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Bernie Sanders Wins in Oregon; Sanders Speaks to Crowd in California. Aired 11p-12a ET

Aired May 17, 2016 - 23:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


[17:30:00] WOLF BLITZER, CNN ACNHOR: Right now, a big, big crowd in California, June 7th, the primary there.

Right now, the polls have close in Oregon. Let's go get a key race alert. Right now, it's too early to call for us to make a projection in Oregon right now between Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton. But remember, this is a state where all the ballots are mail-in ballots. So they will be releasing a lot of those ballots very, very soon. We should be getting big numbers very, very soon.

We'll see what's happening in the state of Oregon. Bernie Sanders clearly wants a win in Oregon. He needs this win, especially since Hillary Clinton has won in Kentucky. The secretary of state declared him the winner, she has accepted the win. Bernie Sanders for all practical purposes has conceded defeat in Kentucky. Anderson?

ANDERSON COOPER, CNN ANCHOR: Wolf, it's the top of the hour, we're waiting to hear from Bernie Sanders. We're going to bring you those comments as soon as the senator comes out and starts to speak.

We're also joined now by Patrick Healy thanks for joining us later in the night, what are your thoughts about tonight?

PATRICK HEALY, NEW YORK TIMES POLITICAL CORRESPONDENT: You know, and this is not the May that Hillary Clinton wanted. You know, she really wanted to be pivoting more to Donald Trump and taking advantage of this very divided kind of Republican Party right now, and sort of find ways in, you know, identify vulnerabilities and start hammering home this message.

Instead, she's got to deal with Bernie Sanders going from state to state to state. It's not going to change where she ends up, I think in mid-June, in terms of having the delegates that she needs. But the message, she knows this very well. She would like six months of an unrelenting message against Donald Trump. Then, this just takes time away and kind of complicates in terms of her uniting her own party and getting sort of the younger voters, the liberals to start coming over to her.

COOPER: (Inaudible) times which you do, I mean, do you feel that the Clinton campaign, do they sense that they know how they want to run against Donald Trump, that they know how to fight back against Donald Trump? HEALY: What they haven't figured out is how to fight back against the character attacks. You know, right now she's taking this -- I'm going rise above it. I'm not going to talk about what Donald Trump's saying about me. I'm going to talk about the American people.

But within her campaign, there is a debate going on about what point do they have to engage, how hard are they going to hit back? Because right now, it just, you know, it sort of looks like, "OK. It's fine to talk about the voters but at some point, she's got to show that he's not going to get in her head and that she's going to be a fighter against Donald Trump.

COOPER: David?

DAVID AXELROD, CNN SENIOR POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: One of the things that I think Trump did so well in the primaries was the entire game was played on his opponent's side of the field. He had everybody on defense, they were always responding to him.

And it seems to me that one of the things that Hillary Clinton and her affiliated friends and supporters need to do is keep Trump on the defensive because he's not particularly good on the defensive. And that's when he makes mistakes. And I think that you're going to see a very aggressive campaign.

It is a challenge as to how much she personally engages with that and how much, you know, Trump launches all his own grenades.

COOPER: And that's one thing that Paul Begala mentioned earlier which involve, of course, (inaudible) Hillary Clinton super PAC and doesn't coordinate with Hillary Clinton's campaign directly. But you say, she can leave it up to the super PACs to go back ...

AXELROD: Yes. We're indirectly, honesty, her campaign is her problem. I've only focussed on how to contrast with Donald Trump. And we moved up our bye, we weren't planning to begin in May, but you have to be flexible in a campaign.

We saw an opening. We put them on the defensive. He spent all day tweeting hate at me and my super PAC which I love, that means a hit dog hollers.

COOPER: We got have a key race alert. Back to Wolf.

BLITZER: All right, Anderson, here's the key race alert.

Now, we told you, we'd be getting a lot of the votes counted in Oregon very quickly, mail-in ballots for weeks. Take a look at this, Bernie Sanders, early leader, 18 percent of the vote is now in only minutes after the polls have closed in Oregon.

He's got 53.8 percent Hillary Clinton 46.2 percent. You could see he's got an advantage revenue 8,818 votes right now, 61,700 for Bernie Sanders, 54,200 for Hillary Clinton. 54 percent, 46 percent had early lead. Early lead for Bernie Sanders -- in Oregon, we're -- votes very quickly. For weeks they've been mailing in their ballots. Let's take a look at the Republican side right now. We know who the presumptive nominee is. But take a look at this, 7 percent of the Republican vote now in. Donald Trump, he's the presumptive nominee, got has 61 percent. John Kasich who dropped out is a 23 percent, Ted Cruz dropped out 15 percent. Donald Trump is the big winner in Oregon. Not a surprise since he really doesn't have any other Republican opponents for now, Anderson.

COOPER: All right. Wolf, thanks very much. Again, we're waiting to hear from Senator Sanders. Let's continue the discussion we were having, I know you wanted to get on it.

VAN JONES, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: Well, I just think that, you know, Hillary Clinton, you know, a win is a win. And she did make the decision that she wanted to put a W in the column. And she did what it took.

[23:05:00] And she showed up. She talked to people. She spent money, and people responded. And so, I think you have people who think, "Oh, well, Hillary Clinton, you know, she cannot break through with these type of voters because, you know, Bernie's been doing a little bit better for these voters."

I think when she shows and she does her stuff, it can work. And honestly, if you look at where the campaign is going, I think Bernie's going to do well in California. You can see that right now. There's a tremendous enthusiasm for him in California, but does anybody think he's going to be able to get 75 percent, 80 percent of the vote in California? That's nothing does realistic.

HEALY: She wants to be in Ohio. She wants to be in Virginia, she wants to be in North Carolina. She doesn't want to be going around Kentucky day after day after day if they are going down. Puerto Rico, spending time, oh you know, how much time is so precious in these campaigns, and how to spend them. And in fact, you've got lots of time to get there.

AXELROD: The truth is this is a grind. This is not a problem with running through this. In fact, Van makes the point that this contested primary in Kentucky, all of them, have been good for Hillary even she's lost. It just made her tougher and smarter.

She's had to retool and find a way to appeal. You know, yet, it was a tight victory in Kentucky. Tighter than speed on (ph) Chris Christie, but it's a win.

(CROSSTALK)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Bernie Sanders for Marco Rubio. He'd come out tonight and declare a victory in Kentucky. It's close.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Back to earlier conversation we were having about how Hillary and Trump, how Hillary should deal with Trump. I really just don't think there any benefit to her going after him on the women stuff. She's people with poll to do that and he'll do that very effectively. I don't think he's weakness his character, actually. His weakness is that, he doesn't know a lot about politics, world affairs, domestic policy, foreign policy, the constitution, the legislative process or ....

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: whoa, whoa, whoa.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: ... what's presidents do. If I were Hillary, one way for her to really go after him without getting her hands too dirty, is to just constantly attack him on what he doesn't know.

(CROSSTALK)

COOPER: I want Jeff to weigh in on that.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Let me finish, while allowing Paul and her surrogates to do the character attack.

LORD: Very quickly, he's not a member of the political class.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: That's evident.

LORD: Well, yes, right, but that's an asset. That's exactly what people do not want is somebody who is part ...

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Who knows anything.

LORD: No, no, who is so plugged in and can recite all of these things. Sort of they want somebody who was not part of that culturally and politically. That's an asset.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: But ideally, who knows a little bit about the constitution, a little bit about the legislative process.

LORD: But he doesn't express it in political class language.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: OK.

LORD: How about that?

(CROSSTALK)

COOPER: Let's look at the numbers in Oregon, John King at the (inaudible) ball to breakdown for us, John?

JOHN KING, CNN CHIEF NAITONAL CORRESPONDENT: Anderson, we're just watching the votes coming quickly because of the mail ballots in Oregon. 29 percent of the vote count already. You see Senator Sanders here, 57.8 percent and 42.2 percent for Secretary Clinton. You see as the map goes in.

So far there's one county here in the middle, relatively small country, Jefferson County that Secretary Clinton is ahead. But the rest of the map filling in for Senator Sanders so far, he's winning up here. Let's just check up in here. In the Portland area up here, he's winning by a healthy margin. The issue is, we're early. 34 percent in this county, Senator Sanders getting 97 percent of the vote, he likes that up there with Salem area is, Eugene down here, (inaudible) area, 57 percent of the vote there.

Here's the issue for Senator Sanders, again, early vote count suggests he's on his path to a convincing victory in the state of Oregon. The issue is to catch up in the delegate map. Believe it or not, that's a tamping. That would be show lacking if those numbers hold up. It's not a big enough margin to actually keep alive his hope of passing Hillary Clinton in the pledged delegate count. We will keep counting here.

One quick footnote on the Republican side, you know, Governor Kasich, Senator Cruz obviously have suspended their campaigns. There are no active candidates other than Donald Trump.

The only significance of this is, by Oregon Republican party rules for every 4 percent of the vote, you get a delegate in Oregon. That doesn't make much of a difference in the long run. What it will do in the end, is just delay a little bit longer. Donald Trump getting to the official 1,287 it takes to Clench, 1,287 so Kasich and Cruz are likely to pick up some delegates in Oregon tonight, it just delays probably until June 7th, Donald Trump officially getting over the top, Wolf.

BLITZER: All right. John, as expected by the way, Donald Trump is the winner in Oregon. He's the presumptive Republican nominee. He is the winner in Oregon.

Yes, other names were on the ballot over there, but Trump wins fully expected. He's the only Republican presidential candidate left standing right now, so he's the winner in Oregon, Anderson?

COOPER: All right, Wold again, we're waiting for Senator Sanders score. You want to talk ...

GLORIA BORGER, CNN CHIEF POLITICAL ANALYST: Yes. I just to want go back to the discussion we were having about how Hillary Clinton takes on or doesn't take on Donald Trump. You know, what her campaign has been doing is studying the failures of the other Republicans who all tried in various ways to take on Donald Trump, and it didn't work.

[23:10:00] And a lot of them did it by trying to be Donald Trump, by trying to out trump Trump. And you can't do that because he is who he is, and that is not who Hillary is.

And so, I think that there obviously no decisions are made and this is an evolving kind of decision, but she plays her game. And Paul's groups play their game and her surrogates may play another game. The question is, as we were talking about earlier tonight, when she gets on this debate stage, she is going to have to have answers because he will attack her directly and personally, and will attack her husband.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: That's right. I'm sorry. UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Yes, you'll have to have answers too. And you can see her in some of these campaign appearance that she sorts of saying, this is what it would look like on a debate stage, what would his plan for creating jobs actually be?

(CROSSTALK)

NIA-MALIKA HENDERSON, CNN SENIOR POLITICAL REPORTER: Yes. And I also think, I mean, it's kind of (political) argument that she made against Sanders, which was that he had a good diagnosis, but he didn't know how to fix the problems.

So I think you'll see some of that, you know, what we'll see is, arguing that she can make the same argument against Trump.

HEALY: I talk to Donald Trump a couple days ago for the story about how he plans to go after her character. And he was sort of rehearsing these lines during the interview. He said, "Mrs. Clinton, what about when you call the Monica Lewinsky a narcissistic loony tune or what about according to George Stephanopoulos who said we have to destroy the story of Connie Hamzy, you know, during the first Bill Clinton race.

What are you going to say to that? How can say that you stand up and you're going to fight for women and you're sincere in that when you have this history. And the reality is, is that they don't have an answer to that yet. They, first of all, they think that that will be so offensive to voters. If he goes after her on national television and he'll be a huge reaction, but I'm not sure about that if he really -- if he nails, if he goes I think ...

AXELROD: I think having been involved in a lot of debate preparation. I have to say, this is going to be the most complicated debate prep maybe ever back in 2008. You know, we brought in Governor Grant home to play Sarah Palin in the debate prep with Joe Biden. And she really inhabited the character.

And it was really important because Biden got a sense of what have he was going to be facing on that stage, and how he was going to deal with it. They need to find somebody who plays Donald Trump in that debate prep so that she can fully understand what it's going to be like on that stage.

COOPER: So she has not faced somebody like Donald Trump on that debate?

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: No.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nobody has.

(CROSSTALK)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Someone like Hillary Clinton, there's this myth at that the press has. That somehow Trump is kyrptonite of whoever is Superman, right? He's nothing -- everything bounces off of him when you have Republican primaries filled with angry old white men. When you run in America, he ain't kyrptonite.

COOPER: We're seeing Jane Sanders and Senator Sanders taking the stage. Let's listen in.

(BEGIN VIDEO TAPE)

SEN. BERNIE SANDERS, (I-VT) DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: Thank you. Thank you, Carson.

Let me begin by thanking all of you, what a fantastic turnout. Thank you so much.

And let me thank Jim Sobel (ph) and Nick Sanal (ph) and Francis Fisher and Thomas Longwear (ph), Adriana Abalao (ph), Gill Sadelio (ph), Kendrick Sampson (ph) and let me give a special thanks to a very good friend of mine and one of the great actors in our country, Danny Glover.

Danny is not only an extraordinary actor, but as many you know, he has spent his entire adult life fighting for economic, social justice, racial justice. Danny, thank you for all that you've done.

[23:15:00] Let me also take this opportunity to say a word of thanks to the people of Kentucky. In a closed primary, something I am not all that enthusiastic about where in independents are not allowed to vote, where secretary Clinton defeated Barack Obama by 250,000 votes in 2008. It appears tonight that we're going to end up with about half of the delegates from Kentucky.

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKERS (in unison): Bernie, Bernie, Bernie, Bernie.

SANDERS: I want to thank you all for coming out because this is in a sense is the beginning of the final push to win California. When we -- and by the way, I should tell you, that there are a lot of people out there, many of the pundits and politicians, they say, Bernie Sanders should drop out. The people of California should not have the right to determine who the next president will be.

Well, let me be as clear as I can be. I agree with you, we are in until the last ballot is cast.

You know, when we began this campaign a little over a year ago, we were 60 points behind Secretary Clinton in the polls. We had no political organization, no money, very little name recognition. The media and the pundits determined that we were a fringe candidacy. And nobody, nobody thought that this campaign was going anywhere, and on top of all of that, we were taking on the most powerful political organization in the country an organization that elected Bill Clinton twice and ran a strong campaign for Hillary Clinton in 2008.

Well, a lot has changed in the last year. As of today, we have won 19 state primaries and caucuses, and over 9 million votes. No one can predict the future, but I think we have a real shot to win primaries in a number of the states that will be coming up. And don't tell Secretary Clinton she might get nervous. I think we're going to win here in California. And all of you know ...

UNIDENTIFIED SPEAKERS (in unison): Bernie, Bernie, Bernie, Bernie.

SANDERS: And if all of you know California has 475 pledged delegated. And let me mention something else, I am especially proud that in, I believe, every primary and caucus, those we won and those we lost. We have received a significant majority of the votes of young people.

[23:20:01] And by the way, you know, one of the things about getting older, the older you get, you know -- well, yeah. People who are older appear to be younger that's what it is. So we are winning people 45 years of age or younger, and what that tells me is that our vision, a vision of social justice, economic justice, racial justice and environmental justice, that is the future of this country.

As of today, I am proud to tell you that taking on virtually the entire Democratic establishment almost all of the senators, the members of the House, mayors, governors, we have won over 45 percent of the pledged delegates. And in a couple of weeks, if we can win big in New Jersey, New Mexico, North and South Dakota, Montana, California, we have the possibility.

It will be a steep climb, I recognize that, but we have the possibility of going to Philadelphia with a majority of the pledged delegates.

Now, some people say that we've got a steep hill to climb to do that, and that is absolutely true. But you know what, together, we have been climbing that steep hill from day one in this campaign. And we are going to continue to fight for every last vote until June 14th, and then we're going to take our fight into the convention.

You know, there is a lot of discussion about the role of super PACs. And I am very proud to tell you that I am the only candidate running for president who does not have a super PAC. We made a decision when we began this campaign that we were not going to beg Wall Street or Corporate America or billionaires a campaign contribution.

And as of today, without a super PAC, we have received almost eight million individual campaign contributions. Anybody know what that average contribution is? That's right, $27. And what that shows the world at a time when big money is dominating our political process that you can run a strong winning national campaign without begging billionaires for campaign contributions.

Let me also mention something that a lot of people may not be aware of. And that is that virtually every national and state poll taken in the last six weeks in all of those polls, we are defeating Donald Trump.

[23:25:08] And not only are we defeating Trump in most cases by double digits in almost every case. In almost every case whether it is a national poll or a state poll, we do much better against Trump than does Secretary Clinton. A poll just came out, I think it was yesterday, the state of Georgia, not a very good state for us, Trump was beating Secretary Clinton by 4 points. We were beating him by 5 points.

If the Democratic Party wants to be certain that Donald Trump is defeated, and that we must do. We, together are the campaign to do that. And it is not just the polls, polls go up, polls go down, what it is, is that our campaign has the energy and the enthusiasm and the grassroots capability to make certain that in November, in the general election, we have a huge voter turnout.

Here is a political truism, when the voter turnout is low and people are demoralized and don't come out to vote reason Republicans win. When there is excitement and energy and people are prepared to stand up and fight back progressives and Democrats win that is our vision.

I don't have to explain to anybody here that the American people will not elect a candidate like Donald Trump who insults Mexicans and Latinos, who insults Muslims, who insults women and veterans, and who is a leader of the so-called birther movement, trying to delegitimize the presidency of our first African American president. We will not accept as president a man who wants to give hundreds of billions of dollars in tax breaks to billionaire families like his. But who has told us that we don't have to worry about raising the starvation minimum wage of $7.25 an hour. We will not accept a president who recklessly talks about using nuclear weapons and who changes his mind every day on every issue.

Let me also say a word to the leadership of the Democratic Party. And that is that the Democratic Party is going to have to make a very, very profound and important decision. It can do the right thing and open its doors and welcome into the party. People who are prepared to fight for real economic and social change.

[23:30:01] That is the Democratic Party I want to see. Bringing in people who are willing to take on Wall Street, that take on corporate greed and to take on a fossil fuel industry which is destroying this planet.

So I say to the leadership of the Democratic Party, open the doors, let the people in or the other option, the other option for the Democratic Party which I see as a very sad and tragic option is to, is to choose to maintain its status quo structure, remain dependent on big money, campaign contributions and be a party with limited participation and limited energy.

And a party which incredibly is allowing a rightwing extremist Republican Party to capture the votes of a majority of working people in this country. Now I come from the working class of this country, and I will be damned. I will be damned if we will allow the Republican Party, whose job is to represent the rich and the powerful to win the votes of working class Americans.

Now, let me say a word about why I think this campaign is doing so well and you know why, because we are doing something very unusual, we are telling the American people the truth. And here is a very important truth. If we as a nation do not get our act together, this great nation is going to slip into an oligarchy form of society where a handful of billionaires control our political and economic life.

Let me tell you how absurd it is, just announced the other day, the Koch Brothers, second wealthiest family in America, a family worth tens of billions of dollars, extremely rightwing are contributing over $40 million to try to make the United States Senate stay Republican, $40 million.

And here is what is even crazier. A guy named Sheldon Adelson, also one of the wealthiest people in America. This is a billionaire who is prepared to contribute huge sums of money to another billionaire named Donald Trump.

The American people are sick and tired of billionaires running our economy and our political life. Together, we are going to overturn this disastrous Citizens United Supreme Court decision and we're going to move toward public funding of elections. I want this country to be a vibrant democracy.

[23:35:02] And that means whether you are progressive, conservative, moderate, if you want to run for office, you should not have to beg millionaires for campaign contributions.

I want this country to have one of the highest voting turnout rates in the world, not one of the lowest. But before, before we will have the opportunity to defeat Donald Trump, we're going to have to defeat Secretary Clinton.

A campaign is about issues and ideas and let me very briefly and straightforwardly tell you some of the differences between Secretary Clinton and myself. Number one, I am proud to tell you I don't have a Super PAC, and I don't get money from Wall Street and other (inaudible).

Secretary Clinton has a number of Super PACs and in the last filing period, reported receiving a $15 million from Wall Street. Our job is to take on Wall Street, not to take their money.

Federal minimum wage of $7.25 is a starvation wage. Secretary Clinton wants to raise that to $12 an hour, that's OK, but it is not good enough. Hold that sign up. Let everybody see it. We're talking about a fight for $15 an hour.

And I'm proud to tell you, I am proud to tell you I have been on the picket line with those workers, they are standing up and fighting for a living wage and all of us will stand with them.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

BLITZER: So breakaway for a second, Bernie Sanders, we project is the winner of the Oregon Democratic Presidential Primary. Let's go back to the speech.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

SANDERS: CNN has called Oregon for Bernie Sanders. We won. You know, we won a great victory in the state of Washington a few months ago. We just won Oregon and we're going to win California. I am beginning to like the West Coast.

This campaign, when we talk about equitable wages, it is not just as you know raising the minimum wage to a living wage. It is also ending the disgrace of women making 79 cents on the dollar of (inaudible). And together I know that every man here will stand with the women in the fight for pay equity.

[23:40:08] I am a member of the U.S. Senate Committee on the Environments. And I will tell you what all of you know and that is that climate change is real. It is caused by human activity, and as everybody in California knows it is already causing devastating problem.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

COOPER: Well, listening to Senator Sanders speaking in California this evening. Let's get some quick takes from our panel. David Axelrod?

AXELROD: Well, I wouldn't exactly say the planes are coming in for a landing here.

BORGER: Right.

AXELROD: If anything, I think he intensified his rhetoric and he said flat out to beat Donald Trump, we first have to beat Secretary Clinton, but there's nothing that happened tonight that would suggest he's going to be in that position.

So the question becomes if his goal is to defeat Donald Trump, how does he land the plane in such a way that he isn't giving a sense of illegitimacy to his supporters about the whole process.

BORGER: Yeah.

JEFFREY LORD, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: You know, there's a line from the 1986 movie "The Fly," "Be afraid, be very afraid." If I were Debbie Wasserman Schultz running this convention, if I were the Clinton folks, I would be concerned.

BORGER: Well, I think at some point ...

COOPER: Do you think she's switch -- do you think if there was a remake of an original "Fly," but I'm the fly (ph), it doesn't matter.

LORD: It was.

COOPER: That was Jeff Golden (ph), anyway ...

LORD: Yes, but that's will not ...

(CROSSTALK)

COOPER: OK.

BORGER: We kind of put the Democratic Party on notice. He said, "Look, you've got to open your doors. You have to start telling the American people the truth."

And you know, he went on and on about that, and I think that in talking about his strategies, I mean he went to list of states everywhere from New Jersey, Montana, whatever to getting to California, but didn't mention that he would have to win, you know, 70 percent plus ...

HENDERSON: Yeah.

(CROSSTALK)

HENDERSON: I mean that, you know, in some ways I think he's misreading the Democratic Party. I mean, that this Democratic Party is the Democratic Party that elected in Obama in 2008 and 2012 and welcomed millions of new voters, the surge voters which Obama helped bring into the party.

And in this idea that somehow the Democratic Party is standing in Bernie Sanders way, just -- it's not a real argument. Like, he is down 3 million voters to Hillary Clinton and those voters aren't somehow tons of the Democratic Party who've been bamboozled into voting for Hillary Clinton.

HEALY: I think Bernie Sanders is pretty happy, you know, in terms of his back to where he wanted to be. He's back to fighting.

The last few weeks there's been a lot of back and forth in his camp about whether he's going to start being nicer to Hillary, if his tone was going to change, what he was going to talk about.

At this point, he wants to go to California and just have these big rallies after big rallies and he's going to take it to her. He seems determined. And I think when I would say he is determined to keep going.

BORGER: I think there's still a lot of discussion and that contain (ph) about that though, right? I mean ...

HEALY: I think they want to go to California, certainly, and pull in the sort of big crowds in which he's giving them, you know, pretty much kind of liberal red meat I think to run up those delegate numbers at least ...

(CROSSTALK)

S.E. CUPP, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: He definitely double down on the party rhetoric, you know. I mean, he really made the party an enemy ...

BORGER: Yeah. CUPP: ... in this speech. And as we discussed earlier we wondered, OK, how is he going to deal with the back that coming out of this Nevada incident with Debbie Wasserman Schultz just, you know, an hour ago stating some pretty heated things, what was he going to do in the rally? Clearly, I don't think he plan to change cursor or change rhetoric.

COOPER: We get another projection to make. Let's go to Wolf.

BLITZER: All right, we can now officially project that Hillary Clinton is the winner in Kentucky based on the latest information. We just got a call from the Secretary of State's Office in Kentucky.

All the precincts have now reported by their count, Hillary Clinton is the winner by 1,923 votes in the states of Kentucky. As a result of that, CNN projects Hillary Clinton is the winner in Kentucky.

Earlier, we heard directly from the Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes think she's the unofficial winner, but now apparently according to the Secretary of State's Office in Kentucky, its official, Hillary Clinton is the winner in Kentucky.

And you just heard a few minutes ago, CNN projecting that Bernie Sanders is projected to win in Oregon, a big win for him in Oregon tonight, an important win for Hillary Clinton in Kentucky tonight.

Let's take a quick break. Full analysis and a whole lot more right after this.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

[23:49:35] BLITZER: All right, let's recap. Bernie Sanders, we have projected he is the winner in Oregon. Take a look at the 66 of the vote is now in.

He's got 53 percent, Hillary Clinton is 47 percent, more than 400,000 people voted in the Democratic Presidential Primary in Oregon.

Bernie Sanders right now has a lead of more than 25,000. CNN projects he is the winner in Oregon, a very important impressive win for Bernie Sanders in Oregon.

In Kentucky, a different story, take a look at this.

[23:50:03] CNN projects Hillary Clinton is the winner, but look at how close it is, 99 percent of the vote has been counted. 46.8 percent for Hillary Clinton, 46.3 percent for Bernie Sanders. Once again, more than 420,000 people voted in Kentucky.

She wins so far by 1,923 votes. Hillary Clinton is the winner in Kentucky. She needed this win to show that she could at least derail some of the momentum that Bernie Sanders was on, important win for Hillary Clinton in Kentucky.

They split the delegates and relatively in both states because that's the way the Democrats divide delegates proportionately. Anderson. COOPER: Let's continue talk about what we hear from Senator Sanders (inaudible) tonight. Paul, were you surprised by the tone?

PAUL BEGALA, CNN POLITICAL COMMENTATOR: I was. I was surprised first that he went after Hillary Clinton the way he did. I understand he's mad at the Democratic Party. I don't know that that was the time and the place to do it, but point that did he take after Hillary.

You know, I've been very publicly counseling turn your guns on Trump, make Donald Trump by the two front or he had great stuff going after Trump. But I don't think anybody's going to cover that or should they because the fight within the family.

The thing that bothered me the most is this, he is telling his voters he can win and he can't.

BORGER: Right.

HEALY: Right.

BEGALA: And when he loses, and he will, he is feeding a narrative that somehow they rubbed (ph). They weren't rubbed. This is democracy. She has 3 million more votes.

She's won more votes, more states, more pledged delegates, more superdelegates. If there was another category of puppies and unicorns, she may win that.

He's running a great campaign, but he needs to not mislead his voters because they take this seriously. They really think that they're going to win.

COOPER: You're saying he's misleading his voters?

BEGALA: Yes, he is.

BORGER: Yeah.

COOPER: Van, is he misleading voters?

JONES: Look, I wish that he was doing more to prepare his movement to make this turn. And I think that he is -- I think that it is wrong for him not to do a better job preparing folks.

I also think that I don't think people understand the movement that he is a part of that he is leading. Sometimes they did understand it, but you have a bunch of people out there. You say well, 3 million more, that's true, 3 million is a lot. But he does have 45 percent of all the earned delegates. That is a big, big number.

And also that the passions of the people that he is trying to speak for, if he weren't speaking for them, we would be worse off because those voices would be out there with no focal point.

I don't -- there's a level of pain out there that he is speaking to that does not want to hear that, you know, that the math on the magic wall says this set the other thing. What they want to hear is that somebody is listening.

And tonight, I think the establishment Democrats must not (inaudible). There had been no signal from the establishment Democrats that anything that happened in Nevada was wrong, except for Bernie's people. And that I think is -- was a huge missed opportunity because there were things that were wrong.

HEALY: I think you're right about the math and it goes to large report. This is the kind of speech that he could have given on the night that he won the New Hampshire primary.

This is the kind of speech where you're trying to rally the troops for the next primary, the next week, the next month, you know, the next debate, get excited, goose the fundraising and look forward to, you know, what kind of a message you can build on.

You know, instead it seems like he's got basically a few weeks left and he's making a decision to just fight as hard as he can, I think to win California. I think he wants sort of a big symbolic, you know, wind to be able to take into the convention to sort of end this race with.

But it's going to leave the party it seems just so deeply divided and like Paul said, all of these supporters who are going to go into that convention and still like ...

JONES: I want him to do more, but I also want the establishment Democrats to do more and I get beat up on Twitter from both sides because I honestly believe that Bernie Sanders has the responsibility to his movement whether they follow him or not, to begin to prepare them for the turn because the reality is there will be in a situation where they have to make the turn to ...

CUPP: You're right. He is saying, you know, you need to be heard. The problem is he saying, "I'm the only one that can do that." And when he's not the last guy standing and Hillary Clinton is, where's the (inaudible)? Where's the movement though? Where does the passion go?

BEGALA: Both Hillary Clinton and their campaign manager put out a statement tonight. Hillary did not give a speech, missed opportunity. I think she should have, but she didn't. She did put out a statement calling for unity.

Robby Mook, the campaign manager has been going hard against Sanders to the way he put out a statement very different from the interview we have with Jeffrey Weaver air tonight, the Sanders campaign manager.

Robby Mook statement, the Hillary campaign manager says, "Supporters of both Clinton and Sanders deserve respect for the work they've put into their campaign. Ultimately, we're confident that the passion and energy from the primary will be united in a common purpose, to move forward the ideals of our party and keep the White House out of Donald Trump's hands." That what the ...

(CROSSTALK) BEGALA: It did come from her. No, no, I mean, she said much of the same thing in her own.

COOPER: We've got to take a quick break. We'll have more ahead, we'll be right back.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

[23:59:38] BLITZER: Bernie Sanders has an impressive win in Oregon. Hillary Clinton wins in Kentucky, but by a very, very narrow margin. The Democrats clearly still divided.

We're going to continue or election coverage right now with Don Lemon in New York.

DON LEMON, CNN ANCHOR: What an exciting night. Thank you very much, Wolf Blitzer. It is midnight here on the East Coast. This is a Special "CNN TONIGHT", I'm Don Lemon.

Our breaking news tonight, a racer (ph) thin victory for Hillary Clinton in Kentucky and in Oregon, a win for Bernie Sanders. His supporters cheering their man on tonight.