actually had to use some of these skills?

JESSUP: Yes. We heard from girls who had to use the techniques to get themselves out of a situation. The most common thing you here is I saw the film three months ago, I saw the film two years ago and they're still remembering the techniques years later so that these are really effective and easy to remember.

KAYE: You know, you started pretty young, making a difference in the world. Do you have advice for others, maybe some young women at home who are watching?

JESSUP: I think the biggest thing you can do is go out there and try do something. You know, you're young. You have all the time in the world. You have all these resources and people really want to help a kid making a difference. Just go out there and do something. It will work out.

KAYE: The time is now, right, when you don't have any other responsibilities.

JESSUP: Exactly. You don't have family. You don't have bills. And it's really -- resources are bountiful for you.

KAYE: Dallas, nice to see you. Thank you very much.

JESSUP: Thank you for having me.

KAYE: And for more information about Just Yell Fire, you can log on to justyellfire.com.

Living in a shoe box. OK, for most people, that's just a figure of speech, unless maybe your mouth. But some people are downsizing just that drastically. We'll tell you what they say are the advantages of these tiny houses.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Talk about downsizing, wow. I guess you could call it a new trend in housing. It's a pretty drastic form of downsizing, not just getting rid of stuff, but pretty much the house as well.

Check this out. This was sent as an iReport from Harry and Carol Brussen (ph). This is their home actually in the Blue Ridge Mountains. They say they love their 168-square-foot home, yes, 168 square feet. It's allowed them, they say, to ditch their mortgage and simplify their lives.

The Brussens also say there's plenty of space for them, their two kids, plus even a dog and a cat. Now, that is one close family. But guess what? They aren't alone.

We've got other tiny home picks and some of these homes are built on small trailers. You can take the whole thing with you. How tiny that is.

Now, these people are downsizing by choice. The Brussens as a matter of fact have their tiny home sitting on their three acres of land.

Well, it is not the same story for some people in New York. We showed you this for the first time just a couple months ago. They're called micro apartments. For some that's all they can get, 150 square feet which forces do you be creative with space or lack of space really.

What's a presidential campaign without "SNL"? We'll check out last night's twist with President Obama and Mitt Romney.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

KAYE: Just 44 days left until the president election, and the candidates aren't wasting any time getting out the message. Paul Steinhauser has look at the week ahead for President Obama and Mitt Romney.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

PAUL STEINHAUSER, CNN POLITICAL EDITOR: Mitt Romney campaigns in the Rocky Mountain battleground of Colorado tonight and tomorrow.

Our new CNN poll of polls indicates it's a close contest between the Republican nominee and President Barack Obama for the state's nine electoral votes.

On Tuesday, both Romney and the president speak separately at former President Bill Clinton's Annual Global Initiative gathering in New York City.

After that Romney heads through Ohio for a bus tour through the crucial swing state.

ROMNEY: I need Ohio to help me become the next president.

STEINHAUSER: Our poll of polls in Ohio indicates that right now, Mr. Obama has the upper hand in the race for the state's 18 electoral votes.

Both men have been frequent visitors through Ohio and while Romney rolls through the state on Wednesday, the president stumps there as well.

OBAMA: It is good to be in Ohio. It is great to be in this beautiful setting.

STEINHAUSER: Also this week, with the first presidential debate closing in, both men will continue their debate preps -- Randi.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

KAYE: Thank you, Paul.

The 2012 campaign season is gives the cast of "Saturday Night Live" plenty to talk about or make fun of. On last night's show, a twist on the candidates' gaffes. Check it out.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: While addressing a town hall meeting on Thursday, President Obama said you can't change Washington from the inside. You can only change it from the outside. A rare gaffe from the president brings us our segment "what are you doing?" I'm not saying what you said isn't true. I'm saying why are you saying anything during this Romney tailspin?

I mean, let's review. On Monday, a secret tape is released where Romney insults half of the country and on the same day he stands by those remarks. On Wednesday, he does a town hall for Hispanics in brown faced. On Friday, Paul Ryan gets booed by the AARP.

And then instead of just enjoying that, you say, hey, everybody, remember my campaign slogan? Yes, I can't do that.

Don't make this hard on yourself. You're like the criminal who gets away with murder and then starts sending the cops puzzles to figure it out.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

KAYE: That is good stuff.

CNN SUNDAY MORNING will continue at the top of hour. But first, Sanjay Gupta, M.D. begins now.