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STUDENT NEWS

President Obama Wants College Education to Be More Accessible to Lower Income Americans; Five-Year Anniversary of Miracle On the Hudson; Tracy Barnes Gives Her Place in the Olympic Team to Twin Sister

Aired January 17, 2014 - 04:00:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


CARL AZUZ, CNN ANCHOR: Fridays are awesome. Welcome to CNN STUDENT NEWS. I`m Carl Azuz. More than 80 presidents of American colleges and universities were at the White House yesterday. The reason - President Obama wants more low-income students to go to college. And he`s looking for these college leaders` help. The White House says that for families who earn some of the lowest incomes, nine percent of students get a bachelors` degree by age 25. For families earning some of the highest incomes, it`s 54 percent. The president says low-income students get less help preparing for tests and figuring out how and where to apply for college. And the U.S. government believes the best way for Americans to maximize their earning potential is to get a college degree.

That may not be true across the board, though. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, purchasing agents, people who buy machinery or equipment for businesses, can earn around $60,000 a year without a college degree. Computer network specialists who need an associate`s degree, but necessarily a bachelor`s can also earn around 60 grand. On the job training and some form of higher learning factor in the both examples.

Five years ago this week, a passenger jet took off from New York City, headed for North Carolina. It had 155 people on board. Three minutes after takeoff, it hit a flock of geese causing a loss of engine power. It landed on the Hudson River. It skidded to a stop and the plane stayed afloat in icy water, long enough for everyone on board to get off safely. Is it any wonder why this was called "The Miracle on the Hudson?"

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: A U.S. Airways plane, you see it right there, it`s in the Hudson River. It`s an Airbus A320.

CHELSEY "SULLY" SULLENBERGER, "MIRACLE ON THE HUDSON" PILOT: Five years ago this afternoon, 155 people faced sudden unexpected challenge.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: All of a sudden, the captain came on and said "Embrace for impact", and that`s when we knew we were going down.

SULLENBERGER: But landing in the Hudson only solved the first and biggest problem of the day. We then had to find a way to get 155 people out of the Hudson River to safety on a day when the air temperature was 21 degrees, the water was 38.

The first New York Waterway Ferry, we know from watching the surveillance tapes, arrived alongside Flight 1549, less than four minutes after we`d stopped in the Hudson. By the time I left the aircraft, I have to see the evacuation was complete, as the last person off the aircraft - the aircraft was surrounded by rescue vessels and the rescue of everyone aboard was well underway.

We have much to be thankful for. Much was saved that day.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: My daughter`s name is Kayleigh Elizabeth Wenslin (ph). She is in bed right now, and when I get home, I want to take my nose and put it behind her ear and a little warm body and give her best kiss from daddy because I`m alive.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Just the facts. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929. His birth name was Michael Luther King Jr. the American civil rights leader published six books. He also wrote sermons and lectures. He was the first African American to become "Time" Magazine`s Man of the Year. And in 1964 Dr. King became the youngest person at the time to win the Nobel Peace Prize. The holiday named after him falls on the third Monday in January. We`ll have more coverage after the MLK holiday on Tuesday.

We are sending out warm wishes on our "Roll Call" today because it`s going to schools in cold climates. Starting in Darby, Montana with the Tigers. They are tuned in at Darby High School. We`ll gallop just one state southeast to where the Mustangs are watching from Mount Vernon High School in Mount Vernon, South Dakota. And their geographic neighbors include the sabors (ph). Glad to have you online at Shakopee High School in Shakopee, Minnesota.

Next up, an event for Car Buffs, the Detroit auto show. It started back in 1907, showcasing 33 vehicles. The one going on now has more than 500. Auto shows allow car makers to show off. They want to make drivers want to buy their cars. They want to make the media want to cover their cars. It`s all about driving up excitement about a brand. Not everything shown here will actually go on sale, some are just concept cars. They might strut some style ideas or tout new technology. And the buzz that generates, how people respond, can give manufacturers ideas about whether to put a concept into production.

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PETER VALDES-DAPENA, CNN CORRESPONDENT: Once thing you know is covered on the Detroit auto show, there`ll be at least a few really cool concept cars. Toyota, for instance, rolled out the FT1. This is the car that could become the next Toyota Supra. It`s got the long head and the short deck, very reminiscent of that car. For now, though, you can only drive it in a videogame. It`s got no real engine.

Then there`s Kia with the GT for a steer. This is a two plus two. It means it got small back seats, powered by a 350 horse power turbocharge four cylinder engine. Then, Volkswagen, Audi and Volvo all came out with cool crossover concepts. The BW dune is a 210 horse power, BW Beatle has been jacked up, two extra inches for getting over those rough spots. The Audi (inaudible) Shooting Brake and the Volvo XC Coupe are both plug-in hybrid, concept crossovers. Volvo`s got nice 21 inch rims, while the Audi`s got two electric motors for extra performance. It can go zero to 60 in about 4.5 seconds.

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AZUZ: Twin sisters Tracy and Lanny Barnes compete in a biathlon. It`s a physically demanding sport that combines cross-country skiing with precision shooting. Last weekend they were both trying out for spots in the U.S. Olympic biathlon team. Tracy qualified, Lanny finished one spot behind her, just missing her chance to be in the Olympics. But she had a cold. She was off her game. And Tracy decided that she would bow out, give her own slot up on the team so that Lanny would be chosen for the Olympics.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Let`s just get right to it, Tracy. You make your spot. Just take us through how this idea got in your head and why you decided it was just - you had to do it.

TRACY BARNES, OLYMPIC HOPEFUL: Yes, so our Olympic trials, Lanny got sick, you know. When you are at that level, you need to be 100 percent. Otherwise, it`s not going to work out. So, you know, once I found out she was getting sick, the idea kind of started going through my head that, you know, she`s not going to make it. This would be the end for her. So, that`s when the idea kind of started that maybe I can do something to help her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: But it could also be the end for you, it could be the end of your Olympic dreams. What was - when was the moment that you decided I really need to do this, and how did you tell her?

TRACY BARNES: Yes. So, I think I decided before the last race of the Olympic trials that, you know, I had a good idea that I make the team based of my results, and so after the race, after the team was announced, you know, we went hiking in the mountains, and I, you know, I told her I`ve got something to tell you. And I told her about it. And she obviously protested.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Lanny, how hard was it to say yes? I mean this is the offer of a lifetime, but it`s almost too much to bear?

LANNY BARNES, OLYMPIC HOPEFUL: Yeah. I had hard time accepting it that, you know, she was willing to do something this amazing for me. You know, the - it`s just - it`s hard to put into words, you know. What this means to me and the fact that she`s willing to give up her dreams so that - that I can live mine.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AZUZ: In the Russian capital of Moscow, about a thousand miles north of where Lanny will be competing, the government wants subway riders to get in the Olympic spirit and in shape. You could pay 30 rubles, about a buck, for a metro ticket. Or you could do 30 squats, and CNN reporter Phil Black found out for some folks that`s easier said than done.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

PHIL BLACK, CNN CORRESPONDENT: OK. It is a bitterly cold Moscow day. What could possibly go wrong? A very popular one, I`ve noticed has been, here we go. The superman. It`s not counting. It`s also the squatting chicken. I`ve seen that a bit. That`s popular.

Pretty easy, also I thought.

59, 60.

"Esche raz," the man said, one more time.

(voice over): And knowingly, he was right.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: 29.

BLACK: No, it`s .

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That`s why you need to do it all over again.

BLACK (voice over): Everyone else seemed to be much happier with the experience. They told us they`d like to see more of the machines. And think it`s a great way to build Olympic spirit.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

AZUZ: Not to mention your quadriceps. The idea could help folks get a leg up on saving money if they don`t tend on getting injured. But of course, their hamstrings attached. This train is leaving the station. Please remember, no show on Monday. We`ll be back Tuesday after the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. Have a great weekend, you all.

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