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House Debates Ahead of Trump Impeachment Vote. Aired 10-10:30a ET

Aired January 13, 2021 - 10:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


REP. JASON SMITH (R-MO): Never happened in the people's house.

[10:00:02]

For the first time, can the House Democrats and speaker of the House put the people before politics? Please put the people before politics. At a time when our nation is more divided than ever before, let's put people before politics.

President Trump will be leaving in seven days. Let's try to heal this nation. Let's listen to the American people. This is the people's house. Let's operate for the people. This country is hurting. The people are hurting. Our colleagues are hurting. This is a reckless impeachment. This will only bring up the hate and fire more than ever before. Have a conscience. Put the people before politics.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman's time has expired. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized. The gentleman from Oklahoma reserves. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized.

REP. JIM MCGOVERN (D-MA): Mr. Speaker, let me remind all of my colleagues that what happened on Wednesday would not have happened if it weren't for the occupant in the White House. And if we want to put the people first, we ought to vote to impeach him and remove him from office as soon as possible.

With that, I yield one minute to the gentlewoman from California, Ms. Brownley.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman from California is recognize for one minute.

REP. JULIA BROWNLEY (D-CA): Mr. Speaker, today is a defining moment in our history. Congress was attacked by a mob directed by the president of the United States. It was a horrible, terrifying situation. But we all know deep in our hearts that it could have been much, much worse. We simply cannot let it stand. We cannot let it stand for the very soul of our democracy. We cannot let the president of the United States leave office without acting. We are the oldest constitutional republic in the world and our Capitol is the sacred symbol of our great democracy.

To my colleagues across the aisle, I appeal to your sense of service and duty to our nation and to the oath we all swore to uphold. Before we are Democrats and Republicans, we are Americans. Let us come together to fulfill our oath by voting for the resolution before us and by defending, preserving and honoring our democracy.

I yield back.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman yields. The gentleman from Massachusetts reserves. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.

REP. TOM COLE (R-OK): Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I yield two minutes to one of our new members, distinguished gentle lady from South Carolina, Ms. Mace. Note that this is her first speech on the House floor.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman from South Carolina is recognized for two minutes.

REP. NANCY MACE (R-SC): Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And this is not the reason why I wanted to give my first speech in our chambers, in our hallowed halls. This is not what I wanted to do in my first week in office. But after the violent events of last week, watching and witnessing how heartbreaking this was, thank God I sent my kids home on Monday morning because I was worried about the rhetoric, the violence leading up to the events into the rally on January 6th, the violence that could transpire. Not only were our lives in danger, but if my kids were here, their lives would have been in danger too, the two most precious people in my life.

Mr. Speaker, the president of the United States, the U.S. House of Representatives has every right to impeach the president of the United States. But what we're doing today, rushing this impeachment in an hour or two-hour long debate on the floor of this chamber, bypassing judiciary poses great questions about the constitutionality of this process.

I believe we need to hold the president accountable. I hold him accountable for the events that transpired, for the attack on our Capitol last Wednesday. I also believe that we need to hold accountable every single person, even members of Congress, if they contributed to the violence that transpired here. But today I'm asking my colleagues to remember the words of the legendary, the great leader in this country, Dr. Martin Luther King, who once said the time is always right to do what is right.

And if we're serious about healing the divisions in this country, Republicans and Democrats need to acknowledge this is not the first day of violence we've seen. We've seen violence across our country for the last nine months. And we need to recognize, number one, that our words have consequences, that there is violence on both sides of the aisle. We've contributed to it. We need to take responsibility for our words and our actions. We need to acknowledge there is a problem, take responsibility for it and stop being part of the problem and start being part of the solution.

[10:05:01]

God bless every member in the chamber today and God bless the United States of America. Thank you.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman yields. The gentleman from Oklahoma reserves. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized.

MCGOVERN: Mr. Speaker, I'm happy to yield one minute to the gentleman from Vermont, Mr. Welch.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Vermont is recognized for one minute.

REP. PETER WELCH (D-VT): Mr. Speaker, our government is founded on the principles, all power flows from the people. Donald trump challenged this principle in two ways, deceit and violence. The deceit is repeated in baseless assertions of an electoral fraud, the violence, the attack on the United States Capitol on January 6. The mob was assembled by Donald Trump, incited by Donald Trump, and in service of Donald Trump's effort to overturn, through violence, what he lost at the voting booth.

The violent mob reached the Capitol, killed and injured capitol police, damaged property, threatened the vice president, members of Congress and staff, all to obstruct the peaceful transfer of power. If we want unity, we must have accountability. So the question before this Congress, will Congress condone, through acquiescence or condemn through impeachment, Donald Trump's violent acts to overturn the election?

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman's time has expired.

WELCH: The Congress must impeach. I yield back.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Massachusetts reserves. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.

COLE: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I yield two minutes to distinguished Republican leader of the Judiciary Committee, Mr. Jordan Ohio.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Ohio is recognize for two minutes.

REP. JIM JORDAN (R-OH): I thank the gentleman for yielding.

ANDERSON COOPER, CNN ANCHOR: I'm Anderson Cooper alongside Erin Burnett. You've been watching history unfold as President Trump is set to become the only American president to be impeached twice.

The House Rules Committee is setting the parameters for the unprecedented action the House has undertaken today. The debate will start shortly in the very chamber of that just one week ago was the scene of a horrific act.

ERIN BURNETT, CNN ANCHOR: Domestic terrorists, of course, attacked the Capitol. It was an attempted coup. They broke down doors, they ransacked offices, attacking Capitol police officers, one of whom was beaten to death. We're told there was hand to hand combat, military preparations.

The president's rhetoric incited the mob before the insurrection along, of course, with his refusal to accept the results of the election. And that, let's make no mistake, that refusal and that big lie, Anderson, is why we are all here today.

COOPER: As House Democrats look to hold the president accountable, more and more Republicans, both in the House and the Senate, are abandoning Trump in his final days in power.

Let's go to CNN's Manu Raju to walk everyone through what has been happening. Manu?

MANU RAJU, CNN SENIOR CONGRESSIONAL CORRESPONDENT: Yes. They're just beginning this historic debate, making Donald Trump the only president in history who will be impeached twice. This is going to be different than 2019 because we expect Republicans to be on board, not a lot of Republicans but at least a handful, maybe up to 10, maybe up to 12, up to 15. The White House seems to think 20, but the expectation on Capitol Hill is perhaps 10 to maybe 12.

Because one reason why is Republican leaders are not pressuring their members to fall in line to support the president on this, many republicans are concerned, distressed, some outright disgusted by the president's comments last week, inciting this deadly mob that came to Capitol Hill, killed five people, including one Capitol police officer. This article of impeachment is the incitement of an insurrection, charging the president with a high crime and misdemeanor and saying he needs to be removed from office immediately because of this.

Now, this comes, of course, after he was charged with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress in 2019. The difference here also, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is having a much different view of this charge versus 2019. I am told from multiple sources that he believes impeachment is the way to drive Donald Trump and Trumpism out of the Republican Party.

He is frustrated, disgusted, angry at the president's role on Wednesday, also frustrated that the president essentially costing them the Senate majority. They will be in the minority come January 20th. The question is when exactly that Senate trial will begin and whether or not there will be 17 Republicans ultimately that would vote to break ranks and convict this president and send him essentially -- prevent him ever from holding office ever again.

McConnell has not said if he will support convicting the president. He has not said that privately or publicly yet. But he's indicating he very well could.

Now, also the question is how quickly will the democrats, once this impeachment happens, send over that article of impeachment over to the Senate that will begin the Senate trial. We expect it to be sent overall most immediately, according to House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer. The question will be whether the Senate will come back early, try to convict President Trump before he leaves office next week. Unlikely that will happen. Most likely, the trial will happen at the beginning of the Biden presidency.

[10:10:00]

But at the moment right now, we're seeing this key, historic first step dealing with procedural matters first before they go to the historic vote making Donald Trump the only president to be impeached twice which will happen by later this afternoon, guys.

COOPER: Yes, Manu, I appreciate the update.

Joining me now is CNN Political Director David Chalian.

David, just walk us through what's happened so far today and kind of what we expect to see for the rest of the day.

DAVID CHALIAN, CNN POLITICAL DIRECTOR: Well, as Manu was saying, we're now in the procedural sort of the process phase, the sausage getting made here of how impeachment will come to be. So they are debating now the rule that will govern how the debate proceeds here.

But what we've seen politically, Anderson, is something we haven't seen before, and that is this earth shifting beneath the Republican Party right now. And we shouldn't overdo what this breakaway from the president is. The vast majority of Republicans are going to side with the president. Public polling showing that 70 percent of the Republican Party still totally with the president, doesn't think he should be removed.

But it is so consequential to see Liz Cheney, the number three House Republican, to see Mitch McConnell say what he said, because that is unlike what we've seen before. So, for five and a half years, we've asked what will it take, what does Donald Trump have to do to have some breaking away?

And, again, it's just a piece of it right now, but it is the beginning of the Republican Party internally struggling to figure out the path of what they're going to be in a post-Trump era. And it took a riotous, deadly insurrection that the president of the United States incited last Wednesday to actually get to this point for them.

COOPER: Laura Coates, Senior Legal Analyst, former federal prosecutor, does the fact that there's at least some bipartisan support for this impeachment strengthen its impact? I mean, does it make it more significant than the president's first impeachment?

LAURA COATES, CNN SENIOR LEGAL ANALYST: It certainly does, because this is really more of a direct line from the conduct and statements of the president of the United States directly to what happened. You don't have to meander or go around Robin's bend trying to understand Latin terminology, like quid pro quo, et cetera. You actually understand what's going on.

And so you have more support because the evidentiary reelings here, the idea of the predicate being what do you see here that day, what took place, what did you see and what do you know. And the president's own comments afterwards have done him no great service in trying to gain more support among Republicans who were with him the last time around.

This really is indicative, Anderson, of the fact that the people who were the witnesses are the people who are the deciders of his fate. And he has shown no contrition, and I think it will not serve him well here.

COOPER: Ross Garber, you're an impeachment law professor at Tulane University and CNN Legal Analyst. It would take, I believe, what, 17 Republicans in the Senate to actually convict. Is it automatic then that Donald Trump would not be able to run for federal office again or would that be a separate vote?

ROSS GARBER, CNN LEGAL ANALYST: Yes. So the way it works -- and it's rare. So there is this disqualification provision in the impeachment provisions of the Constitution that permit the Senate to order disqualification if they vote to convict.

So, the way it works -- and I think it's only been used about three times before, so it's rare. So the way it works is there's a vote to convict or not to convict. That takes two-thirds. Then after that, then the Senate considers whether to disqualify the president from holding office in the future. That historically has taken only a majority vote, but that would come after the vote to convict.

COOPER: Carrie Cordero, you're a CNN Legal Analyst. This whole process, I mean, it's happening obviously very fast. The attacks at the Capitol was just one week ago. Does the speed at which this is playing out, does that concern you at all?

CARRIE CORDERO, CNN LEGAL ANALYST: No. I think given the circumstances, the speed is appropriate. There's a real urgency to these proceedings from a security perspective and from a perspective of the integrity of the functioning of our government and the integrity of our democracy.

One of the things that the House Judiciary Committee report outlined last night was that the president not only incited the activity that took place on January 6th, but the report details that throughout the day of the attack on the Capitol. The president continued actions and phone calls and efforts to try to prevent the certification of the election, to prevent Congress from doing its constitutional duty and to really try to influence and threaten the vice president from doing his constitutional duty.

So this was not only an attack on the Capitol but an attack on the functioning of our democracy itself. And so I think that the House's urgency in doing this is appropriate, and I really think the Senate leadership needs to consider the urgency of their action assuming the House votes to impeach.

[10:15:00]

COOPER: I want to go back to the house floor and listen more to the debate.

MCGOVERN: -- what happened on Wednesday, when his words launched a violent attack against this Capitol where five people lost their lives and many more were injured. So give me a break.

Mr. Speaker, I yield one minute to the gentlewoman from Texas, Ms. Jackson Lee.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman from Texas is recognized.

REP. SHEILA JACKSON LEE (D-TX): I thank you. Contrary to my good friend's words, the president of the United States is an insurrectionist. He led an insurrection against the United States of America. Prior to the January 6 attack by violent domestic terrorists, the president spoke to the crowd for one hour, and these were his words, these were his words, which is that we cannot take the nation back -- we have to take the nation back with strength and you must go and do that. Those were the paraphrase of his words.

The president provoked these domestic terrorists with words, with actions and conduct that portray and have contempt and hostility to the national value of equal justice under the law. Telling domestic terrorists, nearly all of them were white supremacists, many of them who support him politically, who stormed the Capitol to derail Congress from completing its constitutionally required duty of counting and verifying the votes.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman's time has expired. The gentleman from Massachusetts reserves. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.

COLE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker I yield one minute to my very good friend, distinguished member of Georgia, Mr. Carter.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Georgia recognized for one minute.

REP. BUDDY CARTER (R-GA): Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in opposition to this effort to move forward with impeachment hearings. What happened on Wednesday, January 6, was nothing short of pure anarchy. And those individuals who broke the law should be held accountable for their actions, they should prosecuted to the highest extent of the law and they should put in jail.

This is one of the saddest days of my life, last Wednesday, Mr. Chairman. Our thoughts and prayers are with the police officers and other law enforcement who carried out their duties on that tragic day, including Officer Sicknick and Liebengood.

Right now, our focus should be on healing, healing our nation. With so many upset and dismayed of the actions of last week, it's our responsibility to chart a path forward, to subdue the growing animosity and find ways to heal our country.

Unfortunately, I don't believe this resolution will achieve those goals, especially seven days ahead of the inauguration. This is very serious and concerning effort during such a tense and fragile time in our country. I urge my colleagues to consider will further entrench people during such a tense time. I cannot support this resolution.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman will suspend. All members are reminded to be wearing face coverings while on the floor. All members and staff should be wearing face coverings while on the floor.

The gentleman yields. The gentleman from Oklahoma reserves. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized.

MCGOVERN: Mr. Speaker, I yield one and one half minutes to the gentleman from Texas, Mr. Doggett.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Texas is recognized for one and one half minutes.

REP. LLOYD DOGGETT (D-TX): For years, Donald Trump has honored thugs worldwide who suppressed democracy. For months, with a daily diet of lies, he has made clear his refusal to accept any election in which he was not the winner.

After failing completely in his repeated attempts to intimidate both Republican election officials into committing fraud and Republican appointed judges into ignoring our Constitution, he made a desperate attempt last week to block the final election count and prevent the peaceful transition of power essential to democracy.

Trump basically attempted to overthrow the government, to violently overthrow the first branch of government, this Congress. Like his deadly reaction to the pandemic, he totally bungled the deadly attack. Both his frenzy, riotous mob and his congressional enablers were defeated. America, we did stop the steal. We stopped Donald Trump from stealing our democracy and imposing himself as a tyrant.

Today we not only demand accountability for his gross misconduct, but more importantly we declare to the next Trump-like aspiring tyrant, not in America. We love our democracy

too much. Our capitol is scarred but our democracy survives.

Violating his sworn duty to protect and defend our Constitution by seeking violently overthrow the government --

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman's time has expired. The gentleman from Massachusetts reserves.

DOGGETT: If this is not impeachable, nothing is.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.

COLE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I advise I have additional speakers on the way, but they're having a difficult time, so I will reserve my time.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Oklahoma reserves. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized.

MCGOVERN: Mr. Speaker, I yield one minute to the gentlewoman from Connecticut, Ms. Delauro.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman from Connecticut is recognized for one minute.

REP. ROSA DELAURO (D-CT): On November 3rd, the American people voted overwhelmingly for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris to serve as president and vice president of the United States. The country was about to enter a new era with great hope for change. And yet, with a decisive mandate in majority, the president used untruthful claims to end the completion of a constitutional process of collecting the electoral votes making Joe Biden president of the United States.

Not accepting the will of the American people, the president unleashed the most horrific violence that overwhelmed the security forces at this Capitol, which was overrun for the first time since 1812, putting the lives of so many at risk, indeed, a day of infamy. This impeachment will be viewed as a transcendent vote where all will be judged.

Vote to impeach the president of the United States, Donald J. Trump.

And I yield back.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman yields. The gentleman from Massachusetts reserves. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.

COLE: I continue to reserve, Mr. Speaker.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Oklahoma reserves. From Massachusetts is recognized.

MCGOVERN: Mr. Speaker, I yield one minute to the gentlewoman from Florida, Ms. Castor.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman from Florida recognized for one minute.

REP. KATHY CASTOR (D-FL): Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

I rise today to urge the impeachment of Donald Trump because the attack on the Capitol and the Congress was the single most depraved betrayal of the U.S. Constitution ever committed by a president. The traitorous incitement of an insurrection demands not just impeachment but removal from office immediately.

Violence during the transfer of power, confederate flags, anti-Semitic paraphernalia desecrated this Capitol. So accountability must come swiftly. We must act with the same resoluteness we showed in the early morning hours after the insurrection where we assured the will of the voters was effectuated. Donald Trump's defilement of this capitol will not stand. It demands impeachment now.

I yield back.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman yields. The gentleman from Massachusetts reserves. Gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized. COLE: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I yield one minute to my very good friend, distinguished gentleman from North Carolina, Mr. Bishop.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from North Carolina --

COLE: Excuse me, two minutes.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: -- for two minutes.

REP. DAN BISHOP (R-NC): Mr. Speaker, and I thank the gentleman from yielding. These articles charge incitement. Once before the House impeached a president of the United States within a week of the alleged offense. that was President Andrew Johnson days after he removed secretary of war Andrew Stanton in 1868.

Over 50 years later, the Supreme Court declared unconstitutional the tenure of office act that president Johnson refused to obey. In other words, the House was not only hasty, it was wrong, punishing non- compliance with an unconstitutional law.

At least when that occurred, the constitutionality of the law in question was unsettled. Here, however, an angry House majority races to impeachment in direct violation of settled constitutional law.

Again, the articles before House charge incitement to insurrection. They do not specify inciting language. The law is well settled. Quote, what is required to forfeit constitutional protection is incitement speech that specifically advocates for listeners to take unlawful action.

The violence last Wednesday was abhorrent. Perpetrators should be prosecuted. Those responsible for security decisions held accountable. Congress can disapprove, Revial, condemn, even censure, but you cannot, consistent with the rule of law, punish that which the Constitution's First Amendment declares protected.

If you do it, the violators of duty to this Constitution, however angry, will be those who vote for this article of impeachment. It is not Mr. Green's articles of impeachment. It is incitement. And the Constitution is settled on that point.

Thank you, I yield back.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman yields. The gentleman from Oklahoma reserves.

[10:25:02]

The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized.

MCGOVERN: Mr. Speaker, I'm proud to yield one and a half minutes to the gentlewoman from Minnesota, Ms., Omar.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman from Minnesota is recognized for one and a half minutes. REP. ILHAN OMAR (D-MN): Thank you, Chairman. Mr. Speaker, let us not mince words about what happened last week. It was a violent attempt to interrupt our democratic process. It was a targeted blow at the most essential process that makes us a democracy. It was a direct and specifically incited by the president of the United States.

For years, we have been asked to turn a blind eye to the criminality, corruption and blatant disregard to the rule of law by the tyrant president we have in the White House. We as a nation can no longer look away. The president, not only incited an insurrection against our government, but has in word and deed led a rebellion.

We cannot simply move past this or turn the page. For us to be able to survive as a functioning democracy, there has to be accountability. We must impeach and remove this president from the office immediately so that he cannot be a threat to our democracy.

I stand ready to fulfill my oath of office and I challenge my colleagues on the other side of the aisle to do the same.

I yield back.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentlewoman yields. The gentleman from Massachusetts reserves. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.

COLE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker, we continue to reserve.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Gentleman from Oklahoma reserves. The Gentleman from Massachusetts is recognized.

MCGOVERN: Mr. Speaker, I'd like to unanimous consent to insert into the record a New York Times article published January 9th entitled Our President Wants Us Here, The Mob that Stormed the Capitol. It's another example of why our country cannot risk even one more day of Donald Trump.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Without objection.

MCGOVERN: I now yield one minute to the gentleman from California, Mr. Correa.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman is recognized for one minute.

REP. LOU CORREA (D-CA): I thank the gentleman for yielding and, Mr. speaker, last week Congress was under siege by a mob, motivated and directed by the president of the United States. Our vice president was the target of that mob. Members of congress, both democrats and republicans, were targets of this mob. And I witnessed for the first time in my life Americans fighting American, all at the behest of our own president of the United States. As Americans, we can do better.

And I will vote for impeachment today for our nation, for our children and for our grandchildren. And I'll be voting for impeachment so that America will once again be the shining city upon the hill whose beacon light guides freedom loving people everywhere. I urge my colleagues to join me and vote for impeachment. With that I yield.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Massachusetts reserves. The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.

COLE: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I continue to reserve.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Oklahoma reserves. The gentleman from Massachusetts is recognize.

MCGOVERN: May I ask the gentleman how many more speakers he may have?

Whenever the gentleman is prepared to close, we'll close. we were hopeful that one of our speakers could arrive with difficult circumstances. They're just having a hard time getting here.

MCGOVERN: I think we have exhausted all of our speakers, so --

COLE: So, is my friend prepared to close?

MCGOVERN: Yes.

COLE: Then I'll close.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: The gentleman from Oklahoma is recognized.

COLE: Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank you for presiding over these difficult proceedings today. I want to thank my good friend, the distinguished chairman of the Rules Committee, and I want thank everybody that came to the floor had something to say in an important moment.

And I think the debate, while spirited, reflected the civility and decency of the institution that we're all clearly to be part of. And I'm very proud to have been part of it, I'm very pride of all the members in the manner in which they participated. I want to thank the staff and thank those who kept us safe in the process, particularly the Capitol police.

Mr. Speaker, in closing, I oppose this rule and oppose the majority's actions today. After the traumatic events of last week, the majority should be taking steps to unite us. Instead, they are only dividing us further. They're rushing to judgment, in my opinion, and bringing up impeachment after failing to follow any meaningful process, whatsoever. No hearings have been held, no witnesses heard, no process or opportunity to respond was provided to the president.

[10:30:03]

No members had an opportunity to review or amend this article before it came to the floor.